Sharing my new custom knife

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by JasonJ, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    3,316
    Location:
    Bay City, MI
    Sharing my new custom knife

    Firstly, this is not a review per se, but some of the explanations of what I think of the knife may be review-y… but since no in-depth testing or analysis is being done here, I don’t feel it warrants being in the “Reviews” sub-forum. If mods disagree, it can be moved at their discretion.

    I recently received my first custom knife order; a Woodlore inspired design made and sold by @BogdanS from Bushcraft-Kit Knives. He calls this the “Aurochs”.

    I ordered it fitted with bog oak scales (as old as he could source- ended up being carbon dated as 10,000 year old bog oak, from Germany), red-brick colored liners, mosaic pins, stainless lanyard tube, and shaped to very specific and custom measurements to fit my hand. It arrived all of that and was executed wonderfully.

    I also requested a customized and modified sheath design, different from what he typically has made for his knives. While Bogdan makes the blades, his wife crafts the leather sheaths. They are made from thick vegetable tanned ox hide. He told me that the hides come from oxen that are used in the local farms, but once they become too old or die, the hides are retained and he is able to acquire some for the sheaths. I can attest, it is very thick and very durable leather- right between 8-10oz if I had to guess (I have not measured it).

    The handle fits my hand exceptionally well, with the palm swell of the scales fitting right into the pocket of my palm and is the correct length to be able to pinch grip my thumb and forefinger right at the blade. The first day I received it, I used it for the next 2 days, often wood-crafting and carving for 60-90 minutes at a time and never once felt fatigue or hot spots. This is what happens when a tools handle fits the human handle well. I had not experienced this before in any production knives I own.

    The blades are sharpened to a zero-grind scandi and it arrived scary sharp. In using it on some young birch with a few knots, I did micro chip the front ½” of the blade, and rolled a spot or two. This straightened out with a ceramic rod and a strop.

    I attributed this to the usual very fine, sometimes more brittle edge that a belt/machine ground blade sometimes has when it is new. Bogdan confirmed this when I mentioned it. I have since ran the entire bevel over a 1000 grit Arkansas stone and stropped it over bare leather, and have not had the same problem since doing so.

    Enough of that, PICTURES!!!!

    General appearance shots:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Sits nice and deep in the sheath:
    [​IMG]
    Some fitment to my hand shots:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And in Post 2.....
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2018
    trentu, MrFixIt, Ptpalpha and 28 others like this.
  2. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    3,316
    Location:
    Bay City, MI
    Cont..

    I did make fire with it, using shavings and scrapings of fatwood placed on birch bark:


    [​IMG]

    I also carved a “knife” for my son… never did this before, so it’s crude. But he loved it.

    [​IMG]

    It doesn’t cut fatwood well, however. LOL.

    [​IMG]

    Some of the edge damage that ensued, but this all cleaned up and hasn’t been a problem since:

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Overall, I am VERY pleased and Bogdan was a pleasure to work and speak with. I think I may have caught the bug, because now there are about 3 or 4 other custom makers I am looking at whose blades I now want. Thanks for looking!
     
  3. WY_Not

    WY_Not Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    Messages:
    2,127
    Likes Received:
    4,804
    Location:
    Casstown, Ohio
    Nice looking knife. Loving the scales. And, the attention to detail to make the orientation of the mosaic pins match... :dblthumb:
     
  4. Skruffy

    Skruffy Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2017
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    1,563
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Very nice knife! That looks to be one you can pass down to your son. Thanks for the great pics! :dblthumb:
     
  5. Mikewood

    Mikewood Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2013
    Messages:
    2,244
    Likes Received:
    3,408
    Very nice. I particularly like the coffin head like knob on the end of the handle. You don’t often see those. Very distinctive.
     
    Swamp Pirate, central joe and JasonJ like this.
  6. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    3,316
    Location:
    Bay City, MI
    Thanks for the replies guys! Yeah he did a really nice job on this one.. I had such very specific requests of the build, no issue at all accommodating.

    You're not kidding! That would have drove me INSANE if they weren't aligned the same. lol.

    Definitely agree. I think that handle shapes like this one are reminescent of the swooping lines and curves you used to see on the classy automobiles of the 1930s ... think 1935 Auburn Speedster or a '37 Talbot Lago.
     
  7. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    Messages:
    6,336
    Likes Received:
    36,406
    Location:
    upstate south carolina
    That should serve ya well young fellar. I like it. joe
     
  8. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2017
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    That is just superb looking, very much like the blade to handle ratio. Congratulations on getting a useable heirloom. :)
     
    JasonJ and Swamp Pirate like this.
  9. Swamp Pirate

    Swamp Pirate Lifetime Supporter Lifetime Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2016
    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    3,368
    Location:
    The Swamps Of South Carolina
    Very Nice, Thanks For Sharing!
     
    JasonJ likes this.
  10. Virgil Grey

    Virgil Grey Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    383
    @BogdanS puts a beautifully thin edge on his grinds, and they do come zero degree.

    I just give mine a good stropping before hand and put a hairs width micro bevel on it, works a charm and his heat treat has been outstanding in my experience.

    Glad you hit it on the stoned and strop.. You should enjoy the excellent heat treat now and shouldn't see any chipping at all. His blades cut like a laser. I love them thin.. Much easier to adjust a thin edge vs a thick. Talk about stock removal, shreds through seasoned hardwoods like butter!

    Awesome post and beautiful blade!
     
    JasonJ likes this.
  11. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    3,316
    Location:
    Bay City, MI
    Indeed! I cut a burrito in half with it moments after receiving it... glided right through about 9 layers of wrapped tortilla, beef, rice and fritos chips with zero effort, down through the wrapper (yes, Taco Bell lol), and accidentally cut a 1mm deep slit into my mother-in-laws' decorative place mat on the table.. I told no one.

    It debarked the birch branch I used for my sons' whittled Mora-style knife like a hot knife strips off pads of butter. In bulk removal, it sheared through the wood with thick chips flying to the ground. I was impressed.

    The heat treat seems spot on to me; the slight edge rolling and micro chipping I saw I attribute to that very fine wire edge that a belt would leave- the heat likely making that very fine edge more brittle. Once you sharpen or strop past that, you're into the meat of the good heat treated steel and it's just fine. So far so good.

    Does anyone know if/how to protect and treat bog oak? I looked it up online but found nothing more than a passing mention of possibly tung oil. This piece I have does not seem brittle, or open pored .. so just something to keep it in good condition.
     

Share This Page