Sleeping Pad In A Budget

Discussion in 'Winter Camping' started by himesrun, Dec 25, 2016.

  1. himesrun

    himesrun Tracker

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  2. Backyard

    Backyard Supporter Supporter

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    Looks like store brand reflectix. Paired with a pad, will help. How much, undetermined. I would suggest ground cloth, this material (As many layers as you can carry), sleeping pad, sleeping bag. If you can get this material, your pad, and your bag inside a bivy without losing loft in your sleeping bag, you have a solid chance of staying on top of it all night.
     
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  3. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Personal experience tells me doubling up 2 or more cheap CCF pads will give much better value; 2 and a half pads with 3 layers under the torso.
    Tape them together at the camp or when packing. I went to wide pads for winter decades ago because I could not keep myself on top of the skinny ones
     
  4. Cheapeats

    Cheapeats Guide

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    I agree 2 cheapo pads work pretty good.
     
  5. mangkukhan

    mangkukhan Supporter Supporter

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    For a few dollars more you can get a new thermarest sleeping pad, but if you can't go over the listed item price I would look around marshals, tj maxx, and Ross for deals. This time of year all the sporting goods stores will have dumped merchandise from the previous season for the current season and newer models. Always deals to be had. I would also say sports authority for their sales but I think they closed shop so maybe dicks sporting goods. I've seen sleeping pads on sale there fairly often.
     
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  6. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

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    If weights not an issue the older style thermarest inflatables can be had pretty cheap, 30-40 bucks. Alps as well. But a couple foam mats are always a good investment.
     
  7. JackOfClubs

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    I spent probably 10 bucks (well technically I didn't, it was laying around the house, but it originally cost $10) on a thick, long yoga mat for my sleeping pad. Insulates exceptionally well, especially for price and original use. Bit on the burly side but it's nice and light-weight. It's enough for the semi-frozen, snow-free ground in Virginia. I am yet to use it in harsher conditions but it has held its own in our windy, cold barren wasteland of January. I'll try and get the name of the brand for you.
    +1 by the way on deals at sporting goods stores, sometimes it seems like they overprice the crap and pretty much give away the goods. Sometimes.

    "In the bleak midwinter.."
     
  8. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Guide

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    This:
    [​IMG]

    You can use spruce, fir, pine, most any evergreen will do but they need to be green. The thicker and more "fluffier" the boughs the better. Harvest branches responsibly by collecting from multiple trees. Lay them down in such a way that the needles and branches curve down so you don't get poked.

    Keep tucking in branches until your desired thickness. The thicker your pad, the warmer you will be so take the temperature into account when deciding how thick to make it.

    Pay particular attention to the torso and chest area of your pad and make that a bit thicker as that is where the majority of your bodyweight will be. Also make sure it's long enough, too short and you'll probably wake up to a muddy/dirty bottom portion of your sleeping bag.

    I don't own a sleeping pad, I sleep on boughs every trip. It's as budget friendly as it gets (free), doesn't weigh anything, is very comfortable, can be constructed in a matter of minutes, and is just as warm as a synthetic pad. Hard to beat waking up to the strong scent of spruce.
     
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