Spring Foraging... Post it up!!!!

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Gathering' started by IA Woodsman, Apr 20, 2016.

  1. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    I love foraging in the spring time. So many edibles, so little time.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Love the Ramps!!! (Wild Leeks). They are everywhere and easy to get.

    [​IMG]

    Trout Lilly is a little harder to dig, and does not yield as much. Still a starchy treat.

    [​IMG]

    The Basswood buds are very tasty right after they start to open. These opened right after a heavy rain. Each one had a big dose of rain water in it.

    [​IMG]

    Garlic Mustard is a very invasive species, but the young shoots have a mild garlic flavor.

    [​IMG]

    Wood Nettle is one of my favorites. Butter salt and pepper in a cast iron pan, think broccoli and asparagus.

    [​IMG]

    Curly Dock greens on the left and Jerusalem Artichoke on the left.

    More to come in the future. hopefully Morels!!!
     
  2. chris67

    chris67 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,306
    Likes Received:
    6,463
    Location:
    montana
    New I should of got a pic of the Siberian elm Samara. So delicious and so fast to gather. Sadly the season is really short.
     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  3. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    I had some of those the other day also. They were just starting to get a little tough, Still good though.
     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  4. Dadio

    Dadio Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,782
    Likes Received:
    3,784
    Location:
    Missouri
    Wood sorrel and spring beauty
    [​IMG]
     
    Hawaii, elkhound, Brook Trout and 2 others like this.
  5. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    Nice!!
     
    Wizange likes this.
  6. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    [​IMG]

    Stinging Nettle, not as good as Wood nettle, but makes a good tea.
     
    Wizange, Hawaii, elkhound and 4 others like this.
  7. the_dude

    the_dude Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2013
    Messages:
    4,571
    Likes Received:
    9,407
    Location:
    Berkshires Massachusetts
    not to hijack the thread, but what knife is that?

     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  8. chris67

    chris67 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,306
    Likes Received:
    6,463
    Location:
    montana
    they make a great salad its one of those foods that always impresses my friends that are new to wild plants
     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  9. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    bacpacjac likes this.
  10. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,315
    Likes Received:
    67,714
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Great selection IAWoodsman! If you really want to impress your friends, you can grab those nettle by the top, roll them up, give them a quick crush with your thumb to smash the needles, and pop them into your mouth. It's a little bit disconcerting the first time, but if you smash them good you won't get stung.

    [​IMG]

    On another note, I'm glad to see that sweet machete getting some use. I remember you post on re-handling it and it's been on my to-do list ever since.
     
    elkhound, Brook Trout and bacpacjac like this.
  11. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog In the Forest Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass III

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    3,189
    Likes Received:
    14,035
    Location:
    Budd Lake, New Jersey
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Dehydrated some stinging nettle but it actually dried just the same when left in a paper bag in my car.

    [​IMG]
    Violets

    [​IMG]
    Spring beauties

    Trout lily
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    So much to nibble on.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2016
    Wizange, Hawaii, elkhound and 3 others like this.
  12. Messnuk

    Messnuk Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    287
    Location:
    Il
    My first wild edible meal of the season was a bunch dandelion flowers dunked in a quick batter of flour and milk. One of my favorite things to make.
    image.jpg
     
    Wizange, Hawaii, kevseadog and 5 others like this.
  13. Twistokane

    Twistokane Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2015
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    173
    One thing i dislike is I am allergic to dandelions. One of the most prolific wild food sources around. And what you cooked up looks tasty!
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
    rsnurkle likes this.
  14. Messnuk

    Messnuk Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    287
    Location:
    Il
    Thanks! How did you find out you were allergic to dandelions ? I hope this isn't derailing the thread I'm just wondering because I didn't really think about allergies to wild edibles. I also don't have any allergies that I know of so I guess it's never really been on my mind.
     
    rsnurkle likes this.
  15. Panzer

    Panzer Prepared Wanderer Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Messages:
    10,988
    Likes Received:
    4,188
    Location:
    Ohio
    wood sorel and day lily are favs in our house.
     
