Silky vs Corona Saws IMHO

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by UAHiker, Feb 27, 2018.

  1. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    i've had a corona saw for several years now and for $20 i think it's a great saw. i've heard so many things about silky's i finally found one on sale through amazon and decided to pick it up, spent around $30 for it. So here's my honest comparisons between them. I am by no expert when it comes to saws and these are just my opinions.

    The saws:

    Corona :
    10" curved
    Locks in open and closed positions - note there is a little movement when closed and locked
    all plastic with some rubberized area for handle

    Silky Gomboy 210mm:
    ~7" straight
    locks only in open position
    all metal with rubber surrounding handle area

    clearly corona bigger than silky but it is 3" longer
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    teeth pretty much identical
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    saw thickness is pretty much identical. i didn't take my calipers to it....
    [​IMG]

    when closed silky saw is completely hidden vs corona which shows a little teeth
    [​IMG]

    when closed and tried to open. corona stops at the point shown where the silky won't. basically as i mentioned corona locks when closed
    [​IMG]

    the biggest difference i can tell between the saws is one's all plastic body, other is all metal body. the blade is straight vs curved. now you can also get a corona straight blade as well. if your into just cutting wood the curved blade doesn't matter. if you want to do precise cuts for notches or what not then the curved blade makes it difficult and i'd go with a straight blade.

    each saw cuts like a dream, extremely sharp and a joy to use. from what i can tell cut pretty much equally well with out a noticeable difference

    i've seen a video where a guy says "he can not, will not recommend a corona" because at -30F it fell off the bed of his truck and broke.... ok, if you don't live where it doesn't get that cold then no worries. it just bugs me he won't recommend it just because it's made out of plastic, put a disclaimer on it for peat sake! i've used mine in the 20's and lower with out a problem but than again where i live i don't get that low unless it's with windchill.

    IMHO corona's for the $$ is worth it's weight in gold. as far as a i can tell silky and corona source their blades from the same vendor and just mount them on different bodies. of course plastic is going to be cheaper then metal. you can plastic inject the handle and get say 4 handles for every injection vs 1 metal handle which is probably going to require multiple steps to make.

    if you hate plastic go with the metal handle, if one feels weird in your hand go with the other one. but for me personally they both feel good in my hand and cut the exact same. like i said biggest difference is curved vs straight and plastic vs metal. i'll use both, enjoy them equally and all depends on what i want to do on which one i pick, untimely it's up to YOU decide on what YOU want to do! please don't let someone tell you one thing is better than another with out trying it for yourself. we all have our opinions and this one is mine :)

    just remember if your out for speed of cutting through wood with everything else being equal. the longer the blade the longer your stroke, the more material removed per stroke which means the faster you'll go through the material....
     
  2. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    Great comparison! I've heard that they are comparable in cutting ability as well, so this lines up with other comments that I've read. Both are great power-cutters.
     
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  3. Muleman77

    Muleman77 Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter

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    Id pretty much agree, having used both a lot. Komelon as well, about identical to corona in price and quality.
    I like the feel of silky more for sure
     
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  4. WILL

    WILL Scout

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    For small, portable back-pack saws, I'm all about the weight. That's why I haven't sprung for a Silky yet....all metal= more weight.
     
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  5. fishhunter904

    fishhunter904 Tracker

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    Silky all day for weight and quality, however don't have anything bad to say about the corona as far as a "get started saw". Great write up and comparison very detailed!
     
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  6. Red Yeti

    Red Yeti Mostly Harmless Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Nice review friend, thanks!

    The silky has a stainless steel blade. I have that one and I really like it.

    Anybody know if the Corona is stainless too? I like that in a saw for field use, keeps the friction low for easier sawing.
     
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  7. Leshy_apprentice

    Leshy_apprentice Scout

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    Great write up! I'll add one note about the Corona. The handle is all plastic, BUT there is a metal insert reinforcing the pivot where the saw hinges. At least there was a metal reinforcement installed there when I bought my saw several years ago. I'd assume design is still the same (can't make it out in your photos)? The metal there provides a more solid stop for the extended blade. Cheaper manufacturers put no insert at all there. This makes the plastic hinge pivot a weak area where the back part of the saw blade digs into the plastic as the saw moves back and forth eventually contributing to failure at the seam of the two plastic halves of the handle near the pivot. Hard to explain in words. A picture is worth one kilo-word. You can see the metal insert liner thing. Without the metal insert, the back of the saw blade can work the 2 seam-joined plastic handle parts apart. Really hard to describe, but I've seen it happen on the really cheap generic all plastic pruning saws.
    IMG_20180227_152149313.jpg

    Can't speak for or against Silky, I've never used one. One thing I will say about an all metal handle on a cold day: if you're gripping metal in the cold and you're not wearing gloves, you're hands are going to freeze! There are pros and cons for all materials.

    I loved my Corona, it went through wood like a beast. Had it for years of use. Eventually the blade developed a crack halfway through. Customer service was not a help, so I used it until the blade finally broke all the way. As you can see from that photo above I kept the Corona handle because I like the ergonomics. Perhaps someday I'll mount a new saw blade in that handle. I've never seen that particular Corona blade offered for sale as a replacement bare blade only, with no handle.

