Summer-time SOLO base weight?

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by Pinnah, Jul 2, 2019.

?

What is your summer-time SOLO base weight (excluding food, water, fuel, and hiking clothing)

  1. Utralight - Under 10 lbs

    8 vote(s)
    14.0%
  2. Light - Under 20 lbs

    32 vote(s)
    56.1%
  3. Traditional - Under 30 lb

    11 vote(s)
    19.3%
  4. Kitchen Sink Class - Above 30 lbs

    6 vote(s)
    10.5%
  1. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    I'm curious to hear what other people's SOLO summer-time base weight is.

    Base weight includes everything that's in your pack excluding consumables like food, water and food and excluding your "normal" trail clothing that you are (presumably) wearing.

    By SOLO, I'm interested in hearing about base weights assuming that you and you alone are carrying shelter and cook system without the aid of partners to help share the load.

    Obviously, if people want to share their packing list too, that would be cool. But I'm primarily interested

    EDITED to Add: My base weight is currently 19 lbs, using a 5+ lb Kelty external frame pack that I'm very, very, very much liking, despite its weight.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2019
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  2. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    I will backpack alone for a while so it is all solo for me. I think my summer pack will weigh about the same as yours. With trek poles, food and water I say the total weight will end up at just under 25 pounds............:dblthumb:. In a small, internal framed Osprey pack......I still have yet to load it up
     
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  3. Jason in ID

    Jason in ID Tracker

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    My base weight is about 12 lbs. I could probably get it under ten but there are a few extra things I like to bring that bump it up.
     
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  4. Todd1hd

    Todd1hd Supporter Supporter

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    In summer I am typically around 9-11 lbs for pack, shelter, sleeping bag/quilt, sleeping pad, cooking equipment, extra clothing, and miscellaneous personal and first aid.

    That being said, this is a backpacking trip, not a Bushcraft adventure. Bushcrafting is a different issue, not as much distance to travel, and more play things like knives, hatchets, fire making tools etc.
     
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  5. Oldguy59

    Oldguy59 Roughian #5 Supporter

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    With my tent, pad, bag , canister stove and pot, FAK, 3 days food and 2 liters water and rain gear and water filter in an Osprey atmos 65 pack I’m at 28lbs. Also carry a knife and a couple lights.
     
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  6. Guttersnipe

    Guttersnipe Supporter Supporter

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    By SOLO, I'm guessing you mean day, or night or two.
    I think I bring more in the way of entertaining myself then what is actually "needed" to be comfortable.

    Oh yeah. Forgot to write less than 20 without food and water.
     
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  7. Newtown Mark

    Newtown Mark Supporter Supporter

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    My solo base weight is Kitchen Sink ++++. But then all my gear floats in the boat:)
     
  8. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I pack "solo" for all my trips... it's kind of a requirement for me, myself, just as a matter of pride in taking care of myself, and I pretty much expect it of others as well (except my wife and daughter.) I taught my daughter to pack light, but cater to my wife and her needs, which are not light. I might share a tent with someone, but I fully expect anyone I'm with to be entirely independent of needing to use my gear. I don't mootch, and don't like borrowers... (I think I was with @Forestree and @MidSouthOutdoors (and maybe @OMRebel was on that trip too) when i forgot my spoon... MidSouth offered a spare, much to my embarrassment... I made one from a piece of wood rather than use his. I can't gripe if I don't apply the standard to myself.)

    As light as I try to go, there's no point in skimping to save half the weight of a 4lb tent when I have a 25oz tarp i could use and have more room under it. On most forum-related trips, I always come prepared to cook for myself, as do most. (However, I am often stunned by the generosity of folks, like the time @lyco.woodsrunner carried in several pounds of elk, i think it was, steaks; or the time @designtom brought in a nalgene full of shrimp and a half dozen skewers for all of us; or when someone left about 10lbs of meat at MeatRock.)

    Canoe tripping isn't much different for me aside from the canoe, paddle, life jacket, and bailer/sponge. Sometimes (especially if the portages are short/easy/few), I'll splurge and bring a chair and/or wannagen box, which makes a nice seat, food storage box, and kitchen. But you can make a nice counter out of a canoe blade, sit pad, rock, or half round of firewood too. Still, my best canoe trips have been with a light pack.

    That said, I'm at around 15lbs base for a summer trip, not counting my clothing worn, boots, and food/water/fuel. I think the "from skin out" figure is more useful, but that's not what you asked for. I'm capable of going into the 12lb range, but that's not how I like to work.

    The biggest differences for me (spring/fall vs summer) are different sleeping covers (30* bag vs 10* quilt, which weighs 8oz more), a 2.5lb layer of field jacket w/liner, and wool gloves. I still bring a knit hat, neck buff, and long johns in summer. In winter, I might bring different boots, and some insulated field pants (3lbs?) The tarp, cooking gear, pack, water stuff, and tools are about the same.

    hope that helps.
     