  16. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Messages:
    12,822
    Likes Received:
    46,468
    Location:
    TN
    Love it guys, thanks for posting these, I've got so much to learn about wild edibles!
     
  17. Blackhawk45hunter

    Blackhawk45hunter Pronounced sim-bee-duh Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 24, 2011
    Messages:
    4,233
    Likes Received:
    4,568
    Location:
    Nelsonville, Ohio
    Cut-leaf Toothwort. One of my favorite greens for adding to salads!
    Peppery, spicy and a little like horseradish. The roots can actually be used as a horseradish substitute.

    [​IMG]

    With all the greens coming up now I finally get a chance to start using my new Badgerclaw folding dump pouch. Good piece of kit for this kind of thing.
    I'm hoping to get out to my favorite wood nettle patch this weekend. :dblthumb:
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
    Wizange, elkhound, rsnurkle and 2 others like this.
  18. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    12,071
    Likes Received:
    23,629
    Location:
    Northern In. On the river
    Those Springbeauty are really prolific . Is it just ours that have the really tiny little bulbs about the same size of a Pea . Troutlilly are tedious too but worth it I think.
    Solomon seal is one of my favorite vegetables, but I have not found any yet .
     
    Wizange likes this.
  19. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog In the Forest Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass III

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    3,189
    Likes Received:
    14,035
    Location:
    Budd Lake, New Jersey
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    2nd lunch. I wonder how the calories add up. I should try to go a day on just spring greens and find out.

    Redbud flowers, spring beauty, trout lily, violet, dandelion, stinging nettle, garlic mustard

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
  20. chris67

    chris67 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,306
    Likes Received:
    6,463
    Location:
    montana
    curly dock

    storks bill

    mustard

    mallow

    fire roasted stinging nettle

    salad made from all this wild goodness

    dandelion fritters
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
  21. .356luger

    .356luger Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2013
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    781
    Location:
    Central indiana
    WP_20160421_13_16_59_Pro.jpg
    ]I havent found a thing spring is stupid.
     
  22. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,315
    Likes Received:
    67,714
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    I coincidentally saw a couple of these today which look somewhat similar. Are they morels?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  23. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    12,071
    Likes Received:
    23,629
    Location:
    Northern In. On the river
    The only way to tell for sure is for you to dehydrate them put them in a small box and ship them to RiverJoe . I will reconstitute them and consume them. I'll let you know if I get sick.
     
  24. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    12,071
    Likes Received:
    23,629
    Location:
    Northern In. On the river
    I like to combine wild edibles with tame edibles . Here is my red green soup. It is only about 130 cal per cup.

    I sauté 10 ounces of chicken breast with 2 cups Of fresh ramps in about 1 teaspoon of olive oil in a large pot. Meanwhile I simmer one cup frozen brussels sprouts one cup spinach , and one cup of cut up red pepper in 6 cups of chicken broth. I like to throw in a can of pinto beans and then combine the chicken ramps etc. all in the large pot.

    I will substitute poke salad or milkweed later in the spring for spinach .

    So far I've lost about 18 pounds since March 17. I will have 2 cups of this soup for supper or one cup and two fish fillets Still only 330 with the fish or 260 for the two cup soup .

    [​IMG]
     
  25. Twistokane

    Twistokane Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2015
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    173
    When i was about three i was running thru the giant ones that stand about 2 and a half feet tall i fell over my throat closed up. Had to have an emergency tracheotomy and shots for years after that. I actually may have outgrown it by now being almost 44 but i do not mess with them.
     
    bacpacjac and rsnurkle like this.
  26. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    Finally started finding some Morels.

    [​IMG]
     
  27. Primitive Woods Dweller

    Primitive Woods Dweller Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2016
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Eastern woodlands
    I can't get enough wood sorrel[​IMG]
     
  28. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    Made a small batch of Wood Nettles with a ramp for seasoning.

    [​IMG]

    Love these things. I need to learn how to can them.
     
