Schrade 24OT Splinter

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by leaf and lightning, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. leaf and lightning

    leaf and lightning Guide

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    Just got my Schrade 24OT, and figured I would share my thoughts.


    Why I bought it:

    I liked the idea of the Flexcut Carving Jack, with it's assortment of carving tools (all I've ever really used is a pocket knife), but a $130 price tag just wasn't something I could justify. I mean, it's nice and all, but for a hobbiest, even a serious one, it's just way too expensive. Enter the Schrade 24OT Splinter. Now, I am kinda dubious about Schrade in general. I've got a couple of their newer knives with inconsistent heat treats, and had the spring break on one, so their quality hasn't done much to win me over in recent years. But the Splinter was A LOT cheaper than the Carving Jack. It started at about $30, and the price kept dropping, till I just couldn't pass it up at $17. You could buy 6 Schrade's for less than the price of one Flexcut. Even if Schrade’s quality is iffy, being over $100 less than the Flexcut makes it at least a viable option for most people.


    Now, the Flexcut does have features that the Schrade lacks. It has locking blades, a special sharpener and strop that fits the different blades, and from what I have heard, comes sharp out of the box. These are all nice, but not $100 worth of nice, IMHO. The locking blades are great, but as I see it, unnecessary. Using the knife should put pressure towards the cutting edge of the blades, holding them open when carving, just like any slip-joint knife used for whittling. Maybe the straight chisel and gouge could benefit from locking, but just being careful when using those tools should be enough(plus, even if it closed on you, there isn’t a sharp edge to cut your finger) And having to sharpen the blades before using them isn't worth $100 either. Your still going to have to sharpen it whenever it gets dull anyway, what's one more time?(and if you don't know how to sharpen your tools, why are you carving?) And the special sharpener/strop is only $14(I checked). The Flexcut is probably better steel, and made better, but I just can't get over the price.


    First impressions:

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    Decent heft. Fits the hand well enough. Needs some oil or something on the “curved” side, really tough to get open. Seems to lock open about like a slip-joint should(a touch looser than I like on the detail knife, but not bad, and the rest were tight). No side to side play in any of the tools. It does need a good sharpening. None of the tools are what I would call sharp.

    I was a little surprised when I looked the box. Apparently Taylor Brands is no longer making them. BTI Tools, a division of Smith & Wesson, bought them out. Under Taylor, the quality wasn't good. They're still made in China, but maybe the quality is better now. The lemons I got were all from when it was owned by Taylor.


    I'll need to spend some time putting a decent edge on the tools, and then I'll see how she carves (my better half has been bugging me to make a wooden spoon, so I'll probably start with that.) Till then...
     
  2. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter

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    Thanks for the review. I have been contemplating one of these as well, just to have everything in one unit.
     
  3. leaf and lightning

    leaf and lightning Guide

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    IMG_20180707_192449.jpg
    Banged this out of some striped maple tonight. I really only used the detail blade, the curved blade, and the right-angled curve gouge. There is a limit to how deep you can make the bowl. Go too far, and the bolster hits, and you can't go deeper. Not a knife for making ladles or kuksas. But for spoons it works well. The v-gouge and chisel probably come in handy for making other things. The edge held up through the whole thing. I'll have to see how long it holds overall.
     
  4. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter

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    Good start on the knife. :) Anxious to see how it holds up.
     
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  5. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock Still going Supporter

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    @leaf and lightning hey brother have you had a chance to do anymore carving with the splinter ?
     
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  6. leaf and lightning

    leaf and lightning Guide

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    Unfortunately not. Been busy the last few weekends. Hope to get some more time to play with it soon.
     
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  7. leaf and lightning

    leaf and lightning Guide

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    Used the v gouge and straight chisel to carve out the blade pocket in a wooden sheath liner. Bit of a learning curve (granted, I've never used either for carving before) but once I figured it out, it work well.
     
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  8. haunted

    haunted Guide

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    i wanted one for my birthday wife got me a t shirt instead (at least it was Svengoolie)
     
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