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sleep/shelter system for daypack

Discussion in 'Sleep Systems' started by mtwarden, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    Even if I had a smartphone I'd still rather use a dedicated GPS over an app. I prefer the fact that they're rugged and importantly waterproof. I'm using an old PN-20. I also still have an old yellow e-trex.
     
  2. Burncycle

    Burncycle Tracker

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    Just bought one of those SOL Escape bivys. I saw a youtube review in which a guy used a garden hose to test it and a little water got through, so I seam-sealed the seams inside, and sprayed the bottom and outside seams with Atsko silicone water guard. This makes the bottom non-breathable but should be more water resistant, and the top is still breathable so I'm hoping it doesn't condensate too much, though here in the southeast the humidity is so high all the time it probably will anyway!

    If they made a "pro" version of the Escape Bivy (seam-sealed, face hood like MSS Bivy and a covers overhanging the zipper) I would have purchased that.

    Overall though it's nice and compact when stored, I figured I could use it stand alone here in the summer and during spring/fall in conjunction with a bag.
     
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  3. The Woodsrunner

    The Woodsrunner Bush Nerd Hobbyist

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  4. Denman

    Denman Scout

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    I could use some thing like that,great Idea.
     
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  5. Denman

    Denman Scout

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    Me too,it just makes since.
     
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  6. Traditionalist

    Traditionalist Scout

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    Great idea using the UCO reppans. I've got all three sizes/models but apparently wasn't smart enough to notice the built in safety of using them as a Palmer furnace. I do use my large one during the winter to keep the frost knocked off the ceiling of my Hillie Soulo.

    I've got both an HPG Mtn. Serape and a Wiggys poncho liner. Either one would be good with a candle (more) safely between my legs. I'd never considered this before due to the "if things go wrong, they'll go really wrong" philosophy, and not wanting to go from hypothermic to on fire all in one night.

    How much heat output difference have you noticed between the 8hr and the tealight lanterns? I'm weighing (pun) the advantages of the 8hr continual burn and rationing my matches/lighters in a survival situation vs. the weight/bulk savings of the mini tealight lantern. The mini is probably also less tippy between the knees. Thoughts?
     
  7. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    One advantage of carrying the UCO small tea light lantern is while producing warmth you can also heat up small 6 0z. tuna can or similar size cup of water on top of it to just below the boiling point in about 45 min. for a drink of warming pine needle tea.
     
  8. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    Thanks!

    Huge difference in warmth - I bought the mini thinking the same thoughts, but was disappointed - later found that UCO specs them as 1900 and 450 BTU, respectively, and that feels about right. The Mini might be better in above freezing conditions, if you don't want get too hot, but own body heat is fine at that point.

    FWIW, I run a "draft" when using one in my Woobie Express to keep fumes from my face - seal my collar tight, crack an air intake by one foot, and an air exhaust by the opposite armhole.

    A HPG Serape should be really nice to use with this - lots more fabric/coverage to vary position. I think using low chairs (eg Alite Mayfly) is viable for you.
     
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  9. Traditionalist

    Traditionalist Scout

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    I had a hunch but WOW, I wouldn't have guessed the original has four times the output of the mini. I guess the mini will just remain my cute little inexpensive hanging campfire then. My original size UCO is aluminum so it's not a back-breaker to carry along anyway. I also have a brass one also because it's got exponential charm for times that weight isn't an concern, so that makes my aluminum one the default "gram counter's" choice..................even though they'd probably disagree. ;)

    Great idea about creating a draft away from your face.
     
  10. Traditionalist

    Traditionalist Scout

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    Thanks for the tip. I've got a Snow Peak 600Ti that I love. Using your suggestion, and given the fact the tea lights cost nothing, and weight slightly more, I'm considering building some sort of pot stand/windscreen combo (I know they're out there already) for heating a cup when time isn't an issue. I small stack of tealights could then both provide atmosphere and heat my coffee.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
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  11. Herman30

    Herman30 Tracker

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    I have a NVA strichtarn canvas poncho/shelter half. It is very good windproof and fairly well waterproof and not very heavy = 1.5kg. Size 175cm x 175cm.

    Found out that it can be buttoned together on two sides so that it forms a sack. Thus can it be used as a windproof sack to sit in during lunchbreak or as an emergency sleeping bag if the day hike turns into an overnighter.
    And if a thin, lightweight fleece linerbag is brought along it further increases the warmth when used as a sleeping bag. And of course it can also be used as a tarp.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Guide Bushclass I

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    In my day kit, carried either in my Polish bread bag, or a USGI sustainment pouch rigged with a shoulder strap. I carry a grabber space blanket (OD green on one side), a Wally World backpaker 5 x 7 tarp, several hanks of bankline and 6 lightweight stakes.

    Never had to use it in an inopportune emergency night. But I use the grabber as a tarp, and the 5 x 7 as a ground cover. Makes a great shade for sudden rain or relaxing while making and eating lunch on our day outings.I also pack a standard space blanket as well.
     
