Spring Foraging... Post it up!!!!

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Gathering' started by IA Woodsman, Apr 20, 2016.

  1. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Coltsfoot is popping up now. This is one of those plant names that gets applied to a lot of different species depending on region, so for specificity, this is Petasites frigidus. I have been aware of this plant for a long time, but didn't realize it was edible until it was too late last year.

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    According to my books, the stems are good cooked, and the leaves can be eaten raw or cooked like spinach. Being the first time I've consumed this plant, I just chewed up a couple of small leaves to make sure I didn't have a reaction to it.

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    It's been a few hours and no issues yet, so I'll be experimenting with this one this season.
     
  2. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I saw these little horsetail sprouts coming up along the waters edge.

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    I remembered from one of my edible plants books that you can eat these when they are young, but I couldn't remember the specifics. I took a little nibble and it didn't have much flavor, but it was tender, so I gathered up a little pile with the intent of throwing them into a salad with dinner.

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    I didn't have the book with me in the woods, but checked it when I got home and apparently these are best harvested when they are a little bit bigger, as they have a tougher outer layer that is supposed to be peeled. The ones I gathered were just too small to peel, so I'll have to try again. It also says that they are better cooked than raw and may be toxic in large quantities, so this isn't something that you want to eat a lot of.

    I also spotted what I believe to be some sort of dock. I've always called this Sour Dock (Rumex crispus?), but I'm not positive on the ID, so I haven't tried eating it yet. It looks different from a lot of the photos I see online. Are any of you able to confidently ID this one?

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    From what I have read, sour dock is very high in oxalic acid and should be cooked before eating to break some of that down.
     
  3. Badey

    Badey Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    @NWPrimate that last photo looks like Bitter Dock (Rumex obtusifolius).

    Sam Thayer seems to indicate that all Rumex are edible (although some are less tasty than others) - his book Nature's Garden has a nice section on Rumex (which is where I referenced to take a semi-educated stab at the "dock" in your picture).
     
  4. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks @Badey ... you might be right. Bitter dock doesn't sound all that appealing, but who knows. :)
     
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  5. Turtle Creek

    Turtle Creek Scout

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    only 1 morel .....
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    It's like ordering one little chicken wing. Hopefully more to come soon.
     
  6. chris67

    chris67 Supporter Supporter

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    Wild asparagus

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    Wild hyacinth

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    Hedge hog cactus

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    Miners lettuce

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    Chickweed

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    Christmas cholla

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    Manzanita flowers steeped in cold water for 24 hours makes nice sweet drink

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  7. chris67

    chris67 Supporter Supporter

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    Prickly pear

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    Wild rhubarb


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  8. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Guide

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    @chris67 nice work! Looks like plenty to forage in your neck of the woods. I was eating some manzanita flowers a couple days ago, the ones here just started to form and are a tad bit smaller but man are they tasty!

    @NWPrimate how were the horsetail shoots? Did you cook them or eat them raw? I have been wanting to try them but the silica content makes me wonder. I would imagine the younger ones would be much more tender and with less silica.

    The larger more mature plants have a lot of silica in them which will grind your teeth down if eaten enough over a period of time. I actually rub the adult shoots on bone to sharpen and grind tools with.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  9. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    The one I tasted was nice and tender without any noticeable grittiness. I didn't end up eating the rest of them after realizing there was no easy way to peel them due to their size. There were lots of larger ones that would be more ideal that I passed up in favor of those little tiny ones though, so I'll try again soon. I'll mention again that these are not something you would want to eat a lot of, as in addition to the silica they have other compounds that can be harmful in large doses.
     
  10. Badey

    Badey Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I decided to take a few minutes to put the skills I learned yesterday into practice today.

    I ate a Common Blue Violet (it was the only one I could find on my property).

    image.jpeg

    I found some Garlic Mustard and ate a stalk. It was way less bitter than the leaves, but it was a little stringy.

    image.jpeg image.jpeg

    I found some kind of mint sprout (not sure what species yet, but it has a square stem, and smells strongly of mint when the leaves are crushed, so it is definitely a mint).

