Review of Smith's Tri-Hone Sharpening Stones [Video]

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by Syntria, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    This is my first video review / product test. I probably should have written some notes before hand.



    Being as green as I am, I wanted a few levels of grit to practice sharpening on different types of knives (some really sharp some having lost their edge entirely). So far, I've found this set to be very effective at sharpening blades even for someone with little experience like me.

    2018-01-12 16.05.30.jpg
     
  2. Zunga

    Zunga Guide

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    Great video. I've stuck to a factory edge. Used a carbide pocket sharpener to maintain it. I mangle a knife on a stone. So I went that route. But it's only so sharp. Thanks much.
    Jim

    @Cook you were asking me about stones. Check out this video!
     
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  3. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    The tri hone is a good set up. Look up the Norton multistone. Same concept but larger, with oil tank, professional chef grade set up. I learned to use it from an old gunsmith who sharpened knives for customers. Love it as a tool.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
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  4. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Ya done well young lass. Good video. I notice you progressing along nicely with your bushclass, good for ya. joe
     
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  5. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Good job!

    Put the sweater on the puppy. It looks like it will be cold down there today.
     
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  6. Zunga

    Zunga Guide

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    It's expensive for the full meal deal. Diamond stone set up. But id been eyeing the lansky with the guide and bench clamp. But the tip about feeling the angle is making me consider flat stones again. I had the exact same mora in the video. With a cheap stone. I could keep it pretty sharp. Different knife same stone. Mangled it. Obviously inexperience on my part!
     
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  7. Woods Walker

    Woods Walker Rattlesnake Charmer. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I have shaved the hair off my arms as well and yes during multiple knives it starts to get spare. My only disappointment with the video is I wanted to see more of that puppy. :) Subbed your channel and looking forward to more videos.
     
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  8. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    I have this Smith's tri-stone set.. it works well!

    Just jumped into an Edge Pro Apex style guided sharpener.... on it's way now. I think for some knives I'll still use the Smith's stones and freehand it though.
     
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  9. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

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    Here is my set up it works for me for right now. I would like some wet stones in the future. Prov 27 : 17 0306171834.jpg
     
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  10. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    I have that Lansky set as well. It actually is a very good guided sharpener. I felt that the diamond rough "stone" lost a lot of its bite early on, but it does the job to go from dull to sharp EDC user pretty quickly. I found I could fit a big, fat 1/4" chisel tip sharpie marker at the fold of the nylon case for marking the bevels.
     
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  11. Mikewood

    Mikewood Supporter Supporter

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    Nice video. It’s good to see beginners making videos. We often get set in our ways and someone new can bring a fresh set of eyes. You should make more of this type.

    If you would like to borrow some stuff to review and try out for a month or so let me know. Open invitation.
     
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  12. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    I have been using the tri hone for years. Love it.
     
  13. Cascadian

    Cascadian Scout

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    Love your attitude, @Syntria. You're a go-getterer.
     
  14. roadwarrior

    roadwarrior Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    We had them in Carpentry class and they did a great job on the Carpentry tools.
     
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  15. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    :3 thank you
     
  16. Ryan Alexander

    Ryan Alexander Tracker

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    After 10 years of abuse lol, i was maybewor 13 y/o when i got these stones for Christmas. I remember spending hours trying to learn how to sharpen that ontario knife HAHA i didn't have internet or nuthin so i had no clue.
    [​IMG]worth every penny

    I'm still trying to figure out the trick to polishing.. my knifes are razor sharp but look scratched up kinda annoying
     
  17. weedeater64

    weedeater64 Tracker

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    FYI you don't have to use oil on an 'oil' stone. 'Oilstone' is a bit of a misnomer. You'll have less mess and clogging with water, better still some window cleaner, neat trick learned from an expert edge master on youtube.
     
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  18. Midwest.Bushlore

    Midwest.Bushlore Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I like the fact that you're not afraid to dive in and figure stuff out! So let me give you a little constructive criticism, or perhaps some instruction, about the burr. Because the burr is almost everything in sharpening.

    Let's say you have been chatting with a person online for a few months and are hitting it off. You decide you and a friend will pick him up and take him to see a movie with you. So you hop in your car and start driving. After a while your friends asks, "Where does he live?"

    "Ummm, I don't have his actual address" you reply.

    "Well, what part of town then?"

    "I'm not really sure what town he lives in" you admit.