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  13. Jean

    Jean Guide

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    Where did you find the btu reference from UCO?
     
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  14. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    Sorry, I seemed to have missed this one.

    The BTUs are listed on the packaging:

    Micro

    Original
     
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  15. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Backing up a little
    I don't often hitch-hike these days but I got stuck during the ski season and had to.
    Got stuck at the side of the road just before midnite and had to sleep rough.
    Warm enough I guess but uncomfortable, very uncomfortable; at my age I'm thinking that underbody comfort may have more to do with survival than I'd previously given credence to.
    So I am saving for a LW 3/4 length airmat; either the S2S or the Neo-Air. Either of these take up the same room as a Nalgene but probably worth the space.
    YMMV
     
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  16. jeremyctry

    jeremyctry Outdoorsman Bushclass I

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    I'm working on slowly upgrading son of my kit to UL components, but for some reason I'm extremely reluctant to retire my USGI Gore-Tex bivy indestructible and no need for tarp but it is heavy.
     
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  17. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    agreed that what's under you effects greatly on how warm you're going to be- even my lightest kits have a small ccf pad included; obviously what ever you can scavenge from Mother Nature will help as well :)
     
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  18. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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  19. snapper

    snapper Guide

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    For a typical 3 season outing my pack will always have the following items inside: 10'x12' syl nylon tarp w/ lines, rain/wind shell, fleece vest & beanie, headlamp, lighter & fire starters (lots of candle stubs), water tablets, space blanket and SOL one person bivy sack, first aid kit, knife, small hank of cord and some extra food (usually granola bars). So far I've never had to press it into service but I'm comfortable with it's usefulness should I need to.

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

    snapper
     
  20. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    The 2GoSystems Trifecta looks like a well made kit. I do not have any first hand experience with it though.

    I still think you would be better off with a SOL Escape Bivvy and a Poncho.
    For the amount of space the Trifecta takes up you could have a UL poncho and Escape Bivvy combo.
    The latter setup would have you better protected from the elements and have much more versatility with the same amount of space being occupied.
    Down side, it would cost about double.
     
  21. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ roughly the same weight as well and as noted more flexibility- worth a few bucks more imo

    I just got back my V2 Climashield quilt; I'll post up pics and specs over the weekend
     
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  22. jaffcat

    jaffcat Tracker

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    Trouble is the SOL escape bivvy is a bit on the snug size for most. Trifecta us bigger so I guess alot comes down to personal preference.

    Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk
     
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  23. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ true enough- I'm 5'11" 180 and I wouldn't want any smaller
     
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  24. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    my second quilt came out great, no thanks to me- just a really talented gal from work :)

    this quilt is 3.6 Apex (vs 2.5 for the first)- this should give me ballpark a 40 degree rating, it would be carried in colder conditions in conjunction with the bivy and additional clothing- more than likely an unplanned night out

    the construction is identical to the first, the weight is 16 oz on the nose- about 3.5 oz heavier than the first, but warmer

    the pic of it in the stuff sack, but could be compressed another ~ 30% if needed

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  25. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Yes Any heavier/warmer and you'll be adding in your down bag
     
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  26. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I love this thread. I need to learn to sew and get in on this DIY awesomeness. Mtwarden, that quilt looks great!
     
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  27. duckear

    duckear Tracker

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    I recently picked up a Klymit inflatable pad.
    I am amazed at how comfortable and how small they can pack up.
    Worth considering IMO if you are adding a pad to your every outing set up.
     
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  28. Exy

    Exy Bushmaster

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    Sleeping without fire has always interested me.

    I usually don't do more than an overnighter at a time, and my favorite trips are day trips.. I'm a bit scared to be honest..lol. Shit is remote out here, but with this cold weather I would really like to do a 3-5 day solo trip.

    Great info, escape bivy looks like the trick. I like medics idea of coupling it with a light weight sleeping bag.
     
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  29. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Turning my older winter day kit into my Hitch-hiking/Missed the bus kit
    I just found that if I fold my old 32mm Thermarest short in 5 it fits into the frame sleeve on my older pack and replaces the CCF and aluminium stays for the same weight and almost as much support. Surplus poncho and a poly groundsheet and because I always travel with suitable clothing if I need to spend a night rough I will be able to get some sleep.
    I'm now looking for a Hi-Vis hooded waistcoat so I can be seen from a distance
     
  30. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Now the forum has enough storage here are the pix.

    IMG_9591.JPG IMG_9592.JPG IMG_9593.JPG IMG_9594.JPG IMG_9595.JPG IMG_9596.JPG

    Grolsh bottle for scale. 96GSM sleeping bag and the Uber-lite half bag has 150 grams of 900 loft Hyperdry goose down, not enough insulation for above the snowline but OK down to freezing if I wear all my warm clothes and I always travel with my Uniqlo down parka and a spare set of warm underwear as our weather is so changeable
     

    Attached Files:

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  31. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Hey.. It's a FUTURE BOY!! HAHAHA!!! couldn't ignore the time... 1/1/2017!!! We are not quite there yet o'er here in the US ;) Happy New Year!
     
