Skrama vs BK-9 vs Condor Mini Parang

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Greebe, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    7,961
    Location:
    MN
    I was able to participate in the Skrama pass-around this winter, and I really enjoyed it. This has got me to thinking again about adding a larger knife to my arsenal to possible use in place of an axe when going out for longer trips. Case in point is I will be doing a 7 day trip on an island next month. I will get there by taking a 3 hour boat charter which will drop me and a buddy off and not return until the set day a week later.

    I have been debating between the Skrama, Becker BK-9, and Condor Mini Duku Parang.

    I would like to be able to process wood for fires to cook on the whole trip. Make a few items for camp which will require carving, and also be able to use it for minimal food prep. Basically I would like a large knife that is good for most tasks that a small axe such as my GB Small Forest Axe, but weigh half as much. Then carry a smaller fixed blade such as a puukko or my BK-16

    I have only used the Skrama and I really liked it. More so then I thought I would. Only complaint with it was that with the straight handle it had a lot of hand shock chopping wood, especially when I cut down frozen 4" oak tree. The handle is a little long but does allow you to use two hands which can be nice. The overall package is nearly the weight of my GB SmFA, so that does not help me cut weight, which tends to make me think I would just take the axe instead.

    Then there is the venerable BK-9. I have been looking at these for years. Again thought I never bought one because I have not really been a large knife guy. However the 9 just looks like it would be sweet. This knife is in the middle range of weight, about 2 ounces lighter then the Skrama, but also just about an ounce heavier then the Parang.

    Last we have the Condor Mini Duku Parang. I have been eying this one for several years as well. It looks like it is the lightest of the three which is a plus as that would be the purpose of getting one of these is to save weight so that I can carry 6 days of food, but still be able to process wood for fires on my trip. I like the look and think that it would be pretty nice. It is also the least expensive of the three which is a big plus.

    Just looking for opinions on these three and what you guys think. Both the Skrama and the BK-9 are around $100, while the Condor can be picked up for $40 shipped. For me that is a big selling point as well as it is the lightest of all three and seems to chop as well if not perhaps better. Just not sure about the blade shape.

    So I am just looking for opinions on these three. What do you guys think?

    Skrama

    [​IMG]

    BK-9
    [​IMG]

    Condor Mini Duku Parang

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Derzis

    Derzis Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2017
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    769
    Location:
    Canada
    What you see when you look to a blade? I have the tendency to look for what can be done with the tool above the obvious things. And the Parang can be a spatula to turn a steak in the woods, a mini shovel if need be, a one/two handed slashing small-sword and a machete. From all 3, it is the most versatile for me based on blade shape alone. But the question is: Do I really need it?
     
  3. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    7,961
    Location:
    MN
    Thanks. Yeah, to me it would seem like the Parang would be the most versatile. As to your question, that is why I have yet to buy one. However for my trip coming up it seems like the parang paired with a BK-16 or 3" Puukko might be a nice thing to bring over an axe and knife. Actually the 3" Puukko and the Parang would weight less then the GB SmFA and then some, which would be nice as it seems like a great combo.
     
  4. Nakadnu

    Nakadnu OBSERVER Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    2
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2013
    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes Received:
    6,689
    Location:
    NE MT
    I own a skrama, use it and love it. I own a BK9 which I have not used but I do like the way it feels. It doesn't feel like a big knife. Well balanced I guess.
    I have no experience with the Condor Mini Duku Parang. But from past experience with other big knives I avoid choppers with wooden handles. For example, I had a wood handled 8" Ex Ghurka house kukri that the handle split on while batoning.
    That's all I got.
     
  5. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2012
    Messages:
    5,327
    Likes Received:
    11,414
    Location:
    KC Metro
    If it were me, I would get the mini duku. But I already have a nice traditional kukri and a more modern kukri style knife, so the mini duku would kind of fill the gap with traditional styled village tools. Looking at the BK9 it reminds me of a modern day Hudson Bay.
     
    Torrin and woodsmanjohn like this.
  6. tobiism

    tobiism Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2013
    Messages:
    3,413
    Likes Received:
    12,039
    Location:
    Chandler AZ
    If you want I will loan you a BK9, a BK4 Machax, and a BK20 to take with you. They are three of the best choppers in the Becker lineup. Just so you can see how they stack up.
     
