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Sleeping Bag with Quilt Question

Discussion in 'Winter Camping' started by CharClothed, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

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    So I just got the Marmot Never Summer, I was curious though. If I got a 40 degree down quilt to go on top of the bag, would that up the temp rating of my 0 degree sleeping bag at all?
     
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  2. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter

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    What's the temperature rating on the sleeping bag?
     
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  3. gohammergo

    gohammergo Supporter Supporter

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    Yes.

    Everything you add helps. Except like a wet burlap sack. That wouldn't help! :)
     
  4. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

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    "would that up the temp rating of my 0 degree sleeping bag at all?"
     
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  5. central joe

    central joe Guide

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    Don't forget insulation from the ground to keep down conductive heat loss. joe
     
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  6. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    Did you ever get an underquilt? Piling on layers certainly will help, but insulating your backside (whether in a hang or on the ground) will warm you more efficiently, in my experience. To a certain point, anyway.

    I have a queen size down bed comforter I'm contemplating rigging as an underquilt.
     
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  7. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    40 quilt + 0 bag roughly in the neighborhood of 20 degrees, so -20 ish

    I've found that once you starting getting into the below 0 realm- lots of different factors come into play, not the least is your personal metabolism- everyone sleeps differently and it's more pronounced as the mercury drops
     
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  8. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

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    I use the chart found on the Enlightened Equipment site as a guide. it didn't format well but line up the bold temp lines like an X and Y axis and read the result at the intersection.

    for instance your question about a 0* bag, by using a 40* quilt over top, theoretically you could get to -30 but it's very important to take their advice that all of this is dependent on your own ability to stay warm while sleeping.

    Quilt Ratings 50ºF 40ºF 30ºF 20ºF 10ºF 0ºF
    50ºF 30ºF 20ºF 10ºF 0ºF -10ºF -20ºF
    40ºF 20ºF 10ºF 0ºF -10ºF -20ºF -30ºF
    30ºF 10ºF 0ºF -10ºF -20ºF -30ºF -40ºF
    20ºF 0ºF -10ºF -20ºF -30ºF -40ºF
    10ºF -10ºF -20ºF -30ºF -40F
    0ºF -20ºF -30ºF -40ºF


    read the whole article here --https://support.enlightenedequipment.com/hc/en-us/articles/115002770588-Layering-Sleep-Systems
     
  9. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

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    No I decided against it and went for a trusted brand. I am buying a under-quilt which I just plan on using as a regular quilt for the above purpose. Then I get the sleeping pad I'm eyeballing.
     
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  10. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

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    if the man has a 0* bag and is asking about adding warmth to that, I sure hope he's got his ground insulation figured out.

    but for what it's worth, insulation is additive. just as it's ok to layer top insulation, bottom pads or mats can be stacked to increase the rating. there is a discussion whether it's better to use foam under, or on top of, an air mattress but the most convincing support I've seen is for placing the closed cell foam (CCF) on top.

    I carry a short 24" wide piece of foam for a sit pad, etc/, and use it on top of my insulated air mattress when I need a boost. I've tried Reflectix but this should be used under an air mattress and it works better if it's full length...
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017 at 10:44 PM
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  11. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

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    Exped SynMat Mega 12 Sleeping Pad LXW with a R Value of 5.3
    https://www.backcountry.com/exped-s...mIEFjY2Vzc29yaWVzOjE6MzpiY3NDYXQ3MTAwMDAxMjQ=
     
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  12. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

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    there's a difference between cold, and "really cold"...

    sleep is important and this is one area I don't gamble. I use a bag rated for at least 10* colder than the lowest overnight low expected (not predicted). elevation, wind, humidity, it can always be colder than predicted. or I can be tired, dehydrated, etc., and that changes my resistance to cold. starting with a safety cushion and the ability to add insulation on top, makes this the easiest part of the equation.

    it's harder to make up for bottom insulation that isn't quite there and how you prepare your site and what you sleep on will have a lot to do with how warm you stay.

    I got my distaste for "really cold" camping as a young Boyscout doing Polar Bear camp-outs. we had a well-intentioned but inexperienced scoutmaster who would tell us to scrape all the snow away right down to the bare earth before we set our sleeping bag down. he even said to put some newspapers down if we were "afraid" of the cold. anyway...

    you "should" be ok with the Exped @ 5.3 R-value but again, every person and situation is different. the newer Thermarest mattresses get their light weight and warm rating by incorporating thermal reflectance technology. that's a fancy way of saying they use a reflector inside to bounce your Infrared heat energy back to you.

    obviously, it works but you can add this technology even if it isn't built inside your mattress but you need a minimum of 1/4" air space between you and the reflector.

    by using even an uninsulated "Space Blanket" under your mattress, you'll reflect some of your body heat back, but when it's "really cold", I use a 24x72 piece of Reflectix under my Exped Synmat9 and I haven't been cold sleeping on it yet (touch wood)...

    it's basically bubble wrap with a reflective coating and adds a bit of insulation as well as radiant barrier. it's light and fairly cheap but bulky but if you need it, you'll be so glad you have it...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017 at 9:27 AM
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  13. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    Way back in the 1900s, Id add either an old school nylon poncho liner, cheapo fleece blanket or Hudsons Bay blanket over my sleeping bag and get a noticeable boost in cold protection on my cheaper down bag. It didn't take much, none of the option above are very thick.

    A few times I put my down jacket over the foot end of my bag and got enough added warmth to get back to comfortable sleep. My canvas tarp also added some warmth if I pullet it over me. I mostly slept on the ground on the tarp if the weather wasn't bad.
     
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  14. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Bear in mind that the 0F Never Summer is at the limit of its rating at 0F and this is assuming you are wearing the socks/gloves/beanie and winter thermals it is tested using and that you are fully hydrated and have eaten properly/
    If all of these do not apply even using the quilt on top you may feel cool or cold at 0F.
    I tend to play Devils Advocate because I feel the cold and sleep cold
    But if all of the above apply and you are in a tent then yes you should get at least a 10 to 15 degree boost and possibly the full 20 degrees
    I just received my Nunatak overquilt and I got much less boost than I was hoping for YMMV
     

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