    I'm going to wait until I can ID the species of this mint before I use it, but I'll be keeping my eye on it.

    image.jpeg
     
  11. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass Instructor

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    Picked some very tender Wood Nettles the other day. Sauteed them up with Garlic Mustard stems, a few Ramps, and butter.

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  12. City Bushcrafter

    City Bushcrafter BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    Some city foraging...Surinam cherries. The trees are used as hedges around my neighborhood. Neighbors look at me weird when I pick and eat them.

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  13. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass Instructor

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    Pheasant Back mushrooms are out in force.

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  14. dmangler

    dmangler Tracker

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    Found last night at my super secret fishing spot. Same spot ever year without fail.
     

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  15. chris67

    chris67 Supporter Supporter

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    Siberian elm samara with wild asparagus, dandelion fritters, pickled green beans, and eggs from my buddies chickens

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  16. Forestree

    Forestree Scout Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Huckleberries are starting to ripen up

    [​IMG]Huckleberries by Tom Roo, on Flickr

    And dewberries

    [​IMG]Dewberries by Tom Roo, on Flickr

    Stopped by and dug some garlic at my secret spot where an old homestead used to be

    [​IMG]Garlic by Tom Roo, on Flickr

    Several different types on interesting plants here right off the road under the shade of some big old live oaks. There is a blanket of violet wood sorrel here. This picture is as close as I'll get to disclosing any information on this spot, haha :D

    [​IMG]Untitled by Tom Roo, on Flickr
     
  17. Forestree

    Forestree Scout Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Well funny enough that I just posted up in here and went on an evening walk to find the first chanterelles of the year! Picked some babies to have for a snack tonight....oh how I've missed you tasty mushrooms :D

    [​IMG]Chanterelles by Tom Roo, on Flickr
     
  18. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I did a little foraging while I was out playing this afternoon.

    Earlier in this thread, I posted about these little salmonberry shoots, but they were just barely popping up then. At that point, you have the eat the leaves if you want to get anything out of them, but they're really coming along now.

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    Once they get to this size, you can actually start eating the shoots which are much better. You can see they're starting to grow little tiny thorns.

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    You can peel those off with the outer layer, and the inside is crisp and tender.

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    There are nettles everywhere and they are getting tall fast. There were enough of them that I was able to be picky and just take the new tops.

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    I cooked them up in some butter until they were just past wilted like you would if you were using spinach.

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    They came out really good! :)

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    I also gathered some new wild strawberry leaves for tea.

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    It was kind of bland, so I may try crushing them up first next time.

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  19. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Morels finally coming around here but as usual I'm having a hard time spotting them Neighbor found eight up at the summer place .
    Since I'm just not good at spotting them I have gone to lots of other species thru the years .
    I've spotted these dryad saddles thru the years but never got around to eating one . Here's some I found tonight down by the river .

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  20. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I was really hungry for mushrooms but I'd heard the Dryads weren't too great ,especially the big ones .
    Au contraire Pierre .

    I was going to cover them in an egg wash and then roll them in bread crumbs . Got back up to the house and found all our eggs had been hard boiled and colored for Easter . Ok tho cause we didn't have any bread crumbs .anyway .
    So I found some Avacodo oil (I really don't care for Olive oil) and some Montreal Steak spice . Fry them in the oil used lots of Montreal spice plus some Mrs Dashes to counteract all the sodium.
    Thing I really liked was the texture , chewy but not tough . I really felt I was eating a nice piece of meat .
    This would be a nice meat substitute for our Spring forager when hardly anything is in season . I feel that although these were some large specimens they were quite fresh .

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  21. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Most of you are probably familiar with this stuff. I always called it bedstraw but some people call it goose grass. It has velcro quality to it and a lot of the times it will be stuck to the dog and my pant legs. I was surprised to read that this stuff is edible.

