REVIEW- Morakniv Bushcraft Survival Black

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by BushcrafterAU, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. BushcrafterAU

    BushcrafterAU Master Tracker Supporter

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    REVIEW: Morakniv Bushcraft Survival Black

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    SPECS:

    • Carbon Steel
    • 3/4 length rat tail tang
    • 90 degree spine
    • 4.3” blade (109 mm)
    • 9.1” total length (232 mm)
    • 0.13” blade thickness (3.2 mm)
    • 10.5 oz. weight (298 g)
    • Made in Sweden
    • Price: $100.00 AUD

    Most of you here will have heard of Morakniv. Made in the town of Mora, Sweden, these knives are known worldwide to be inexpensive, tough, and quality. Even His Majesty the King of Sweden uses one!

    Morakniv has a large range of knives, from carving knives, to dedicated construction knives, to outdoor ‘bushcraft’ knives.

    For my first Bushcraft knife, I wanted something that was inexpensive, but good quality. So, after much research online, I found
    the Morakniv Bushcraft Survival Black. The Bushcraft Black is one of Morakniv’s knives specifically directed towards military, bushcraft, and camping. I purchased the Survival edition, which includes a Dimond sharpener on the sheath and a ferro rod.

    Today I will be putting it through it’s paces with an edge retention test, durability test, and a quality test. Then I will sum it up by telling you whether or not the Bushcraft Survival Black is worth the money.


    Test #1- Quality

    So what is the fit and finish of this thing? Very good! The handle is well made, the blade is already very sharp (although it needed a bit of a strop to get it to shaving) out of the box, and the blade coating and finish is also very good.

    The only thing I DON’T like is the sheath. It will work beautifully for about 3 months, but after that you will find that the system that locks the knife in the sheath will actually grind the tip of the finger guard off. This means that after a while, the knife can fall out if you tip the sheath upside down. This, coupled with a free-swinging belt loop that loosens up with time, means that when you are running, you might just lose your knife. To counter that problem a made my own leather sheath.


    Test #2- Edge Retention

    Well, as for edge retention, this is one aspect the knife really excelled in. I have used it to baton through Eucalyptus, then I made a feather stick, and after that it still was shaving. That’s decent for Carbon steel, although not quite as good as my Leatherman Charge’s Crucible Industries 154CM steel. Although Morakniv doesn’t list what Carbon steel they use, after much research online I was able to find it is an equivalent of 1095.


    Test #3- Durability

    So how tough is the Bushcraft Black?
    Very! Although it has only got a 3/4 length rat tail tang, it will still baton with ease. The thicker blade helps with this. And thanks to the ergonomics of the handle you will not end up with sore hands even after extended use. If you want to know exactly how tough one of these is, check out Dutch Bushcraft Knives’ destruction test of the Morakniv Robust (similar to the Bushcraft Black but cheaper).


    Fire lighting-

    One thing you will want with a Bushcraft knife is the ability to strike a ferro rod. Thanks to the rough 90 degree spine, you will find lighting a fire a pleasure with the Bushcraft Black. After a bit of practice, I am able to light a fire within about 5 strikes of the ferro rod. One thing, NEVER try to scrape a ferro rod with the blade edge. That is VERY bad for the knife.


    The Verdict-

    Pros- Affordable, tough, very ergonomic, a pleasure to use.

    Cons- The sheath. Free swinging sheath mechanism that wears out and swings very freely in time. Knife retention also wears out meaning the knife can fall out.


    4 OUT OF 5 STARS
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
  2. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

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    Habeto look it up to see a pic of it.
    Thanks for sharing with us.
    Prov 27:17
     
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  3. BushcrafterAU

    BushcrafterAU Master Tracker Supporter

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    Thanks for letting me know. I’ve edited it now with pics.
    PS. I love the Bible text you sign your name with!
     
  4. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

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    @BushcrafterAU Thank you it's how I live my live. An how an when I get the wilderness skill class's going I well also teach that good word with each class. Prov 27:17
     
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  5. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I own 2. One of them rides in a custom leather sheath made by @Martin Trj and I have convexed the edge.
    The other is just like yours.
    Very happy with them!
     
  6. riverrunner

    riverrunner Scout

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    I have one, no complaints.
     
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  7. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    The issue you describe with the sheath in point #1, has not been my experience. My Bushcraft black was my primary knife for over a year, used constantly... I'm thinking that your issue was a one-off anomaly.
     
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  8. woodsranger

    woodsranger Scout

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    My favorite knife! Switched to a Terava 110 for awhile (another outstanding knife!) but I just kept going back to the Bushcraft Black.
     
