Roselli Nikkarinpuukko

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by Frederick89, Nov 24, 2018.

  1. Frederick89

    Frederick89 Scout

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    Second review of the series. First one is here.
    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/kauhavan-puukkopaja-yleispuukko.236862/


    Roselli Nikkarinpuukko

    Heimo Roselli
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    founded his firm in 1976, after two years of self taught forging, in Harmoinen, a town 90 km east of Tampere, in central Finland.

    Given the period in which he started his activity he can boast, and doesn’t loose a chance to do so, of being one of the blacksmiths that contributed to the rebirth of Finnish bladesmithing.
    In those years Finland was living a heavy transition towards factory productions, so also the replacement of forged objects with the stamped and cheaper counterparts. Knives weren’t an exception and blacksmiths and knifesmiths that kept forging knives to a certain level weren’t many: Kustaa Lammi, Altti Kankaanpää, Yrjö Puronvarsi, Veikko Hakkarainen, Roselli and few others.

    During the 80s and 90s Roselli shifted from hammer forging to the current with hydraulic press and stamping; the knives shifted from full convex and full length tang, to “scandi” and hidden tang; the sheaths dismissed the back stitching to adopt the current mixed one. Today H. Roselli Oy employs, together with the founder, ten workers.


    blade

    length - 87 mm
    wideness -21 mm
    thickness - 3 mm
    steel - W75
    grind - flat
    edge angle - 17°, slightly convex
    edge hardness - ~ 60 HRC

    handle
    length - 112 mm
    wideness - 28 mm max.
    thickness - 20 mm max.

    weight
    knife - 75 g
    with sheath - 111 g


    The blade was stamped from a bar of W75, a pure unalloyed carbon steel with 0,75% C. The blade is shaped with various stages of press forging, grinding and sanding. It has an untapered flat section. Blades are heat treated in batches of about twenty five pieces, quenched in oil and tempered in oven. The bevels are grinded to 17° with just a hint of convexing at the very edge.

    The curly birch handle is roughed with routers then finished on belt sander with a medium grit. It has a 3 mm nickel silver bolster, medium proportions and tapers strongly towards the blade, both in thickness and wideness. It has a hint of hooked pommel and a reverse teardrop section.

    The sheath, made of 2 mm leather, is machine stitched. The leather of the mouth is folded inside to increase the retention; there is a double sided plastic liner; the belt loop has two simple slots. The retention is quite strong, but to unsheath isn’t necessary to apply a lot of force.

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    To be continued
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2018
  2. Frederick89

    Frederick89 Scout

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    In use

    Among Roselli models, the Nikkarinpuukko is the most conventionally puukko shaped and the more jack-of-all-trades, being big enough, but light. It isn’t Roselli’s best selling model, though.
    It has a slightly handle heavy balance.

    Before starting I stropped it with Bark River black (#3000) and green (#6000) compounds.
    Let’s start with the six months seasoned plane spikkentrolls.
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    The puukko had good bite working both with and against the grain. I felt some resistance only when thinning the second hat, using the blade’s belly. A loss of bite was already clear after one troll and after the second the knife was actually struggling when working against the grain. The handle always allowed an excellent control, good speed and force when needed. At the end on the work, after having planed two knots, the edge was pristine, but the bite completely gone from all the edge. I then gave it ten passes per side with black and green compounds.
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    I then moved forward with the three months poplar wood wizard.
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    In this case I felt like the convex edge paid something in aggressiveness when planing the two sides, against the grain, making the cuts around the branch and flattening the base at the end. It was on the other hand fair enough when cutting with the grain. The tip, combined with the acute bevels, was nimble enough to engrave the two grooves marking the nose’s profile, but too thick to work well around the lower lip.
    The handle was again excellent for control and comfort.
    At the end of the work the edge was pristine, but the bite was completely gone again. I gave it twelve passes per side with green compound.
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    I concluded with the one year seasoned silver fir spatula.
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    Good bite, nice handle, spine rounded enough to be comfortable. No particular problems while roughing the spine and the front part of the spatula.
    While roughing the belly and shaft the puukko was still comfortable and quick, but halfway through the work the bite was drastically decreased and the force I had to apply to pull the knife towards me was growing fast. Before all the finishing cuts I gave it fifteen passes on green compound.
    Completing the belly and junction with shaft, then all the finishing cuts was now rather easy even though the bite loss was fast. Flattening the sides to thin down the flats of the spatula wasn’t always efficient, due to the tendency of the convex edge to slip on the surface rather than bite. The shaft junction was less clean also.
    At the end of the work the edge was, once again, pristine and the bite was, again, completely gone.
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    Conclusions

    Probably the most comfortable and nimble handle among factory made puukkos. It would most likely get advantage from a carbides forming tool steel, enhancing its edge holding. The W75 and the acute geometries relegate it almost exclusively to green wood. The heat treatment which, according to H. Roselli Oy itself, doesn’t allow to determinate precisely the final hardness, strongly influenced by the position of the single blade inside the oven while tempering, isn’t enough to guarantee long term perfomnaces on dry wood. Not surprisingly it’s extremely easy to resharpen and, as already said, fast in losing its bite. It requires stropping every 20 minutes or so.
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  3. MountainWanderer

    MountainWanderer Supporter Supporter

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    Nice review- as always from you.
    Thanks Federico !
     
  4. pellegrino

    pellegrino Supporter Supporter

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    Thanks for the thorough review, Federico!
     
  5. riokid87

    riokid87 Scout

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    Ok. Nice looking wood. Considering audience measurements in inches not mm would be nice. Is that 1075? If so not the best steel available but if intent is an authentic reproduction then I completely understand its choice. My overall impression is for nostalgia's sake it might be ok but for practical use there are many many much better options available.
     
  6. Frederick89

    Frederick89 Scout

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    The knife was designed in the 70s, when Finland had little access to alloyed steels and I didn't have the impression Roselli has any intention to modernize. Also diamond stones do exist and are produced, but are still less used than whetstones, especially in the countryside, so the steel choise mostly follows the fact that the majority of the users will carve green wood and sharpen on whetstones.

    Blade in inches is 3.42''x0.82''x0.12'', handle in inches is 4.4''x1.10''x0.78'', weights in ounces are 2.64 and 3.91.
     

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