  7. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    7,961
    Location:
    MN
    Wow thanks for the offer. That sounds great. I will send you a message later as I am in the process of trying to get about 20 pages written for an economic paper that needs to go out in a few hours. Yeah!

    Thanks
    Greebe
     
    woodsmanjohn and MrFixIt like this.
  8. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    7,961
    Location:
    MN
    Well that is stupid. Took a break from writing to order the Condor, had found it on Amazon for $37 something and change, then went back to it just now and still showed that much, but when I logged out of my wifes account and onto mine, now they are $85. WTF? Should have ordered it on hers before they changed the price. Gerrrrrr. That kind of ticks me off, now I am just grump! :mad:
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2017
  9. Kona9

    Kona9 Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2016
    Messages:
    1,662
    Likes Received:
    6,807
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    The Skrama is pretty sweet as you know from being a part of the pass around. I got mine a week or so back and I find it to be a very versatile tool. Almost makes my GB SFA seem redundant, almost. The only issue I see is timing as you only have a month and if it gets hung up in customs you never know.
     
    woodsmanjohn and freebirdfb like this.
  10. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    4
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2008
    Messages:
    41,343
    Likes Received:
    12,171
    Location:
    Texas
    Have not used a mini duku, but have used and owned several condors. Like the Beckers better. BK9 is a very effective chopper and the steel is excellent.
     
  11. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2012
    Messages:
    5,327
    Likes Received:
    11,414
    Location:
    KC Metro
    I was wondering where you saw them at half off. Sucky timing.
     
  12. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    7,961
    Location:
    MN
    Well I got done writing my paper and headed out to the shop to make my own chopper. Decided I didn't need to buy something when I could make something. I will start a separate thread. :D
     
    WILL, Kinggoat, MrFixIt and 2 others like this.
  13. tobiism

    tobiism Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2013
    Messages:
    3,413
    Likes Received:
    12,039
    Location:
    Chandler AZ
    Now thats the spirit!!!!
     
    MrFixIt, Greebe and freebirdfb like this.
  14. CHREBA

    CHREBA Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2017
    Messages:
    1,177
    Likes Received:
    4,322
    Location:
    Northeast Woodlands
    I can't vouch for any of them except the Duku . I'm of a different mind set when it comes to chopping with knives . I believe some knife styles have evolved by necessity to be choppers and others just happen to be decent at chopping . The Malaysian blades were/are by design purpose built to excel at chopping task as well as other every day uses over a very long time . The Seax style blades have the same history as an multi purpose tool . I feel by design the BK9 is a great knife but is it comparable . I can't honestly say , but as my Daddy says "Every body don't tell the same lie" ?
     
  15. batmanacw

    batmanacw Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    4,137
    Likes Received:
    11,422
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    If you do a search on my name and Condor Mini Duku you can find my thread on mine. There is no comparison. The Duku is awesome. Use the Rooster method to sharpen it and it will blow you away. Don't press hard so it will keep the convex nice and thin with no secondary bevel. I chopped through 6" of dry maple and it still shaved hair.
     
    ROCK6 likes this.
  16. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    1,400
    Location:
    UK
    This is my take. All three have a different feel. All are very similar in weight between 1lbs and 1.2lbs blade only. They are all made of great steel and properly heat treated.
    The Skrama you have used, its what I use in the forest.
    Its been a while since I've used a BK9, not mine. The BK9 is shorter and thicker, and a has an excellent reputation. In the hand it has a heavier feel though it very slightly lighter, and thats because its stouter, made of thicker stock. A good bit shorter so a tad less reach. The grind is different so its less "catch the cut" keen; still sharp, but not quite the same bite. It doesn't have the heft to compete with an axe. Its quite tough enough to beat most things into submission, even breeze blocks. I would be more than happy to use it in both urban and forest environments.
    The Condor Parang is the lightest and thinnest stock of the three. Good reach. I haven't used one but have use parangs a lot, "village" and use my Ben Orford Erban snedding Parang custom which is as beefed up as really they should go on this size:
    [​IMG]

    Parangs are best for green wood or jungle. They are best kept very keen. They really don't compete well with an axe and will give a lot of feedback on hard woods. Not much use in the urban environment. In the right place they excel, as they can be worked for hours. They can be choked up to finer tasks, well there is a way, and I like them a lot. They aren't too weight forward committed because they aren't heavy, and rely on speed. The heavier built the less well they work.
    Condor handles tend to get damaged from battening and wrong use. (Its because Condor doesn't know enough about knife reality real work, just how to feed their target market. I'm sure they will flame me for that comment. I'm annoyed because they are so close to getting it right.)