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  9. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    I've owned the budget mora carbon and now bahco 2444. Basically a stainless mora. It comes with a basic mora style sheath like yours. In both cases the sheath was the one down side. I never liked the belt clips. Like your experience over time they would fall out if upside down. I carry the bahco in a plain fabric sheath. It works well enough.
    Cheers Jim
     
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  10. BushcrafterAU

    BushcrafterAU Master Tracker Supporter

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    I even had the belt clip attachment snap off!
     
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  11. riverrunner

    riverrunner Scout

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    For those of you that have had issues with the sheath, have found a good replacement sheath?
     
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  12. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    Wow... also never happened to me. It feels quite sturdy and durable on mine. I'm surprised at this observations on your example.
     
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  13. BushcrafterAU

    BushcrafterAU Master Tracker Supporter

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    Yes maybe. It has had a pretty hard life so far... I use it extremely often. To me, the knife would be about perfect if you buy it brand new and put it straight in a kydex or leather sheath.
    Another issue with the free swinging belt loop system is that as it swings (at least on my one) it wears a noticeable depression into the handle.
    But again, the knife itself is FANTASTIC!
     
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  14. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    No issues with any of the sheaths on mine but @rnpollard makes very nice kydex sheaths.
     
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  15. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    In the spirit of true discussion I have had a completely different view and experience with modern Mora knives, let me preface this by saying that I was using Mora knives in the '60's and well into the '80's for fishing, hunting and camping, in those days and up into later years Mora knives were high quality, mostly hand made, came with beautiful birch handles that were contoured to fit most hands comfortably, good leather sheaths, and great steel that was easy to sharpen and held it's edge very well.
    Then at some point in the not so distant past labor and material costs caught up with Mora and it was faced with a choice, continue to make their knives in the old fashioned ways and raise the cost of the knives to keep up with inflation, or, retool their manufacturing, make their knives by machine, move to less expensive steels, and replace the fine wood handles with ugly red painted barrel shaped handles or with molded plastics, they also moved from well made stitched leather sheaths to cheap molded plastic sheaths.
    The old Mora knives had a rat tailed tang that went all the way through the handles and was peened in place with made the knife stronger, not so with most of the newer Mora models.
    Somewhere in the early '80's I stopped using Mora knives and traded up to brands such as Buck, Gerber, and Western Cutlery, but when I got into "Bushcraft" in about 2005 or so I was reading more and more about how great Mora knives were "for the money", so I decided to try a couple and find out just what it was that I was missing.
    What I found was that I really wasn't missing anything except the opportunity to use cheap but well made utility knives, in my definition of utility knife I mean a general purpose knife used to cut just about anything from cordage to cardboard, to carpeting, in other words anything one would not want to expose a good quality knife to.
    I bought two, a #2 classic in carbon steel and a clipper in stainless, both came with thin cheap ugly black plastic sheaths, the classic had a red painted hardwood handle that was scary slippery and not comfortable to the hand at all, I ended up stripping off the red polymer paint, reshaping the handle and finishing it with gun stock oil which made it a lot more comfortable and a lot less scary to use.
    As far as the Clipper there wasn't much that could be done to improve the looks of either the knife or it's molded plastic sheath, in use both were very sharp but edge retention was poor, in light batoning I experienced rolling of the edges and some minor chipping, but it wasn't surprising considering that they were selling for $12.00 and $18.00 respectively, but I still wouldn't call them anything more than they are which is Utility knives.
    As far as inexpensive knives run, in my opinion there are knives on the market that are much better suited for bushcraft/survival than Mora knives that run in the $30.00~ $70.00 price range, I have a couple of Condor knives, a Kephart model and a woodlaw model, neither in my opinion are great bushcraft/survival knives but in my experience with them they are every bit as good as my Mora knives but a lot better looking, both have full tangs, both come with excellent high quality leather sheaths, and though the edge retention isn't much better than the Mora's, are easier to sharpen and the edges have been less prone to chipping like I've gotten with the Mora knives.
    My favorite user knives lately are Adventure Sworn, Bark River, and a Black Feather Bush Tool, I'm a firm believer in the old adage "you get what you pay for", when you buy cheap you get cheap, there's nothing wrong with that, it all depends on your expectations I suppose.
     
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  16. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    I find that at least, at home, I use my Mora knives more for utility than anything. Yard work, garage chores, slicing up rope, tape, cutting open bags of leveling sand or garden soil, trimming the hole I cut in my garage wall for an exterior power outlet, trimming my vegetable plants, popping weed roots out of the soil, etc.
     
  17. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    I agree, a person would be hard pressed to find a better utility blade than a Mora for doing those types of chores at such an affordable price.
     
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