Sharpening

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Edge308, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. Edge308

    Edge308 Scout

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    So, probably like many of you not only am I obsessed with knives but with keeping them razor sharp. I use different sharpeners for different knives example: I don't put scandi knives on the work sharp. The systems that I have now are coarse and fine diamond stones I have a work sharp and I have a sharpmaker and I have a two sided strop one side with green paste the other plain. I've searched through the threads and as you can imagine there are just too many to read every post. Bottom line is ive been looking different stone like 10,000 grit 30,000 grit does anyone use these? Also how sharp do you keep your bush knife? All of mine are shaving sharp however after reading some threads I see that the edges don't hold up because hey are too thin? Opinions?


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  2. tabasco_joe

    tabasco_joe Supporter Supporter

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    I use or have used quite a few sharpening techniques and media. I have some of all the manual media ranging from paper, stones, ceramic, and diamond, etc. Also a bunch of power sharpeners and manual "fixture" types of setups. So I end up with various favorite techniques depending on what I'm sharpening. (I have a full wood shop so lot's of various tools to sharpen.)

    For my bushcraft knives, I'm referring to knives with 3" to 5" blades intended for use in the field, I tend to use manual methods. Usually either the sandpaper method or a diamond stone. After which I strop on a paint stirrer strop using Dialux Blue. These are sharpened to hair popping sharpness. I've had no issues with maintaining edges under normal use. I strop after each outing.

    For axes once the edge is contoured (refurbished head) I use the drywall sanding block method followed by a leather strop on the same block using green compound. These I get close to hair popping. Edges get dinged a little bit by stones in the bark that I have to retouch long before any other issues. I retouch if needed and strop after each outing.

    For large chopper type knives I will often initially sharpen on a power sharpener and use larger stones. Then strop with green compound.

    For my carving knives I am starting to use a Worksharp 3000 to sharpen and a leather wheel on a Grizzly sharpener to strop. (Thus my recent thread.) I've been alternating between the yellow Flexcut and Dialux Blue compounds.

    I think the edge issues that some people see are a combination of knife material, heat treating, edge angle/profile, and use. I haven't had issues across a range of knives. If I do I'll just keep track for trends and adjust if needed.

    As to your question on very fine grits; I have only found grits that fine to be of value on my carving knives. I'm talking about small, thin, blades used for carving figurines and such.

    I do keep experimenting and could well change my opinion at a later date.
     
  3. Edge308

    Edge308 Scout

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    lol I'm glad I'm not the only one with an obsession. I appreciate the info. Funny you mentioned axes. I touched up my GFB axe in the sharpmaker for kicks the other night worked great.


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  4. gene stoner

    gene stoner Scout

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    This is and has been my main sharpener for 30+ years. I also have a few stones and a ceramic pocket sharpener but 99% of my sharpening is done on my very old butcher steel. You don't need to spend alot of money on a high speed low drag sharpener just find a good 2ed hand quality steel. I see them at antique stores all the time for about $10. This thing even sharpens my one serated blade and yes it keeps all my blade's shaving sharp. The fist rule of knife sharpening is never let it get dull. Keep it touched up. Letting a blade get dull causes more wear and tear on it.
    One of my favorite tricks for touching up a blade when I'm out and about is using the top edge of a car window. It won't "sharpen" a blade but it well keep it razor sharp.


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  5. Rice5505

    Rice5505 Tracker

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    I have several. Stone wise I use a DMT XXF 8,000. Then go to a 2micron strop and then a 0.5micron. Sharpen pretty much after every outing. Also use a 1x30 belt sander and and 3m belts with leather belts and then homemade strop compound.

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  6. Edge308

    Edge308 Scout

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    I'm ex military I laughed when you said high speed low drag haven't heard that in years.


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  7. Woods Walker

    Woods Walker Rattlesnake Charmer. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I use sandpaper for most things these days be it scandi or convex. If the knife shaves it is a go but certainly won't hesitate to roll if the shaving is rough/hardly after some outings so long as the edge can scrape a nail good. First chance I get will often put the shaving edge back on.
     