    Non of the three compete with a hatchet or axe. They just don't have the weight nor focus enough of what they have. Non can tackle efficiently much more than 4" wood, really 3" or less. (Why does anyone need to tackle more than 4" with such a tool?) The BK9 has a tough grind for hard wood but still doesn't get far with a lot of effort. I like some reach for thicket, nettles, bramble and reed. I also like a deep cut if its not going to be an axe. Once I tackle hard wood, oak, I reach for a saw or axe, and don't use it much other that what can be found to feed a fire.
    I brought into the conversation uban environment, because there prybar techniques come in. Smash, lever out, and break down things. A different world to forests.
    Lastly, weight forwardness. Classic blades that are big tend to be weight forward. That has a huge influence in control especially when checking the force once through a material. When tired reaction times slow so control is more difficult. Its one reason I like he Skrama as it give me a huge amount of control.

    So all three are good. I know what I like, and I do believe it might be the least expensive.


    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  17. sweet trav

    sweet trav Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    1,491
    Location:
    ...the panhandle...and loving it!
    Anyone have info on how the skrama handle compares to the bk9 handle?

    Im trying to stick to hatchets for choppers but that skrama is interesting...and the kydex setup in the vendor section is very nice!
     
  18. BalsamFur

    BalsamFur Not a duck Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,171
    Likes Received:
    20,558
    Location:
    SW Michigan
    Hang on. I'll get you some pics.

    EDIT
    Here you go. One's bigger. Lol!
    0902181954~2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
  19. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2017
    Messages:
    666
    Likes Received:
    1,835
    Location:
    Central Texas
    I like Skrama but I like Paramus as well. Don’t have BK9 but similar. The one thing about large knives that aggravates me is that part of the blade past the sweet spot is useless for chopping except that if you got rid of it the sweet spot would move back. Axes solve this problem by using wooden handles.

    So what to do? Use the forward portion for something else. Sacrifice that part and use it for whacking roots and the like, or if it’s long enough use it a little like a walking stick. Or sharpen it and use curved part (if there is one) for skinning.
     
    woodsmanjohn likes this.
  20. 1066vik

    1066vik Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3,670
    Likes Received:
    2,862
    Location:
    NE Ks
    I didn't realize the handle on the skrama was that long -- now I really want one, but I may go with the bare blade version and add a birch bark handle.
     
  21. The Warrior

    The Warrior Architect of Fire

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Messages:
    4,094
    Likes Received:
    4,038
    Location:
    Not in the woods....damn.
    Looks like it would even fit your mitts.
     
    woodsmanjohn and 1066vik like this.
  22. OldFatMan

    OldFatMan Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2018
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    672
    ( yup, I see that it's necroed... just trying to be helpful )

    I own all 3, and 2 of the 3 are in my top 5 big choppers, the last 3 spots being taken by an Aranyik cleaver style chopper I have, and a traditional Kuk from HI that's 20 inch blade and 64oz.... it will quite literally out chop most axes...and the BK21 kuk shaped object....

    the BK9 left out of the top 5, comes in as honorable mention at number 6....

    I tend to over pack for the woods, I use a small axe, folding saw, big knife, and small knife ( not counting a multi tool and small folding knife as well )

    The big knife in my use, is simply there to baton wood, I find it safer than trying to do so with the axe....

    sorry, got side tracked... anywho...

    The Condor mini duku is a fantastic knife, but like all condors it needs a lot of love right out of the box.... the handles are generally too thick for anyone other than a sasquatch, too round for anyone without G.I. Joe's Kung Fu grip....and the edges could use some touching up unless you are intending to use it to smear peanut butter on toast....then its probably sufficient...