  29. Woods Walker

    Woods Walker Rattlesnake Charmer. Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2011
    Messages:
    10,753
    Likes Received:
    16,984
    Location:
    Konnecticut
    Ok. I was doing a review on one of my favorite gear items....No it's not a knife rather an Equinox Poncho...LOL! So anyways was thinking about this thread.

    Hiking.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I ate the flower but the leaves are also good. Keep away from the roots. Violet.

    [​IMG]

    Oddly enough this is actually a winter wild edible but still about in Spring. Partridgeberry.

    [​IMG]

    Waited out a bit of rain.

    [​IMG]

    Remember don't eat anything unless you're 100% certain of the ID. In short don't do stupid stuff.
     
  30. Dadio

    Dadio Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,782
    Likes Received:
    3,784
    Location:
    Missouri
    this is the bulb aka "corm" of the spring beauty. These had a bit of taste like the core of a cabbage, if that makes any sense.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2016
  31. Mazer

    Mazer Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Messages:
    596
    Likes Received:
    458
    IMG_2187.jpg , IMG_6879.jpg , IMG_8096.jpg , IMG_0042.jpg , IMG_8096.jpg Sorry these are sideways - Acorns, Wild Strawberries, Wild Radish flowers, Stinging Nettle, Mustard - here in Northern California we have a ton of wild edibles.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2016
  32. jcl-MD

    jcl-MD The Enigma Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2010
    Messages:
    4,432
    Likes Received:
    660
  33. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh Dirt Merchant Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,238
    Likes Received:
    7,224
    Location:
    Ohio
    My breath was soo bad, but it tasted so good!
    13006723_1321055231243369_4074425181111949439_n.jpg
     
  34. Panzer

    Panzer Prepared Wanderer Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Messages:
    10,988
    Likes Received:
    4,188
    Location:
    Ohio
    I got out yesterday and found a nice patch. Need to go back with a spade.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Short video of the harvesting action!
    [video=youtube;AeecU4Zq5gk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeecU4Zq5gk[/video]
     
  35. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Lifetime Supporter Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10,535
    Likes Received:
    16,811
    Location:
    South West IA
    [​IMG]

    Dryads Saddle, also called Pheasant Back.
     
  36. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,315
    Likes Received:
    67,714
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    I had no idea that there were edible fungi that big! That's a real score.
     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  37. ISK

    ISK Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    SF CA
    Ginger

    [​IMG]

    Pine Pollen Cones

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2016
  38. nickortizzle

    nickortizzle Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    83
    Location:
    Central MA
    you should see the size of the chicken of the woods I find in my area every summer. some get upwards of 10lbs and larger than a basketball
     
  39. chris67

    chris67 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,306
    Likes Received:
    6,463
    Location:
    montana
    Rose petals, desert paint brush flowers, black locust flowers, mint, cattail stinging nettle
     

    Attached Files:

  40. chris67

    chris67 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,306
    Likes Received:
    6,463
    Location:
    montana
    I cut up the cattail in rounds and sauteed it in olive oil. After it cooked a bit I added the stinging nettle, mustard, mint and sauteed it all together. I pulled it off the heat and added the black locust flowers and a little salt. To go with it I had mint tea.
     

    Attached Files:

  41. bumma

    bumma I'm not lost. Just a bit confused. Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2014
    Messages:
    2,377
    Likes Received:
    8,694
    Location:
    Maine!
    I was out turkey hunting yesterday and found some fiddleheads ?

    My question for those in the know. In the photo the fuzzy ones on the right are not good but are the smaller ones on the left the good ones? They sure look right and everything I have read points to them being the edible type but I thought I would ask here before harvesting any.

    Sorry for the poor photo. I used my phone.
    fiddleheads.jpg

    Thanks!
     
  42. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,315
    Likes Received:
    67,714
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    I love this thread, but so many of our wild edibles aren't ready to eat this early. I figured one way that I might be helpful for some of the PNW guys to see a few of my favorites as they look right now. This way you can try to spot them in your area and come back to them when they're nice and ripe.

