Sharpening am i doing something wrong?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by NordicWolf, May 29, 2019.

  1. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    so i got a casstrom no. 10 Ive been using for my first bushcraft knife and have been loving but ive noticed its been getting pretty scratched up either from use or from sharping on a stone the first time i sharpened it after doping it and getting bit of a ding on a rock....now i know its camp gear its not gonna stay pretty for ever some will say gives it character just making sure im not doing any thing wrong when i sharpened it ime very paranoid since im very inexperience when ti comes to sharpening that im going to mess my knife up...i can put up pic of my knife if you all will think ti may up jsut really worried i did something to ruin it
     
  2. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch Scout

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    Unless your useing power tools it would take alot to ruin your knife.Scratches seem unavoidable on anything i have ever used.Keep at it on a stone until you figure it out and it can take awhile.
     
  3. victoratsea

    victoratsea LB #42 Supporter

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    Of course not! If you use it and sharpen it, knives get scratched up. Keep at it; you'll get better at sharpening with practice, but stay away from grinders.
    Victor
     
  4. Scarywoody

    Scarywoody Scout

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    I use a ceramic sharpening stone on mine to maintain the edge. To re-shape the grind I use wet stones. Here's a good video.

     
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  5. central joe

    central joe Wait For Me!! Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    The coarness of the stone is directly related to the size of the scratches. I use a fine stone and have fine scratches, a leather strop will help some, but won't completely get rid of them. It is just a part of sharpening. joe
     
  6. JerseyDevilJeeper

    JerseyDevilJeeper Professional Guide Supporter

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    Just keep at it... it’ll eventually work
     
  7. kamagong

    kamagong Scout

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    Is this your first time owning a knife other than the type you use in the kitchen? Sharpening is nothing more than using a stone to abrade a metal blade so as to form a thin wedge. The sharpening process itself is meant to leave scratches behind. That's how you know it's working and removing metal. If the sharpening process didn't leave scratches it means that the blade is harder than the sharpening material, in which case you'd be doing nothing more than burnishing the metal.

    As to scratches during use, that happens. Steel is hard, but there are plenty of things that are harder. Cardboard for example contains silicates that will scratch and dull a blade.
     
  8. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    All my knives have sharpening scratches - no worries there! You'll get better at doing it, too. I used to worry over angle, and now I try to relax and not take it too seriously. And as far as dinging a blade on a rock, I might have done that too... Lots of times :D Maybe even on concrete :8:
     
  9. JasonJ

    JasonJ Supporter Supporter

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    I got talked into running my Kershaw Oso Sweet through the guided portion of a Worksharp sharpener at an outdoor expo... messed up my already great edge immediately... I went home cursing under my breath. About 15 mins with a coarse diamond (well worn in) and a hard arkansas stone followed by a green compound loaded strop, back to perfect. Even "the best" machine sharpeners will mess an edge up.

    And that's how I have a knick about 1/3 of the way down my Bushcraft Black's blade. Oops... batonned that guy right into the patio.

    I like to use a chisel point sharpie/perm marker to color my bevels as I sharpen... a very good visual indicator if you are at the right angle- whether you want to go higher, lower or stay right where she's at. After a while, you just get a feel for it and it's like magic.
     
  10. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    awesome i feel a bit better thank you all so much ive been using a ceramic lansky puck thats about all i have right now now
     
  11. Scarywoody

    Scarywoody Scout

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  12. rbinhood

    rbinhood Scout

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  13. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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  14. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    Does this work on scandi grind knives I find on a lot of that most scandi grind knives are too wide to fit in the slots in these sort of sharpeners
     
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  15. IzaWildman

    IzaWildman Grey Owl Supporter

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    A picture would help to understand what’s going on.
     
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  16. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    ill post one tonight when i get home from work
     
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  17. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    Two years hard graft and my Skrama had three pretty deep notches in the edge. I'd hit angle iron, my trailer, and cut ivy off a brick wall with it. To get the damage out would mean taking 1/3, maybe 1/2mm off the edge. Thats a lot of metal to take off. The only way is to use some pretty aggressive grits to remove metal fast enough. (If it was an even cheaper knife it would have been power tool time, belt sander, but power tools can really damage blades fast. Burn chunks out so don't do it without the right belts at the right speeds.) By hand will take a while even with aggressive grits, but what else do you have to do with your time? Its "knife time" and you learn something about the knife; some of us quite enjoy sharpening.
    Aggressive grits remove metal reasonably fast, with obvious scratches. Once the big damage has gone work down the grits to finer and finer until the scratches disappear, get smaller and smaller. You have to work to the grit and can't force it by adding more pressure. You will feel the grit working and thats all you can ask, the rest is time working at it. If you want no scratches at all then that takes polishing. Polishing can take forever but with fine enough polishing compounds a mirror finish can be done. Takes very little pressure too. Thats how blades are done in the factory or custom shop. Just what finish you eventually want or leave is how much time you want to spend. Factories just have all the tools to fasten the process.
    If not much damage then you don't have to use the most aggressive grits. The finer grits just take less off each stroke.
    Factory paint finishes, or stone washed, or something clever, can't be done at home, which is why they are only good for the "shop" look. Any knife used hard will lose them.
    What grit system you use be it wet stones, diamond blocks, stones, or grit papers, really doesn't matter, but you will need from course to super fine. I usually use diamond as its fast enough and does it OK for me.