    My Corona blade snapped last year, and I've replaced it with a 10" Fiskars folding saw. Haven't been out to test it in the field yet this year, but it'll be with me on my first trip coming up. Looks good quality. Similar aggressive triple ground teeth. Blade locks in a couple of different positions relative to the handle. Big reason I went elsewhere than the Corona for a replacement was exactly what you mentioned: the straight saw blade is much easier to make precise cuts like notches when needed compared to the Corona curved blade.

    https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-390470-1002-Power-Folding-10-Inch/dp/B00G8R9JZQ
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
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  8. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    yep mine has the metal inserts as well.

    one thing i noticed is replacement blades are almost same price as a new saw....

    btw. here is a link for a straight corona... it's 7" compared to 10"
    http://a.co/6DvZAi4
     
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  9. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Been using Corona saws personally and professionally for quite a few years. They are like the Mora's of saws in my opinion.
    I've never used a Silky.
     
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  10. 45jack

    45jack Supporter Supporter

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    Own both and both work. Agree with @MrFixIt about the Mora of saws for Corona, great value.
     
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  11. CHREBA

    CHREBA Guide

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    I learned about the Corona's after I brought the crowd favorite Bahco . My Corona has not dissapated me in any way what so ever . I have the seven and ten models .
     
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  12. hillst1

    hillst1 Scout

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    I love my Corona saw. I do not think the blades are the same. Silky are made in Japan and Corona in Mexico.
     
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  13. Foulwind

    Foulwind Guide

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    Have the Corona, and used it a few weeks back to prune up a large bush, and it cut the 3" and 4" branches and stumps like a chainsaw would have! I'm pleased its performance~
     
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  14. WILL

    WILL Scout

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    Just following up on this thread, I've exclusively used an $8 hardware store bow saw blade w/key rings for back-packing. I build the frame from a green branch and have used & abused it for years without issue. I also own a Laplander and have used it a bit. It hasn't replaced my bow saw blade because it's heavier, has a smaller cutting area and much smaller teeth which translates to slower cutting on smaller wood. Anything my Laplander can handle, my hatchet does faster and easier so why bother?

    I recently attended a bush-craft meet-up where a Laplander went head to head against a Silky. I was running the borrowed Silky because I always wanted to try one out. I promptly snapped its blade in half while sawing quickly. I felt terrible, and this is a prime example why not to loan out tools LOL. The owner was super cool about it, but informed me this isn't the first time that happened to him. He said one has to be careful with technique because the Silky blade is thin and breaks if bent. That experience has turned me off to Silky saws for anything other than yard work or a day hike. I guess I don't get the blade bend/break on my bow saw because it's tensioned from both ends.

    I know I'm probably going to get some ire from Silky owners here, but that's where I'm at right now. The more experience I get with this stuff, the more refined my gear choices get.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
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  15. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ I owned a Laplander for about a week- the Silky cut circles around it, not even remotely close- Corvair vs Corvette; mine has hours and hours of cutting an never an issue

    what I don't like about the Silky is the weight- I'll see if Corona has one in the size I'm interested in (Pocketboy)- sounds like it should be lighter with more plastic

    I've tried to retrofit a Silky blade in one of my older Fiskars w/ no luck
     
  16. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    I
    I have been cutting lots of thick fatwood. What had happened was my Silky Big Boy got gunked up. IMG_6254.JPG
    It made cutting really hard by its design. I got sloppy, cut my finger and bent the blade pretty good to where I was surprised it didnt break, but I knew I was on the threshold and how easy it would have been to do so. My Bahco Laplander didnt get gunked up and in the end was easier to cut the log.

    That being said, under normal conditions, my Silky will out perform other hand saws because it is easier for me which equals less calories burnt. Just have to remember to be methotical and cut from the pull.

    Silky may be more "fussy" but most sport cars require premium fuel ect. Dont want to take a sport car muddin, and thats what my Bahco is for
     
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  17. victoratsea

    victoratsea Supporter Supporter

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    A little denatured alcohol will clean that right up
     
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  18. Muleman77

    Muleman77 Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter

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    If I'm cutting fatwood with my handsaws, any of them, they get pretty sticky. The easiest thing I've done, is grab a dry limb of whatever is handy, and cut a few strokes in that when it gets gummy. It shines up enough to cut fine again, and you can do it every time you need too.
    Then alcohol or wd40 later to get it all off.
     