    "Crikey! Then tell me his name and I'll look it up!"

    "Hmmm, I guess I never got his name!
    " you tell her.

    "Are you serious? At least tell me what he looks like!" she exclaims.

    "Uh, I think he's...tall?
    " you say.:8:

    So that's your plan! You're going to drive around randomly, hoping eventually you'll find him without even recognizing him if you do run into him!

    That's what you're doing trying to really sharpen properly without understanding creating a burr!;)

    I'll dispense with jargon and fine detail and distill it down to an explanation that will fit on a cocktail napkin! Sharpening is a bit like chess- you can completely learn all the rules you need to play it in an afternoon but it might take years to master. Likewise if you understand the burr basically everything else is just icing on the cake.

    The two sides of the blade meet at an angle. This angle defines the cutting edge or bevel of the knife. Ideally the two edges will meet cleanly and precisely in a defined line. Over time and with use a few things can happen to this edge. First it can begin to fold over. That's something you're trying to fix when you run your knife across a hone/steel/strop. This is most basic step of maintaining a knife. But over time you can develop chips as you have noted on your Shun. This is when small bits of the edge physically break off of the blade. The third major way to lose the edge is to physically wear it down; as the metal wears away your fine sharp peak turns into a rounded hill.

    This is when we sharpen the knife. Sharpening and honing are two different things. Honing primarily aims to comb the stray bits of folded steel back up into a row. Sharpening is removing metal to create a new edge.

    When you were a little kid did you ever shampoo your hair into a mohawk? You comb it up from one side then the next. After a few licks it will start to stand up. But did you notice that it would kind of fold over a bit to the opposite side of the one you combed? In a nutshell, that's how a burr works. It's like pushing your mashed potatoes up into a pile, as you fix one side it kind of folds over.

    Steel behaves like that. It doesn't flow like shampooed up hair or mashed potatoes, but it does flow. But you won't get a burr until both sides meet. It will take a fair amount of grinding if your knife is dull, and very little grinding if it's not. But as the sides start to meet in the metal you create the burr, a bit of folded metal that's kind of work hardened and weakened from being "combed" from one side to the other. At first the burr will be very small, so small you may not be sure it's there. But if you keep going it will get large enough to actually see with the naked eye! If you look edge-on at the edge you can see it light glinting off it; that's because different parts are twisted into different angles each catching the light differently.

    The easiest way to detect the burr is to feel it. This might require a bit of practice but with a prominent burr you can't help but feel it. The burr will form on the opposite side that you've last ground. Hold the knife horizontally, parallel with the ground, tip pointing away from you. Then with the side you just sharpened facing upward, lightly run your fingers along the other side- go from the spine towards the edge, lifting your fingers off as though you were scraping something off your fingertips. Be careful of course not to cut yourself but you're going across and away from the edge so it's pretty safe. You should be able to feel a "catch" there. That's the burr!

    Since your stroke won't be perfectly consistent and the knife may be worn unevenly you won't necessarily get a burr that runs the entire length of the blade at once. It will usually form in one small patch, then spread as you get the entire blade meeting in the middle.

    Once you have that burr along the entire edge of the knife, you're almost there! You need to remove the burr, or "deburr" the edge. There's a little controversy as to how this should be done. Some advocate using felt, a leather belt, a strop, a ceramic hone, etc. Others prefer to move on to a finer and stone and gradually work away the burr. I won't say that one way is right and the other is wrong, and both will work. Certainly if you just keep moving to progressively finer stones, the bulk of the burr will gradually wear away. When you can't detect any more burr (there are some 'advanced' ways to find this point) then you can go to a strop.

    The strop is, on some level and in some ways, like a finer stone. But fabric and leather will catch fine bits of metal (stray threads of steel left over from the burr) and gently remove them. That's why many people will finish the sharpening job by going over the strop. Press firmly but not too firmly- you can roll the edge over if you press super hard.

    So here it is, the Cocktail Napkin Version of it: Grind away metal, first one side then the next, and repeat until both sides meet in the middle. This can be determined by noting the formation of the burr. Repeat on finer stones until the burr is gone and voila! you've sharpened the knife. The cool thing is that it doesn't matter how you sharpen- corundum, water stone, belt sander, a rock you found by the river, the edge of your car window, the bottom of a ceramic coffee cup, etc- it will fundamentally work the exact same way!
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2018

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