    AFTER that.... and adding some oil to the wood handle to rehydrate it and reduce its brittleness and change to crack in use.... they are FANTASTIC blades....

    The BK9 is likely the best option of my top 10 for my actual use of the knife... I just like to carry something other than what 99.98257% of everyone else who carries a big chopper into the woods carries... its stupidly comfortable in the hands once you swap out to the factory micarta handles, replace the screws with stainless, and replace the carry system ( factory sheath is ...... not good )

    The Scrama is.... STUPIDLY good for the price, I love the long handle, choking back for chopping, choking up for detail work, its seriously, fantastic.... but IMHO its designed to try and be a 1 tool option...

    IF I were headed into the woods, with 2 knives, a large and small.....and the large would replace my axe....of the 3, the Scrama would be my first choice..... the duku is a touch too light for me to get good penetration while chopping with it like I do the scrama....that extra ounce or two of weight, combined with the long handle and ability to choke back for a chop stroke just makes the scrama out preform the other 2 by a VERY wide margin

    Now... the BK9 will baton and split better once the wood is down and sectioned up into camp fire length pieces ( I do that with a silky gomboy ) but in the case of having to harvest wood, which MAY include felling small trees or large limbs, then sectioning into campfire sized pieces, man..... that's A LOT of chopping.... any of them will split, some better than others, but really, that's a very small difference, and the small knife will handle everything else... so really you are looking for a chopper to replace an axe.... and the scrama IMHO is the only one of those 3 with a chance in hell of even coming close.

    just my opinion.... I figger a lot of folks will disagree..... I also know that this is a necro thread, you have built your own knife, the trip is over, and this is all wasted words..... but its late, I cant sleep, back hurts tonight, so I had time to reply in case someone else was interested as the thread was on the first page and thus....quasi current.
     
  23. fishiker

    fishiker Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    899
    Location:
    VA
    The BK9 is a knife I didn't expect to like. I was offered one in a trade that was too good to pass so I decided to give it a chance. It may not chop as well as the heavier blades I own or do fine work as well as a Mora but it is capable of doing everything I normally need. I still have the first one and have since added another with micarta handle scales and a kydex sheath.
     
  24. kronin323

    kronin323 Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    806
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Hmmm, I was searching on this subject and since this necro thread was already bumped I figure keeping it going doesn't hurt...

    I don't really care about the Condor but I am interested in the Skrama vs. BK9. I do think my desired function would be more around chopping and batoning than general purpose but I could be convinced that the general purpose is the better choice if it works well enough at chopping and batoning.

    I've been leaning towards the Skrama but have to seriously consider the BK9. I appreciate @OldFatMan's recent input, which reinforces my favoring of the Skrama.

    But anybody else's input is welcome, too. In particular, @BalsamFur, you posted that side-by-side pic earlier. It looks like your BK9 has seen a lot more use. Is that because you've had it longer or because you prefer it over the Skrama? Which one did you get first, why did you get the other, which one do you use more now; what's the story?
     
    JasonJ, OldFatMan, Primordial and 3 others like this.
  25. BalsamFur

    BalsamFur Not a duck Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,171
    Likes Received:
    20,558
    Location:
    SW Michigan
    I've only had the Skrama for a couple of weeks, and haven't had much time to play with it. One thing I can tell you, it's a chopping beast!
    0909181530.jpg
    0909181532.jpg

    I'll get back to shortly with more thoughts on the topic. Dinner bell's ringing.
     
    JasonJ, Madwell, OldFatMan and 7 others like this.
  26. woodsranger

    woodsranger Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    1,215
    Location:
    Michigan
    I've had both. The stock handles on the BK9 are very slick, whereas the handle on the Skrama is grippy. I don't think there's anything the BK9 can do that the Skrama can't, though being shorter the BK9 is easier to pack.
     
  27. HunterX9

    HunterX9 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2017
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    1,346
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    I love the skrama. I got it in stainless and it’s a work horse. Similar to the parang I have the locknessmuk from condor and I love the weight and shape but the handle for me is a little too rounded.
     