  9. lyco.woodsrunner

    lyco.woodsrunner by the big White Pine Supporter

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    Interesting thread! Now I will be the weirdo...:D . I honestly can't answer because I have never weighed my load out or even tried to figure it out. Since I am more of a camper than a hiker, most of my distances the last few years have been under 15 miles. Most likely, most are probably closer to the 6-7 mile range truth be told. Since I am still in my mid 40's, I can carry pretty much anything for 6-7 miles....:)

    My load out doesn't differ much summer to winter. Different sleeping bag and some extra layers of clothes. But I'm pretty certain I am least 30 pounds for a multi-day trip summer or winter. @Seeker probably gets a chuckle at me sometimes, just plodding along with my heavy arse pack, not a care in the world.
     
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  10. OMRebel

    OMRebel Meanderer of the Piney Woods Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I put under 30lbs because 1. I's poor and my stuff is heavy, and b. I like to bring stuff to play with. Once I add water and food it gets quite heavy, unless I know there will be a good source of water. I do plan to pick up a lighter bag and sleeping bag which will dramatically reduce my weight. Just waiting on the lottery to pull through...
     
  11. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I’ve not weighed my kit without food and water. Must do...
     
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  12. DarrylM

    DarrylM Supporter Supporter

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    The a/c unit and extension cord puts me in the kitchen sink category.
     
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  13. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    It's like following a friggin' moose... you do not plod... you trot! :D
     
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  14. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    Under 10 for me but that's pretty much always the case until I add in extra clothes and layers for winter along with my DSLR. I'm around 8 and a half before my camera which I like to bring or sometimes just my phone which is about 6 oz. I use the same sleep system 3.5 seasons, but avoid extreme temps, anything below the upper teens or low 70s during sleeping hours I generally avoid. I've found a quilt and Xlite to be very versatile. I get why and how a lot of backpackers use one setup in multiple seasons, environments, and countries.

    I've got a Kelty external frame that weighs a little over 2 lbs. I'm planning on putting a plastic buckle on the belt, and a bottle pocket on the shoulder strap or similar, maybe a mesh pocket on the back. Would be neat to have an old school lightweight pack. Kelty external frames are neat prices of backpacking history. Shame the company is just a shadow of it's former self.
     
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  15. Blackhillz

    Blackhillz Supporter Supporter

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    I'm actually getting my ruck together for a overnighter and after seeing this thread I decided to weigh it and im sitting at 20lbs without water.

    Gear list is as follows,

    Tactical Tailor Fight Light Modular Pack
    Cabela's XPG sleeping pad
    BCO Tarp
    Hammock, tree straps, bugnet
    German M31 Mess Kit
    Emberlit stove
    CRKT eat'n tool
    Rain Jacket
    Spare Socks, Shirt, Boxers
    3 Mt. House Meals, Oatmeal, Instant Potatoes
    2 32oz Nalgeens in 5.11 Canteen carriers
    Mora Garberg
    Bathco Laplander Saw
    Sawyer Mini with squeeze, plus spare mini filter
    Fire kit
    And a few other odds and ends I'm forgetting lol

    Edited to add:

    If I take anything else I'll have to drag out my Allice pack out as this pack is maxed out with the above.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2019
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  16. ROCK6

    ROCK6 Scout

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    I can (and have) get my summer base weight down to about 12-13 pounds, but it often is around 15 pounds only because I have a few comfort items I enjoy brining. I've tried to get below 10 pounds, but just can't get there and if I did, I wouldn't be too comfortable. God-bless the ultralight guys/gals that can get the sub-10 pound base weights! It's just not for me and I'm very comfortable with my base-weights...

    ROCK6
     
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  17. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    That's pretty impressive. If you all don't mind and have the info easily available, I'd like to see your packing lists.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
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  18. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    I find our different approaches to backcountry travel fascinating. But then, I find backcountry travel infinitely interesting to begin with.

    I don't think I've hiked with anybody who has as clearly defined sense of self-reliance and independence as what you've described. That's an observation, not a judgement, just to be clear.

    I did a short stint as a civilian instructor for the military and made some great friends and did some trips with those guys.
    With the folks I went with prior, we always had a sense that we could do certain trips more easily and more safely working together as a team. My military friends took that even further.

    Over the past few years though I'm moving more towards solo packing lists. Mostly this is because my friends (of the same age) are all super-busy and we just don't have the time or energy to by hyper coordinated. We usually coordinate on shelter, stove and a pot to boil water in (we've all pretty much moved to instant just add water meals for simplicity).

    I know one place I can shed a pound is on shelter. My 19lb load is based on a 3lb shelter that can fit 2 and on many trips, that weight is effectively "shared" with a partner. I don't have the money to get my 1 man shelter to 1lb, but 2lbs might be within my grasp using a tarp/bivy combo. I can get really wet here and I'm very hesitant to give up the bivy.
     
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  19. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    I'd like to hear more about that, actually. I generally think of those packs (and I carry and love mine) as being in the 5lb range
     
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  20. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    Our list are very similar.