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  8. Redneck Bear

    Redneck Bear Tracker

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    Hi, hope I can use this thread. :)

    I'd got a new Mora Classic #1, used it for a while and now I want to sharpen it. It looked as there was a microbevel so I started on 150 grit, then moved to 320 grit. I was checking the edge with cutting paper and against my lamp to see where there are still reflections and where there are not.

    My problem is that while the edge is mostly sharpened, there are two areas both about 2mm long which keep reflecting light - one in the middle of the edge and the other at the beginning of the curve towards the tip.

    I even returned back to 150 and "resharpened" the whole edge but it didn't change anything. Then I moved to 320 again but again - no success. Now I decided to let it go and moved even finer to 1000 grit but again - most of the knife is sharp and not reflecting light, but these two areas do.

    I add that when cutting paper the one in the middle doesn't "catch" the paper, the forward one does.

    Any hints, please? :)
     
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  9. mtngunr

    mtngunr Scout

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    you have some nicks or rolled edges still needing to be ignored, or worked out by more sharpening. That, or burr never stropped off edge. Strop first...otherwise...

    If you are like our OP, you will break out your hundreds of dollars of sharpening equipment and supplies, and keep grinding your knife away until it is just perfect, then maybe put it away to keep it that way.

    OR, admit a few glints maybe effect nothing in use, and let those few glints get worked out through normal sharpening when actually needed.

    Before stoning, try straightening dings with smooth metal, rather than trying to grind out every ding in edge...any smooth, hard, non-abrasive surface will work, including large smooth shanks of bolts or your stainless kitchen sink (if you are not using porcelain).

    I just steel edges, strop on smooth hard cardboard with rouge, and use a Lansky when all else fails.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  10. mtngunr

    mtngunr Scout

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    I still say that all the time. Matches my still worn high and tight for us danger rangers, donchaknow...
     
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  11. tabasco_joe

    tabasco_joe Supporter Supporter

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    Hard to tell exactly without looking at it. I wouldn't keep dropping back to course grit. No need to wear away al that knife blade. If it cuts ok on paper I'd just let it go and see if it works out with further sharpening down the road. Are you stropping the blade? Many times if these spots are close to fully sharp they will work themselves out with a couple strop sessions. Again, no need to wear all teat blade away. Strop the rest sharp. maybe strop just a bit more. And often after a few times the "spot" polishes out. BTW, are you using sandpaper or stones?
     
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  12. Kyle363

    Kyle363 Supporter Supporter

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    Shapton pro or glass stones get to those crazy high grits but I don't usually bring my knives to stones that fine. For one the stones are crazy expensive and only really need to be used on straight razors. I usually stop on stones around 8000 grit then move onto stropping with diamond paste on leather with a hard backing. I usually stop at 1 micron (14,000 grit) but can go all the way to .25 micron (64,000 grit) if need be. Bush knives and axes usually stop around 8,000 grit.

    You can have edges of the same thickness but different levels of sharpness usually people say the finer edges loose their initial super sharp edge quickly then then they hold a good sharp edge for a while. It all comes down to what steel and heat treat are used as well. There are tons of debates on the internet as to which steels are better for fine edges or coarse edges.
     
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  13. M.Hatfield

    M.Hatfield Midnight Joker Supporter

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    Most of my daily users, folders included, have a convex edge or at least a scandi grind.

    Because of my preference, I have a wide variety of strops and stropping surfaces. They range from 400 grit to 10,000 grit for polishing an edge.

    Completely restoring an edge is done by some ceramic bench stones I have or a Gossman Survival Tool in the field.

    So far, my systems work well for what I have.
     
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  14. Top Gibson

    Top Gibson Supporter Supporter

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    I like to hone after use....instead of sharpening. Ceramic, steel, strop....
     
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  15. FreudianSlip

    FreudianSlip Guide

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    I use a Japanese water stone up to 3000 grit and then strop using bark river white compound. They all shave and work well for me. I’ll probably get one more Japanese water stone around 5000 and call it good.
     
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