  19. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    I used some Goo Gone to clean fatwood resin off my old ( 2012) Corona 10" Razor-toothed folding saw. I've heard that hand sanitizer works too (which contains isopropyl alchohol). I recently acquired a Silky Pocketboy 170 to replace my aging Corona saw. I want to see what the all the hoopla is with Silky saws. I'll post my thoughts when I give the Pocket Boy a good workout soon. I do like the compactness and plastic carrying case that the Pocket Boy comes with though.....it fits perfectly in the outer hatchet sleeve of my recently acquired Hidden Woodsmen Atacs Haversack. I don't normally carry a hatchet so the case fits it perfectly. IMG_2530.JPG

    Dominick.........
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
  20. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    IMG_5007.JPG

    I misplaced mine. This is from last year. It has a short blade. This little tree took a bit out of me to cut but its not what it was made for
     
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  21. Zunga

    Zunga Guide

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    I haven't had the mossy oak in the pic long enough. To say it's reliable enough as a go to bush saw. It cuts better than my laplander did with the aggressive tòoth blade. The other two blades are great for craft purposes. Blades are quite thin but effective. Blade change is simple and secure. It comes with a molle compatible pouch. Amazon Canada price is $25. A good option as a craft saw and bush back up. My only complaint is choking up your grip. Can release the blade lock.
    20180215_081433.jpg
     
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  22. theJman

    theJman Scout

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    I've tried the Silky Pocketboy 130 and 170, but both of mine suffered the same fate that so many other Silky owners have endured; the blade tip broke almost immediately. Contacting the manufacturing got me nowhere so I'm done with that company. I don't know how their other products fare, but the Pocketboys are simply too fragile for me.
     
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  23. Midwest.Bushlore

    Midwest.Bushlore Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Weird! My Pocketboy is over a decade old and still going strong. It belonged to my dad before me so it's had a lot of miles on it. In total I've had Silky saws for over a decade (up to four of 'em now) and never have had any issues at all. User error? I've cut enough wood with mine to build a few houses!
     
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  24. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    blades may be made in different countries but i'm willing to bet design is the same and material is close if not exactly. once a patent runs out the design is free game for everyone then it all comes down to manufacturing.

    how do you carry your saw blade? for me i'm either too tired or don't want to bother making a saw after a hard day of hiking, all depends on what i do and my expectations :)

    you do have to be careful with them because of the thinness.

    i also completely agree the more experience i get with stuff the more refined my gear becomes and what i like
     
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  25. WILL

    WILL Scout

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    It's been my experience hiking the AT that any bare hand harvestable firewood is picked clean for hundreds of yards at the shelters. There's still plenty of larger wood that hikers without tools couldn't harvest. That's were the saw or ax shine. It's right there, I just have to cut it.


    I agree on being tired at the end of the day. I already have to set camp, clean myself up and make dinner, so time and energy levels are an issue. As far as building the saw from a green branch, it's actually super easy and relaxing for me. Takes me about 5 minutes of sitting and doing some finer woodworking. The more experience you get building them, the faster and easier they are. For me, it's actually nice to have an easy chore to occupy time while relaxing at camp. Sawing the wood is the hard part. If I have enough energy left over after hiking, I'll do it. If not, I can cook over my stove and go without the fire.


    My blade cover is made from a piece of 1/2 inch PVC I warmed and smooshed flat. It's cut just short of my saw blade length. I then relief cut most of it away to save weight. I slide my saw blade in there and put a key ring on each side to keep the blade from sliding out of the sheath ends while hiking. The blade sheath weighs 1.5 ounces. The blade, rings and sheath weigh a total of 3.8 ounces. The sheath project took me about 1/2 hour to complete and cost nothing as I had the PVC already.

    Here's how the saw is made...



    I don't even bother with all the crazy lashing. It's a one night tool, so twice or three times around with a short piece of paracord on each side will do it. Probably don't even need that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  26. junglas

    junglas Scout

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    How’d you clean that off?
     
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  27. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    Ive been busy and lazy and havent tried to clean it. When I do I will first cut into some wood and then use rubbing alcohol. A lot of people have recommended denatured alcohol.
     
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  28. Back Off

    Back Off Scout

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    Good thread, some great info. I too bought the traditional Laplander and I am not a fan. For smaller pruning projects maybe but it didnt perform well enough to make me not look at replacements. I have seen the silkys on a lot of videos and everyone talks about how great they are but then when you see the need for a lot of cutting they are breaking out bigger saws. I have herd good things about the Corona and will really look harder at picking one up especially at the price.
     
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  29. thereandbackagain

    thereandbackagain Scout

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    RE: Opening thread. To the reviewer who had one break falling out of his truck at minus 30? Buy a new truck.
     
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  30. junglas

    junglas Scout

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    I’m taking my Silky Bigboy backpacking this weekend. The trail camp we’re going to is heavily used so there’s no “low hanging fruit” when it comes to fire wood.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2018
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  31. pirogue

    pirogue Tracker

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    I have a few Silky saws ranging from the F180(plastic handles and light), to the telescoping Longboy. I think you get what you pay for, and would not consider anything else. Silky has plenty models to choose from.
     
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  32. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    I really wish they made a F130, love the Pocketboy, but it probably could weigh about half with the fiberglass body
     
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  33. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    Found out that the Pocketboy makes short work of cutting through schedule 80 PVC conduit the other day.
    I had to shorten a piece of 4" that was stubbed out of the ground, couldn't use the bandsaw as it was tight to the building and had cables in it.
    The Pocketboy blade fit between the pipe and the building and allowed a perfect ring cut. (I sleeved the cables with a piece of 3" steel pipe to protect them).
    The hardwood blade may have worked better, but that greenwood blade cut fast!
     

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