    I'll try to post them in roughly the order that they will be available. Keep in mind that the Pacific Northwest is a big place with lots of different regions, so different climates, elevations, and other factors will see these bear fruit at different times. I put the approximate month for harvest for my local area next to the scientific name, but check yours ahead of time to make sure you don't miss them. Fruits like Indian Plum are only on the bush for a week or two before the birds get them all.

    If this thread continues into summer or we get a summer edibles thread, I'll update with photos of the plants as their ready for harvest.
    These aren't guidebook quality photos, just shots that I picked out of my photos taken this month. Plants are known by so many different regional names so I have included their scientific names to help avoid confusion.

    Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (March/April)

    These come up early but they are getting big already and the leaves aren't nearly as tender anymore. My favorite way to eat these is to wilt them with a little bit of butter in a pan like spinach. As mentioned in a previous post, they can also be rolled up and crushed to render them harmless for eating raw.

    [​IMG]

    Indian Plums or Osoberries Oemleria cerasiformis (May)

    The first fruits to be ripe in our area. These berries will turn a dark purple and are delicious. They taste and smell surprisingly similar to cucumber which is a good way to identify them if you're not sure. For some reason, I can only eat a handful or so at a time before they lose their appeal, so you probably won't be eating them by the bucket.

    [​IMG]

    Salmonberry Rubus spectabilis (May/June)

    These berries will be either red or orange. Some people say that one or the other tastes better but I haven't found this to be the case. Some of them are delicious and others are kind of gross. It has to do with the genetic stock and soil conditions, so if you have tried them and don't like them, give them another chance by trying berries from different bushes until you find some sweet ones.

    [​IMG]

    Wild Strawberry Fragaria virginiana & Fragaria vesca (June/July/August/September)

    The berries are much smaller than what you see in the grocery store, but what they lack in size, they make up for in sweetness. Different plants seem to ripen at different times, so these are available throughout the summer in my region.

    [​IMG]

    Thimbleberry Rubus parviflorus (July/August)

    These will be nice red berries that look almost identical to raspberries. They are a lot softer so they're best eaten off the bush instead of collected in a bucket or basket. They are pretty seedy so to avoid getting the tiny seeds stuck in my teeth, I just mash them against the roof of my mouth with my tongue and swallow.

    [​IMG]

    Black Cap Rubus occidentalis (July/August)

    These are my favorite wild berry by far. They come off of the plant hollow like a raspberry and are often called black raspberries for the similarities. When they are red, they look just like raspberries but they are not ripe and delicious until they turn a deep purplish black.

    [​IMG]

    Red Huckleberry Vaccinium parvifolium (July/August)

    These bushes are everywhere and you'll see them on top of a lot of stumps and downed timber. They will be little tart red berries that look like salmon eggs.

    [​IMG]

    Salal Gaultheria shallon (August)

    This is the dominant ground cover plant in a lot of areas. In the deep forest it's often knee or waist high, but in clearings and on the coast it can grow taller than a man. I grew up thinking these were poisonous due to my Dad being told the same thing as a boy. They were actually the most important berry to many local tribes and despite being seedy are actually pretty good.

    [​IMG]

    Trailing Blackberry Rubus ursinus (August/Sept)

    Another berry that is smaller than its grocery store and invasive counterparts. These little berries will be found all over the forest floor if you just follow the vines.

    [​IMG]

    Oregon Grape Mahonia aquifolium (August/Sept)

    This is another one that I grew up thinking was poisonous due to getting bad information. They are very tart, but definitely edible.

    [​IMG]

    This is by no means an exhaustive list of wild edibles for the area, just what I had photos of from this month to share. Another awesome resource is the wild blueberry thickets in the mountains, but they're still covered in snow, so no photos of those yet. We also have several species of huckleberry and lots of other fruiting plants not pictured here. If these plants ripen in your area at a different time, please feel free to mention it so that other members can be on the lookout.

    I'm not currently comfortable enough identifying fungi to eat them but I have seen what I believe to be morels and chanterelles in the woods. Also, I suspect that there are probably greens that may be ripe right now but I'm not far enough down the path of knowledge to point them out to you.