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    Because the stems are designed to break off when they grab onto a passing animal, this has to be one of the easiest plant to gather. Just a little pressure and they come right up.

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    Getting those little velcro hairs stuck in your throat doesn't sound pleasant, but apparently boiling them for a few minutes takes care of this.

    I'm going to try a few with dinner tonight and see how it goes. The book has a warning about coumarin sensitive individuals getting headaches from this plant and advises starting with a small amount to begin with. That seems like solid advice for trying any new plant.
     
  22. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Stuff is pretty common around here too (check out the photo above with it growing along side the Drysds saddle .
    Always wondered what it tasted like .

    Be sure and report your impressions please . I think it's also called cleavers .
     
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  23. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    To play it safe, I only ate two of them and they were pretty bland, but not bad. There was no sign of the velcro after boiling them.
     
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  24. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass Instructor

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    We had some the other night. I usually only eat the small ones or the soft edges of the larger ones. I might try the beefier parts of the large ones in the future after your experience.
     
  25. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass Instructor

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    No velcro is good.
     
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  26. chris67

    chris67 Supporter Supporter

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    I talked to Karen Sherwood about cleavers and she said it was fine to eat the raw tops and we did with no problem. My guess is that the older plants get stiffer barbs and that is where the Velcro warning came from. There weren't older plants around to check.
     
  27. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Well on night one I ate the smaller and more tender ones . Last night I fixxed up the second string bunch and some were so tough we couldnt eat them . Im afraid I turned off my little buddy on them cause hes not really into spicy either .
    The bigger ones had a slightly woody taste that wasnt all that unpleasant but the first ones were definitely better .

    edit the pan in the frying photo is a big pan { 12 inch } so IMHO thats about the max size Id go with .
     
  28. Badey

    Badey Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    The wood sorrel is coming up around here now. Lots of lemon my goodness (although not as good as sheep sorrel, in my opinion).

    image.jpeg
     
  29. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I guess no one actually answered your question . I don't believe your specimens to be false Morels because they have pits instead of being convoluted . As someone else said slice them lengthwise and note if hollow or not . Bugs like to hide in the hollow areas of Morels anyway so it's time well spent .
    I try and think of some hook to remember poison stuff . Evil brain for convoluted False Morels.
    Christmas teee leaf for
    Poison Hemlock . Lilly of the Vally leaf for Ramps . This reminds me not to eat poisonous Lilly of the Valley thinking it Ramps . I know not and easy mistake but I'd bet it has happened .
     
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  30. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks @riverjoe ... just to make sure I understand you, do you think that was an edible morel? If they are hollow, does that make them morels or false morels? Don't worry too much about the ramifications if you can't tell for sure, or if there is some ambiguity to the rules. I won't take any of it as gospel. I'm still a long ways from being confident enough to actually eat mushrooms in the woods; but I am interested in learning.
     
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  31. Badey

    Badey Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Congrats on finding some yummy, tasty, scrumptious morels!
     
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  32. Turtle Creek

    Turtle Creek Scout

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    Yes, I'm pretty sure what you have there is a true morel. I slice mine length wise and they completely hollow. (unless you cut/pinch it off at the soil line.)

    See the difference from a Google Image:
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  33. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Yes I think that is a Morel . I would slice it in half tho to be sure it has no Cottony fiber inside like a false Morel .
    Also when you slice it you can check to be sure that the cone is attached to the stem clear down to the bottom .
    I thought I remembered reading somewhere that false Morels were generally later in the summer too but
    That's pretty ambiguous .
    When you get into it you'll find that you'll run across dozens of Funghi that don't seem to be in any book . That's ok just concentrate on the ones with the outlandish hooks like Shaggy Mane ,Chicken of the. woods , Hen of the Woods ,Clavicorona etc .
    Stay away from the pretty mushrooms like Destroying Angel and the Amanita .
    There is a big huge book called Mushrooms Demystifyed that is difficult to wade thru for me but it has tons of info . I'm not as cray about it as I could be because the author is more interested in the western US .
     
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