Summer temperature warning!

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Mikewood, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. Mikewood

    Mikewood Guide

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    Safety warning.

    During the summer office and commercial building temperatures can dip into the high 60’s.

    Please take breaks as needed in your toasty 120 degree car to warm up.
     
  2. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I just consider it practice for a fall cold snap. joe
     
  3. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter

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    It's funny how quickly your body acclimates to temps.

    I have been working inside a sunporch remodeling it. Even with windows open the interior temp, especially near the ceiling, is probably 20-30* warmer than outside.

    After spending as little as a half hour or so in the porch, when I step out to get something, I get chilled. Even if it's 70* outside.
     
  4. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    I'd rather be too hot than too cold...my wife disagrees :4:. When she's running the AC in the summer I usually have to go outside and warm up every hour or so. I'd rather stay adjusted to the real (scorching hot :cool:) conditions outside, than get too used to artificial cool.
     
  5. actiondiver

    actiondiver Tracker

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    A local 17 year old boy died due to heat stroke on his first day on the job working landscaping.

    I’ve added instant ice packs to the medical kit along with gator aid mix.
     
  6. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    I can deal with the heat much better then cold. I hibernate during winter months.
     
  7. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    One of my first jobs was working for an electrician--believe it or not, his name was Wyers. I was only 14 or 15, but that was a different era. My job was to crawl around in the attic and drop cable or do whatever was needed up top to get electricity to a plug or whatever.

    Anyway, we are talking Texas in July or August and it was at least 98° outside. The attic felt like an oven when I stuck my head in. After about 10 to 15 minutes I had sweated enough that my jeans were dripping wet, literally, but I felt pretty comfortable. He would only let me stay in the attic about 20 minutes. I'd come down to that 98° heat and feel chilled. Humans can handle heat better than most any wild animal, or at least we could before we got used to AC. Large mammals tend to sweat to keep cool while smaller ones pant. Since we are among the smaller sweat animals, we can adapt quite well to heat.

    Runners in hot climates are advised to leave their dogs at home when running because their loyal pets will overdo it and can suffer life threatening overheating. Birds as well as mammals cool by evaporation, it's just that we cool by evaporation both as we breathe and as we sweat.

    Folks who live in very humid environments such as the Gulf Coast like to talk about days when it is 90° and 90% humidity. Not really true. Most days it will cool to near the dew point overnight, so the humidity is 90% early morning. As the day warms the air's capacity to hold moisture climbs and so the relative humidity drops. My experience is that 40% humidity is stifling when the temperature gets on up there.

    A good breeze can compensate for that higher humidity, though. I find that many times when I think it is really humid what I really am sensing is the lack of air movement. Most of my family lives further west in Texas or even New Mexico. They benefit from both low humidities and air movement. Oh, yes, and elevation which also increases evaporation rate. A 100° day on the South Plains can be quite bearable. Now, if they only had shade…
     
  8. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    One of the things I pondered on when we studied geography in school was the explanation for native dress. People in tropical areas wear minimal clothing so they can keep cool. Folks in desert climates wear relatively heavy clothing to protect them from the heat. That always seemed contradictory.

    Years of experience in a hot climate have led me to a better understanding. In tropical climates you need all the skin exposure you can get because of the high humidity. In desert climates, once the hot air has evaporated all your sweat, all additional air can do is transport in additional heat load. You can probably sweat even more, but that wastes valuable water, again, think desert environment. So, the heavier clothing makes good sense after all.

    Thinking back to before air conditioning, I'd sit in a chair in front of an oscillating fan and read during the hottest part of the day. Sometimes I would pull up the knob to stop the fan from going back and forth. I could never understand why I often felt more comfortable with the fan oscillating than with me hogging all the air, blowing right on me. I'd guess it was that same factor--once the moving air had evaporated my sweat, all the additional air would do was blow hot air onto me!
     
  9. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    I'm in the "rather be hot" camp myself.. though "feels like 98" isn't exactly good speed walking weather....
    :40::40:
     
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  10. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I am a polar bear ,of sorts . I prefer the cold any day for as long as it lasts .
    One of the many reasons I believe the I'd be much more at home in Alaska than any where else .
    I can deal with darkness and working out in the cold ,it was my life working at the ski slopes making snow and working on the snow cats in the mountains and I loved it .
    But heat is the killer ,it drains my inspiration and perspiration and there's not much you can do when it's 100+ degrees .
    When it gets cold enough the air dries out and it's not so bad , but there is no amount off heat the dries out the air enough to call it bearable .
    On the bike in cold weather you have the hope and expectation of going home and warming up, but in the heat, unless you've got air conditioning going, your coming home to an oven.
     
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  11. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    Few of God’s creatures are better adapted to heat than are we. Most animals that cool by perspiration are larger than us. Over long distances, humans are the speed champs. Ancient civilizations flourished in hot climates.

    That said, all my life I’ve pondered the difficulty of life without electrical power, specifically without refrigeration. I understand folks as far south as Kansas would cut ice and store it for summer use in cellars insulated by hay.

    We are capable of being much tougher than we are today.
     
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  12. TrespassersWilliam

    TrespassersWilliam BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    I don't like the heat and humidity -- although I work in it.

    It is nice to spend a few minutes in a very hot vehicle after work to relax the muscles.
     
  13. backlasher

    backlasher Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I'm old and I can remember growing up without A/C. It's usually above 100 for part of the summer with high humidity and the only explanation I can give is that we didn't know any better. When the big stores in Houston got A/C, the people flocked in to enjoy it but it makes the outside seem twice as hot. Now, I hibernate inside until fall when I can go outside without sweating.
     
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