    I am not an expert so please be sure to properly identify any plants before consuming them.
     
    Hawaii, merlinfire, elkhound and 5 others like this.
  43. .356luger

    .356luger Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2013
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    781
    Location:
    Central indiana
    I canned a bunch of wild onions with apple cider vinegar and salt to taste and some asparagus for bloody marrys. I wound up eating a jar before I ever made a bloody marry. I sautéed mushrooms and those pickled onions in butter with a tbls of sugar and a pinch of salt and topped a steak with it... Had my self a mouthgasm

    Best way I have found to harvest alot is to dig a whole shovel full. Knock most of the dit off and get 3-4 big dirt filled bundles and put them in a bucket and hit them with the hose. Dump the dirt and water and repeat until they are all clean.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
    rsnurkle, Brook Trout and bacpacjac like this.
  44. Messnuk

    Messnuk Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    287
    Location:
    Il
    Found my first ever wild onions today! Was doing some clearing work and kept smelling chives/onion. Eventually I tracked down the smell to wild onions. After I had identified the plant I realized how many were around me.
    image.jpg
     
    Wizange, merlinfire, elkhound and 5 others like this.
  45. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog In the Forest Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass III

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    3,189
    Likes Received:
    14,035
    Location:
    Budd Lake, New Jersey
    This is great. love seeing these from around the country.

    Got out Monday and had some success with tenkara. Released the brookies and brown but took this stockie rainbow.. Surrounded by leeks and some trout lily. That stockie was too ugly to put back in the beautiful river. It''ll look better when covered with bacon.
    20160425_174541.jpg

    Also checked on the wood nettle after IA Woodsman said it was coming up. It did at the edge of an open field but not down near the cool creek.
    20160425_182306.jpg

    And my little Lenape/Native American garden looks awesome if I don't say so myself. Just happy to see how well some of the plants are growing and spreading.
    Lenape Garden.jpg
    I've just over time added a whole mix of wild edibles and useful plants in there and it is filling in nicely. Now the supermarket, pharmacy and hardware store is just a crawl out the door if necessary.

    Includes Ostrich Fern, Leeks, Mountain Mint, Elderberry, Joe Pye Weed, Common Milkweed, Stinging Nettle, Onion Grass, arrowwood viburnum and lots of jewelweed and some pokeweed in between.


    when you eat nettle do you all pull the leaves off? eat the whole tender top? Or just chop anything remotely tender?
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
  46. chris67

    chris67 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,306
    Likes Received:
    6,463
    Location:
    montana
    I find the older parts of stinging nettle tend to be fibrous to enjoy. I eat the whole tender top and then pull off the leaves from the rest of the plant.
     
    rsnurkle and bacpacjac like this.
  47. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,315
    Likes Received:
    67,714
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    That's helpful info. At the start of spring all of the leaves are nice and tender. However, this time of year I write them off as being too stringy and tough. It makes sense that even though it's later in the year, there would be new growth at the top that should be more tender. Thanks Chris, I'm going to go eat some more nettles!
     
    rsnurkle and bacpacjac like this.
  48. chopchop

    chopchop Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    281
    Location:
    east coast of Kansas
    My yard is full of dandelions, some kind of onion, and a couple feral cilantro patches. It turns out I should've been making soup instead of just mowing all this time! :)
     
    big belly jon, rsnurkle and bacpacjac like this.
  49. Sealbilly

    Sealbilly Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2013
    Messages:
    1,074
    Likes Received:
    753
    Location:
    EasTn
    I found these today to bad it's not the right time of year. uploadfromtaptalk1462075696554.jpg

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
     
    elkhound, Brook Trout and bacpacjac like this.
  50. Poeschel

    Poeschel Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2014
    Messages:
    544
    Likes Received:
    2,295
    After reading through this thread, I realize I'm missing out on A LOT of good eats. I've been working hard the last couple years on mushroom IDing that I've forgotten about the greens. Good stuff guys, I'm jealous.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    bacpacjac, merlinfire and rsnurkle like this.

Share This Page