    Madwell, OldFatMan, Broke and 4 others like this.
  28. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    4,291
    Likes Received:
    20,004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I just ordered a skrama. Thanks guys :rolleyes: lol

    I'll be adding my own handle, as the blank was all that was available in carbon, but I've been meaning to try my hand at another handle anyway.
    Now to choose some kydex material...
     
    Madwell, OldFatMan, HunterX9 and 3 others like this.
  29. J. Pierce

    J. Pierce Perpetually Off Topic, Sorry. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2013
    Messages:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    9,671
    Location:
    Wisconsin, the north end
    It slices, dices, chops, purees, and even peels!

    IMG_20180909_132626115.jpg
     
    Fat Old Man, Elwha, JasonJ and 13 others like this.
  30. SkipJunkie

    SkipJunkie Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    544
    I just gonna comment for the heck of it . I see that there was some axe comparison in the thread . While I only own one of the fore meñtiomend tools being questioned what I can say is this I own a few large blades . In my humble opinion none of them compare to an axe . But the only one that will compare truly to a non knife wood chopping tool/hatchet is my Nepalese Kukri . Again just my experience based on tools I've actually handled .
     
  31. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    4,291
    Likes Received:
    20,004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    My Goluk and my Kukri are, IMO, excellent choppers.
    It will be interesting to see how the Skrama compares to an axe from all that's been said about it.
     
  32. SkipJunkie

    SkipJunkie Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    544
    I agree , interested I am . I'm very much opened to being impressed by any axe/hatchet like conpacomparison .
     
  33. BalsamFur

    BalsamFur Not a duck Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,171
    Likes Received:
    20,558
    Location:
    SW Michigan
    I've had the BK9 for many years, and loved it. I often camp in dense cedar thickets, and a big choppity knife is helpful to clear low branches from camp, providing walking-around room and easy kindling. I also use it to baton birch logs for my cooking fire. One of the great things about the BK9 is that when it's not chopping, it behaves much like a smaller knife. On my last outing I used it to make tarp stakes, a pot hook, and feather sticks. My smaller knife hardly left its sheath. Why did I buy the Skrama? Curiosity. I wanted to see if there was something better. Don't tell my BK9 this, but I think been outclassed slightly by the Skrama. For chopping, the Skrama has the mechanical advantage of a longer handle. Plus, while the blades are the same length, the shape of the Skrama brings more of its cutting edge into a chopping stroke. You lose the curved tip edge of the BK9, but if you're not processing game I don't think you'll miss it. True, @SkipJunkie , neither would replace an axe, but for chopping with a knife, the Skrama is pretty dang good. The weight of the BK9 and Skrama are so close I can't really tell which is heavier. Check out the balance:

    0909181551~2.jpg
    0909181553.jpg
    They're pretty close, with the Skrama's being slightly closer to the grip. There's also that 2in section of bevel that's ground at a sharper angle for finer cuts. Maybe that's a gimmick. It's too soon to tell. Other comparisons? The Skrama's grip is molded from a hard rubber-like material. It's grippy without being squishy. You can't replace it like the scales on the BK9. A lot of people don't like the Becker stock scales. I rough mine up with sandpaper and try not to think about it. The sheath situation is interesting.
    0909181555~2.jpg
    The Becker sheaths are serviceable, but just barely. I've never had a problem because the BK9 has always been my pack knife. I don't wear it on my belt. The Skrama comes with a simple, sturdy molded plastic slipper, or you can upgrade and get the sexy black leather, which still uses the same plastic cover on the inside.
    Did I leave anything out? Feel free to post more questions. I'll do my best to give helpful answers.
     
  34. J. Pierce

    J. Pierce Perpetually Off Topic, Sorry. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2013
    Messages:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    9,671
    Location:
    Wisconsin, the north end
    I'd say the Skrama is similar to my Wildlife hatchet chopping wise, but I've carried my hatchet more. Only because I've owned it longer. The hatchet is a little better chopper, but a way worse knife. Tradeoffs.....
    I've never done a head to head test, but I think they are somewhat interchangeable, depending on if you need more axe function or more knife function.
    But no knife will compare with a full size axe.
     
