SOLD- Hiking Buddy Knife

Discussion in 'Vendor-Hobbyist Classifieds' started by Bartonceek, May 16, 2018.

  1. Bartonceek

    Bartonceek Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    This knife is 6-5/8" OAL with a 3" blade, burlap micarta scales with nickel silver pins, micarta lanyard tube. Steel is 1084. I make most of my knives via stock removal - steel is normalized twice and then quenched followed by two 400 degree cycles in the oven. I have not made a sheath for this knife. I'm asking $105 for the knife which includes PP, shipping and insurance. I can make a leather sheath for the knife and the total will be $130 for PP, shipping and insurance. Thanks!
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    Last edited: May 16, 2018
    Rockgod1619, buckfynn, 08H3 and 20 others like this.
  2. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Hello,

    I have this problem. That being, I bought one of these knives. But I have two daughters that I'd like to share the outdoors with.

    So I guess I'll take it... :)

    PM incoming
     
  3. Vanitas

    Vanitas Supporter Supporter

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    Looks good!
     
  4. DrHuman

    DrHuman Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    I haven't seen the black burlap micarta on a piece yet, I gotta say it is really cool. That looks like a real handy little tool.
     
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  5. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Quick follow up on this knife and its evil twin... compliments of @Bartonceek

    My daughters are 12 and 15. I allowed the older girl to choose, and she chose the black burlap one from this sale thread. The younger girl gets the brown one.

    Work has been super busy and I haven't had much of a summer. The knives haven't gotten the miles on them I expected or hoped they would. But I did finally get outside for a spell.

    Over Labor Day, I was in northern California the great state of Jefferson for a few days of camping in Mad River. I could not bring the girls but I brought their knives. We had a fire pit and a charcoal grill but nonetheless I did some fire prep and made coffee on my new Scout stove, as an excuse to try out the knives (and the stove). I scrounged some very dry fir, a hunk of 180 proof fatwood, and a length of madrone for a baton.

    Mad River Wood Prep.JPG

    If you haven't heard of madrone, it is a hardwood that grows along most of the west coast; from San Diego to BC. It is so hard, in fact, that early Mexican vaqueros carved spurs out of madrone. It is a great cooking wood that imparts a flavor similar to mesquite. I was only making coffee so it would have been a waste to burn it up for that. I meant to bring a few logs back to Washington with me but I forgot to toss em in the truck. :mad:

    Anyway -- I went back and forth between the two knives; making shavings, carving stuff and batoning short pieces of fir. I have to say, even though the two knives look like exactly the same profile, they felt pretty much identical in the hand. Just enough grip length for my M/L hands, and perfect for my daughters' hands; now and at any age.

    I spent an hour or more carving feathers/shavings and whatnot from the tough old dry firewood I had collected. I wish I'd taken more pictures. Now, my own small knife (5col backpacker) has jimping on the spine, so I got into the habit of using my thumb on the spine to control the blade for some carving. I had to unlearn that habit. These knives have a nice, sharp 90 degree spine for ferro rods or fine shavings, but the tradeoff is the potential for blisters. Honestly I don't think it would be a problem with any sort of softer/greener wood. Or for folks who haven't learned the same knife habits as me. :14:

    The good news is that in this area (and especially this time of year) there is no shortage of dry tinder without needing to make shavings. I just wanted to see how the knives handled things, and as it turned out, they are fine tools for fire prep and general usage.

    I loaded up my stove and took a picture. See anything wrong?

    Mad River Stove Loaded.JPG

    It's worse than it looks. What you can't see very well in the above image is the triple handful of pine twigs shaken down into the fuel wood. I had too much wood in the stove for good airflow.

    Bah. Hindsight's 20/20, that's what them YouTube experts did, etc. But still.

    New stove, new thing to learn. After I took out a couple three pieces, added a few slivers of fatwood and hit it with a spark, the stove took off like gangbusters.

    So now I know better. And I'm impressed.

    Mad River Scout Stove.JPG

    In no time at all I was getting 2-3 foot flames. I put a pint of water on and when I checked it six minutes later it was a full, rolling boil. And when I was all done, the stove kept going for almost an hour. It left almost no ashes behind; everything burned completely. This thing is WAY more efficient and powerful than the "box" stoves I've tried before (I have a FireAnt and before that used a Vargo Hexagon -- stoves that work fine but trade efficiency for compactness).

    Made me some cowboy coffee from my brother's freshly roasted beans (mix of Burundi and Guatemalan). I forgot to let the water cool and pretty much RUINED the coffee. But it was still better than any coffee I paid for.

    But that's another story, as is the new stove. The star of THIS story is the two Hiking Buddy knives.

    They are great tools. My brother (USMC, Recon, survival instructor etc.) tried them out and now he wants one too.

    Each of my daughters gets their own individual tool (and matching sheath) but of equally high quality. Next up, I will sit down with my kiddos with some easy carving wood and do try sticks. No idea when, but it will happen. My girls need to work with their knives and make them their own.

    I really enjoyed using these knives, and am delighted that I can present them to my daughters.

    Thank you, @Bartonceek, for making these awesome knives.
     
  6. Bonekrakker

    Bonekrakker Not a chiropractor Supporter

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    Great write up.
     
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  7. Bartonceek

    Bartonceek Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    First off thank you for having the confidence to buy one of my blades
    Secondly thank you for putting them to use.
    Thirdly I’m proud that they served you well!

    I hope your daughters will get to share a lot of memories using the gifts from dad!
     
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