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  32. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ that looks like a system that would get you safely through an unexpected night out :)

    I think the entire point of this thread is that when traveling in remote country for the day there is always a chance of a forced night out; not being prepared for this scenario could possibly result in death (especially winter, but really any season). If you know you are going to be spending a night(s) out- your gear choices are going to be different; but a compact/lightweight sleep-shelter setup for a day out just makes good sense in my book
     
  33. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Totally agree, as this is also my summer kit for normal walking it does triple duty being my hunting kit as well until I can assemble a dedicated kit
    As all the pictures show none of these kits take up a lot of room, mine could be compressed into half its volume easily
    Next time those breathable SOL bivvys go to Massdrop I'll get one
     
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  34. Arrowolf

    Arrowolf Guide

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    I have a TNF Dolomite 40 degree bag, military Gore-Tex bivy and poncho liner, one silnylon and one lightweight polyethylene tarp in my daypack.
     
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  35. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    bump for summer is around the corner :)
     
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  36. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    How'd you go in the Bob??
    Still got all your fngers and toes I guess
     
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  37. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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  38. kyporter

    kyporter Supporter Supporter

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    I've been changing mine up recently.

    BCO poncho or mest tarp..... depending on what I feel like carrying (not pictured)
    Lightweight stake/line kit in a Phantom X xs pouch
    SOL X-large Emergency Bivy
    Orange Buff (to cover head, neck, face, etc)
    Gloves
    2 Contractor Bags
    Marmot Wind Jacket (no idea of the model name)..... it takes up no room and sheds rain fairly well too

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If I have to spend an unexpected night in the woods... something went wrong. I don't want to cut tent stakes and tie a lot of lines, quick and light is the way to go.

    [​IMG]

    I keep a mylar blanket in a possibles pouch/larger PSK with water purification, fire kit, and repair kit. That's why one isn't part of this kit. That pouch goes from pack to pack since buying multiples of certain items isn't really feasible.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
  39. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ looks good :)
     
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  40. kyporter

    kyporter Supporter Supporter

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  41. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    haven't seen one in person, but 6x8' would make a decent emergency shelter- the material sounds like it's thicker than your "normal" SOL blanket, so should be relatively durable (I'd throw in a length of gorilla tape just in case of a tear)- has stakes and guyout lines included-for $20 not too bad :)
     
  42. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    I think the main benefit of the kit is that; having bought it you are more likely to carry it; and may be thinking more about what else you need, like the extra chocolate bar, spare jacket/sweater and "don't forget the matches" sort of stuff
     
  43. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Nunatac have started doing bags, half bags and quilts with APEX as well as the garments mtwarden has informed us of.
    https://nunatakusa.com/23-quilts-and-jackets-with-synthetic-insulation

    Their cost for the Akula half bag is actually lower than my DIY cost and one of those in 5ounce batting would keep most people alive down quite low although I think the sweet spot for APEX is the 3.5ounce weight myself, if more warmth is needed go to down but as I've said before nearly all of us will carry a jacket or parka and at about a half kilo the elephants foot works well in this type of situation
     
  44. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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  45. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    I'd agree with his assesment on general priciples, and I agree with him that 2.5 isn't enough insulation and at that length a crutch strap is also a good idea on the jacket. Needs a hood tho for best sleeping warmth
    I definitely do not need a new half bag, at last count I had 5 or 6 of them, the older ones being kept for the grandkids.
    I am looking seriously at the new APEX overquilt tho, cheaper from Nunatack than the DIY option here.
     
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  46. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    definitely want a hood, not sure why he chose to go without?

    they talk about the half bag coming to waist height, I like mine to come to just about lower chest
     
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  47. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    I'd agree with that. My UL halfbag is 1300mm and I'd not want it any shorter, the Tamarack is 1500, the new BR is 1650 and a tad too long.
    All the old down bags I cut short are around 1500mm and this is also a good size for kids.
    How did the APEX hoody work for you? I need/want a new parka somewhere between the UL Uniqlo/Nanopuff and my heavy Everest downie/ Linebacker
     
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  48. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    excellently- really good bang for the weight (under 11 oz)- much more loft than I was expecting, nice and warm

    the Robic fabric is excellent as well- blocks wind well, but still breathes decently; much more water resistant than I was expecting too
     
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  49. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    PM incoming
     
  50. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Sounds reasonable to me, also sounds like extra insurance to help somebody out if need be; in that you could open it up to cover two people.
    it's also a good price point for something that may never get used. What will you sit on for ground insulation, your pack?
     
    rsnurkle and mtwarden like this.

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