Small Hatchet made in Solingen Germany- Gift from my Uncle

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Kona9, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. Kona9

    Kona9 Supporter Supporter

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    05D40E2D-3562-441B-8E87-4E36BE01A133.jpeg 21FAD44A-D5BC-43B8-AD4A-2230CEDC7CF1.jpeg D3C943DC-36DE-4867-A96A-9B73DBD41DCD.jpeg 809C062C-FE93-4AFD-8E1E-001C3FFD12AF.jpeg 167BD88F-2195-4301-8667-F41EB632D137.jpeg 3E4E3E36-9A5A-465C-93DF-6AFE8210FE6F.jpeg I can’t remember if I ever posted this one. This hatchet was gifted to me by my uncle when I was about ten years old or so. I never really used it in the thirty or so years I’ve had it. He passed away about 15 years ago. This hatchet, an old Shimano fishing reel and an old monocular telescope (maybe spotting scope?) are all I have left from him. I would’ve had a fishing rod to go with the reel, but a family member accidentally snapped the rod before I received it.

    Anyway, back to this hatchet. It is branded Othello and stamped Solingen Germany in two places so I think it is safe to say that is where it was made. It’s a neat little thing. It weighs 12oz so most trees would not be too afraid of it. It’s never been sharp, but I did try to sharpen it one time when I was young and took a file to it. Its made of some sort of carbon steel as the hammer poll has some patina on it as well as a few rust spots here and there. The paint is a puke green with a hammered finish. The handle is sized for a grown man so I don’t think it was a kids toy. The stag scales, especially the side with the stamping, are the best part in my opinion. It always seemed a bit gimmicky to me with the bottle opener and screwdriver on top. It is something that I never plan on selling, but I also do not see myself ever using it either.

    My uncle was a true outdoorsman and would likely have been proud that I love the outdoors and share this passion with my kids. He was man’s man who was into knives and guns and hunted and drove a Jeep Grand Wagoneer with wood. He would likely have fit right in here with his wool hunting jacket and smoking a cigar. I believe he was forced to sell off all of his gear as he got older and his health got worse. I’m not even sure if his kids got any. I’m so glad that he gifted a few things to me, this hatchet being the the most unique. The mask has seen better days, but you can still make out where he wrote his name “Tony C” on the back in marker. I remember he marked all of his gear this way. I scratched my initials below back when I was young figuring that that was the cool thing to do. I just thought I’d share this little piece of my family history with you all.

    BTW- That is an Blind Horse Knives GNS next to the hatchet in one picture to give you a reference of how small this piece is.
     
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  2. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Scout

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    That is an interesting piece for sure. My fascination with anything edged leads me to believe this was designed as a game disassembly tool, more so than chopping wood. I've seen examples dating back to the 18th century. You would sure need to thin that bit to get it to do that. Family will do the strangest things sometimes. :)
     
  3. Coryphene

    Coryphene Guide

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    Interesting piece!

    I think that it was not "hammered finish" but left rough after casting as you can clearly see it was cast by the seam in the top.

    Puke green is best color for killing zombies. I bet this was meant to help you survive the zombie apocalypse. Cool that your uncle was thinking about you and decided you'd have a chance to survive such an event!
     
  4. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    The paint is hammertone paint, usually green like that, and I suppose you can still get it. Lots of machinery is painted with hammertone paint.
     
  5. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    A nice neat gift, and you have taken good care of it young fellar. joe
     
  6. Kelly W

    Kelly W Love the Axe Supporter

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    Very cool and very unique, I like the unique part best.
     
  7. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    Given the integral cap lifter, the designers clearly had their priorities in order.
     
  8. backlasher

    backlasher Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    A beautiful reminder of a special relative.
     
  9. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    Real stag grips is a nice feature. Never seen one, very unique multi-tool.
     
  10. A K Church

    A K Church Guide

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    "Othello" was a trademark of the Solingen firm Anton Wingen. Had a lovely old marlinspike sailor's folder by them, and what I call a buffalo pattern fixed blade hunter. Quality was good on both, but neither were in the class of, say, Puma.

    Vast majority of the Othellos I see are fixed blades.

    Othello is quite possibly the oddest choice for a trademark I can think of. He was a loyal intelligent black man tricked into murdering his white wife by a jealous underling. Great tragic play, but as a trademark?
     
  11. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter

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    We had similar tools at a place I worked. Not nearly as nice as yours with the beautiful handle. They were called “crate tools”.
    Yours looks like several levels up from the ones we had. Ours were just used to pry the lids off crates.
    That’s a tool that looks like it could be used in the field instead of the rough ones I remember.
    Thanks for showing it.
     
  12. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Very cool! I never seen a design like that!
     
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  13. A K Church

    A K Church Guide

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    BTW you will see the same distinctive and handsome angled guard and pommel "hook" on some of the Olsen knives from the 60-70s. I do not know if Wingen made Olsens, but it would not surprise me at all.
     
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  14. 45jack

    45jack Supporter Supporter

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    Looks to me like it was designed for opening crates, then enjoying a beverage when the work was finished.
     
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