    For the final sharpen then its all about consistent angle to get that final edge you want. For really keen smooth edges finish with a lapping compound on a strop or leather paddle and polish that final edge.
    Sharpening systems are great but the better a large investment. I hand sharpen because its fast and I can get an OK finish for me. It took me a while to get it right but its not that difficult. Most of my knives have long lost that factory fresh look, but then I use them.

    Sharpening is just removing metal and leaving a sharp angled apex. Got to take material off somehow. Takes many years to take so much off there isn't much knife left. If you mess us just do it again and again until you get it right.

    Most of the time I just get my knives to a working edge as in a few outings it will need doing again. If you are going to use a knife regularly then it will need regular sharpening. Often and little is better than let go dull and need a deep sharpen.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
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  18. JasonJ

    JasonJ Supporter Supporter

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  19. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    here are the pics you request to see what i have going one

    IMG_20190529_213123.jpg IMG_20190529_213128.jpg
     
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  20. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch Scout

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    Wow you got some work to do,that big scratch is from a stone?Thats a real nice knife.
     
  21. rbinhood

    rbinhood Scout

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    It's a knife, not a violin. If you are going to use it, it is going to get a few scratches. What you have there looks pretty good, and if it was mine, I wouldn't worry about it. I think the sharpener I linked you to above will sharpen that knife.
     
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  22. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    How do you mean and what do you recommend
     
  23. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    I will have to check it out
     
  24. DCP

    DCP Guide Bushclass I

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    Ignore him, if you use you knife you will get scratches

     
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  25. kamagong

    kamagong Scout

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    Everything eventually shows marks if used.

    [​IMG]
     
  26. Caleb Cox

    Caleb Cox Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    I was hoping Trigger would make an appearance!
     
  27. Scarywoody

    Scarywoody Scout

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    To get the polish back in the blade you can use high grit sand paper. I use 1000 grit or 1200 grit. Then I use the wife's old nail polish block. Make sure its old they get pissed when you use their new one. Gets a mirror polish and smooth cutting edge.
     
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  28. Jacob

    Jacob Guide

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    @NordicWolf
    Don’t sweat it, if it cuts then it’s fine. Those fancy mirror polished blades are pretty and fun to do sometimes but they they take a long time. If the EDGE is sharp enough for your uses it doesn’t matter what it looks like.
     
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  29. Geneh

    Geneh Supporter Supporter

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    The smaller scratches above the bevel are likely caused by loose grit as you sharpen. Keep your stone rinsed and rinse your knife frequently so you don't get too much coarse grit hanging around. I sometimes use masking tape on my blade to minimize any chance of that. It also looks like there are factory machine scratches on the bevel yet? The only real difference is the factory scratches are consistent giveing a finished look, your sharpening scratches are not. No biggie.

    I wouldn't sweat the larger long scratches. It happens and waayyyy to difficult to remove...just to get more scratches.

    It's pretty hard to ruin a blade like that because there is so much metal you can remove to correct the mistakes and damage from use. Chips, broken tips, messed up bevels - you just have to take your time, check the progress very frequently, take a break and come back to it. Maybe a few days later even. Muscle memory takes time so be patient with yourself.

    When you watch the YouTube videos pay attention to the hand positioning: hand on the blade does most of the moving, and puts pressure with fingers very close to the edge or centered (front to back, not tip to tail) on the wide bevel, in the area you want to remove the most metal. The other hand more or less holds the blade angles and blade positioning on the stone with a little assistance moving the knife across the stone.

    Practice practice practice. Make sharpening a hobby and you will have awesome cutting tools, each one taylored to how you use it. HAVE FUN!
     
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  30. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch Scout

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    Maybe its a shadow kinda looks uneven.Keep going till your happy with it.
     
  31. NordicWolf

    NordicWolf Scout

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    thank you everyone i feel a lot better about this now again you all are very supportive and helpful
     
  32. buckfynn

    buckfynn Old Geezer Lifetime Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    There is nothing wrong with the way your knife's edge looks. Personally I wouldn't about the scratches at all. I place more importance on how the knife is cutting for me than appearance.
     
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  33. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    One scratch doesn't look great; you just need to do a thousand more and the knife will look a veteran...very cool.
    The problem with a new knife is getting enough history on it that another scratch doesn't matter.
     
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