  35. SkipJunkie

    SkipJunkie Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    544
    Anything other than the correct tool for the job is going to have a trade off . What a wonderful time we live in that we have tools that can realistically cross those boundaries with only the most miniscule of short comings . We have options that the brave men that settled this land did not . Think of what they might have accomplished with the tools we have at our disposals ???
     
  36. J. Pierce

    J. Pierce Perpetually Off Topic, Sorry. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2013
    Messages:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    9,671
    Location:
    Wisconsin, the north end
    Excellent point.
    Makes me feel kind of silly about even wasting my time trying to decide which knife to take.
    Those guys just took the knife.
     
    Primordial, holygoat, Madwell and 4 others like this.
  37. Broke

    Broke I found my hat! Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2016
    Messages:
    5,467
    Likes Received:
    33,035
    Location:
    Blue Springs, mo
    Being a big guy I find the grip on the bk9 to be too short for me. Would be fine on a shorter blade, but, a longer blade needs more hand room. The Skrama has a long, comfortable grip with 3.5 grip zones, a choked up hold, a full length big work zone, a 2 finger whip/snap cut grip and for the petite of paw a 2 hand hold, for the bigguns, 1.5 hand hold.
    All I have used mine for this far is chopping, and a it's a beast! Hope to do some shavings/feathers and batonning with it soon.
    I am no longer looking for a junglas.
     
  38. OldFatMan

    OldFatMan Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2018
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    672
    I've added a handle to a few, I've found it best to take a flat file and remove the humps on the spine ( there are a couple of raised areas designed to keep the slip fit rubber grip from sliding off, they become problematic when rehandleing with a more ridged material ) .... after you get a true flat on the tang sides.... both upper and lower, you will want to move on to drilling the holes for pins. QUALITY bits in a drill press help, but it can be done freehand with a hand drill and some cutting oil.

    The tang once the handle humps are removed will be too.... narrow ..... to make a comfortable handle.... it would be very much like trying to use a popsicle stick for an axe handle.... you'll want to lay out your wood slabs, in whatever shape feels best to you're specific hand... TYPICALLY i'll use overly thick handle scales.... you will want to sand 1 of the 2 handle slabs down minus the thickness of the tang.....so it will lay flat against the side of the tang and make like a lid for the other handle slab.... the thicker one, you need to carefully remove a layer of wood from the inside the thickness of the tang....could use a chisel or something...I trace the shape I need to remove, insert a side cutting blade in my drill press, set it for depth, lower it down, and carefully mill out that inside trough for the tang to lay in.... mark holes for pins and drill em..... add epoxy, clamshell the 2 halves together, and pin....

    essentially you are making a 2 piece construction slab side hidden tang......

    that's the only way I've found to end up with a handle that's wide and thick enough for MY hand, without going to an even more fancy 3 layer slab side hidden tang with the middle layer being the same thickness as the tang itself.... that might prove easier for you, might not.... it was more pain for me than it was worth due to the need to secure that middle layer with something more than glue to have it hold up long term IMHO and the handle pins not actually making contact with that middle layer...

    not sure any of that made any sense at all LOL.....sorry, just trying to be helpful....
     
  39. 1066vik

    1066vik Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3,670
    Likes Received:
    2,862
    Location:
    NE Ks
    ordered a blade blank - thinking it needs a stacked birch bark handle.
     
    buckfynn, Broke and OldFatMan like this.
  40. OldFatMan

    OldFatMan Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2018
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    672
    To be honest, I'm VERY worried about tear out on a birch bark handle....the tang is large enough, and with enough shoulder, that when chopping....which is kinda the strong suite of the knife....I think the impact would eventually drive the tang wedgeways thru the bark handle and cause a total failure. With the longer handle style of this knife, you will not be holding or swinging it like you would say....a more traditional leuku. You'll be putting a lot more stress on the middle portion of the handle due to better leverage. The leuku handle is fully supported by the hand during a chop.. the skrama handle is going to want to pivot and rock...this is what gives it greater chopping ability, but also generates different stresses in the handle materials than what you would experience with a more traditional knife shaped chopper. I'm not exactly sure I possess the ability to convey the differences I'm talking about so that anyone else can understand what I mean.....frustrating...

    IF I were to try something of that style, I'd opt for attempting a stacked leather washer handle instead.....and make sure you round off the spine of the tang on both sides with a file to remove any sharp edges.

    make a circle cutter from a piece of metal pipe of the size you want...grind in a cutting bevel on the leading tip....cut out your leather disks, use an oval shaped hole punch ( pretty cheap off the Amazing River sight ) they make them to cut slots for different crafts .....should be easy and end up very functional, traditional looking, and feel great.... stacked leather would go a long way to absorbing and diffusing any chopping related hand shock...

    just my 0.02...

    random internet pic of mentioned slot cutter....they make these in 100 different sizes or more, different highth and width combinations...should be able to find one to exactly fit the profile of a Skrama tang once the humps are filed down flat and the edges rounded off to minimize tear out due to repeated impact.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2018
    holygoat, JasonJ, 1066vik and 3 others like this.
  41. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    4,291
    Likes Received:
    20,004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania

    That made perfect sense. Thanks.

    I had picked up some felt because someone in another thread suggested using it as the filler between the scales. Before I simply dribbled Acra-Glas into the void where needed, which seems to be holding up fine. I had wondered if milling out a slot was another method... and now I know :)

    I haven't decided which way I'm going to go yet. Good to have two options.
     
    Broke, buckfynn and OldFatMan like this.
  42. 1066vik

    1066vik Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3,670
    Likes Received:
    2,862
    Location:
    NE Ks
    OFM - you may be right, but I think it may still be worth trying.
    if it doesn't hold up, all I'm out is some time -- and I'll be generating a LOT of tinder while I'm at it. :)
     
    OldFatMan and Broke like this.
  43. Broke

    Broke I found my hat! Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2016
    Messages:
    5,467
    Likes Received:
    33,035
    Location:
    Blue Springs, mo
    I have a question, specific to putting a leather or birch handle on the Skrama.
    It has a large ring on the pommel, the ring is wider than the tang, how do you compensate? Fill the void with epoxy?
    Also, a leather handle on this knife would be nice, similar shock absorbing to the rubber, but classier in appearance.
     
  44. 1066vik

    1066vik Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3,670
    Likes Received:
    2,862
    Location:
    NE Ks
    with leather I could stretch it past the ring - with birch bark I'll either need to oversize the slot in each piece a little, or flatten the sides of the ring slightly -- maybe both.
    I'm thinking antler bolster and possibly a crown for the pommel end.
     
    OldFatMan and Broke like this.
  45. Broke

    Broke I found my hat! Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2016
    Messages:
    5,467
    Likes Received:
    33,035
    Location:
    Blue Springs, mo
    You so crazy Erik! Cant wait to see the final product! That water stone set is totes awesome for sharpening, thanks for that.
     
    Primordial, OldFatMan and 1066vik like this.
  46. 1066vik

    1066vik Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3,670
    Likes Received:
    2,862
    Location:
    NE Ks
    good to hear!
     
    OldFatMan and Broke like this.
  47. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    5,292
    Likes Received:
    7,218
    Location:
    ATL
    I've thought about just cutting the ring off and replacing the rubber with a shorter handle. a lanyard tube drilled further down the grip would secure everything...
     
    OldFatMan and Broke like this.
  48. Broke

    Broke I found my hat! Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2016
    Messages:
    5,467
    Likes Received:
    33,035
    Location:
    Blue Springs, mo
    It is a rather large ring, not entirely necessary, I have been wondering of it would be useful for straightening arrow shafts?
     
    OldFatMan and ra2bach like this.
  49. kronin323

    kronin323 Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    806
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I'm more into practicality than aesthetics but a stacked leather handle Skrama sound awesome!!! I'll never do one myself but if anyone does I'd LOVE to see pics...

    But I also hope the custom handle continues to support the multiple grip positions that the OEM one does. That seems to be one of the value-adds of this stock knife compared to the BK9...
     
    OldFatMan, BalsamFur and Broke like this.
  50. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    5,292
    Likes Received:
    7,218
    Location:
    ATL
    I don't know the purpose of the ring but it's not a bad thing to have on there, just unnecessary, IMO.

    the hole through the blade above the point, however, I have tried using a stick through it to assist using it as a draw knife and it works well. I really like this tool...
     

Share This Page