    I carry a heavier pack and generally don't carry wood processing tools (unless it's a lazy river side trip with my wife). I'd rather carry a light load in a larger pack and not use the pack's full capacity than to run a lighter pack at the limits of its capacity. I'm going to give the Granite Gear 60L Crown a close look though. That might give me the capacity I need while cutting 3lbs of weight. But will it carry close to my Kelty?? I doubt it.
     
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  21. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    I've got three Kelty external frame packs, I don't recall how heavy the fancier ones are but this one is very basic. I believe it's a medium frame. It has a webbing belt with no padding and a metal clamping buckle. The bag is made of a medium/light taffeta. It has zippered pouches on each side an nothing more. Picked it up pretty cheap and actually like the thing quite a bit. One of these days I'd like to swap the shoulder straps and belt for lighter versions and add some sort of way to carry a water bottle. I think it could still be a good light weight option.

    Think of it this way, assuming you have an original Kelty external frame remove the padded belt, extension bar, and add a 2" webbing belt and light pack bag. That's pretty much it. It's surprisingly comfortable to wear as simple as it is.


    Here's my pack list with weights. It's missing a few little things such as my fleece cap, Victorinox Classic SD with ferro rods, and generally some sort of knife around 2 oz. I also tend to bring my phone and or my Cannon SL1 with a 28mm pancake lens.

    Item Name weight in oz
    NeoAir XLite 11.8
    3F UL Gear Lanshan 1 28.3
    Enlightened Equipment Enigma 19.9
    Flash 45 Backpack 36
    Stove 0.5
    bic 0.4
    Ti Mug Pot / Windscreen / hot lips 4.5
    bowl 0.6
    fuel bottle 0.4
    water bottle 1.4
    water bags/scoop 2.9
    filter 2.9
    spork 0.5
    food bag 1.2
    bear bag line kit 2.1
    toothbrush/toothpaste 1
    toilet bag 0.6
    toilet trowel 0.6
    map 0.6
    compass 0.8
    headlamp 1.4
    dity bag 2.6
    Poncho/guy lines 7
    bandana 1
    stakes 2.4

    131.4 oz 8.2125 lbs
     
  22. RiceOnSuede

    RiceOnSuede Scout

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    I have about a 9-10lb base weight for summer, and in between 11-12lbs for winter. I could go lighter but I like to be comfortable.

    https://lighterpack.com/r/38t5vp
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
  23. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Were similar and different. I prefer a larger pack that's not full, dont always get that but ai prefer it. But I opt for the lighter pack and take wood processing tools as firewood here is never a guarantee if you dont have them. I know packers that love them a beefy pack as much as I love my big knife
     
  24. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'm chuckling, and we're good. But I am also too old to be anything but blunt about how I like things. I carried doll clothes for my daughter because that's what we needed to do when she was 6. By the time she was 15, she was packing her own kit, setting up her own part of the camp, handling her own canoe, and all i did was handle my own canoe, hammock/tarp, and cook for us both. I carry about 20 extra pounds of snivel gear for my wife on canoe trips because she doesn't have the skills to make due with less, and wants to have two chairs and a box between them under my Whelen, with a big canopy out front. So i do it.

    And I have NO issue with teaching a newbie IF s/he'll listen. Read my wife's trip report from October 2014, about my 'conditions' for taking her on her first wilderness canoe trip: "you will do things the way i tell you, and wear what i tell you, without fighting me on every bit of it. I'll explain it once, but please trust me, and once you see how it works (and not how it 'looks') you'll get it about the wool socks, nylon pants, and proper shoes I'm demanding you wear." She had several "omg. i get it now!" moments during that trip. Love to see the light bulbs come on. The other side effect was that she quit worrying so much about me being out on my own.

    I was in a leadership position for a number of years in the Army, so I get it about teamwork... I also know that EVERY soldier carried his own water, first aid packet, flashlight, knife, spare socks, poncho, and food. I expect my fellow backpackers to do the same. One of the things I really liked when I did my first outings with @Ossmaninthewild, @OMRebel, @GunGoBoom (all soldiers), @Forestree, @MidSouthOutdoors, @DBX, @saustin1967 (former soldier), and some others from the TX side of the LA/TX border, was that they ALL came fully prepared to support themselves. Were we to plan a week long canoe trip, I have no issue sharing tents, cookware, a party first aid kit, and big tools like hatchet/axe/saw. But when we're all driving from different points to meet up somewhere for a weekend, one should arrive prepared. Do NOT ask me for a bandaid because you forgot yours... you have TP and duct tape (oh, you forgot that too?)... improvise dude... that's what bushcraft is. Oh, you don't know how to do that? here, be happy to show you... but you're still not getting one of my band aids. And a couple trips back, @lyco.woodsrunner and i set up our two normal plowpoints next to each other, as one big one... in doing so, we did not want a rope in front, but extending way off to a distant tree, so we wouldn't be tripping over it near the fire... we shared our rope to make a long enough one for that... but each had brought a shelter that could be set up by itself.

    good conversation, this.
     
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  25. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    my normal "summer" base weight is between 7-10 lbs, longer trips the weight is a little higher as the pack is larger and typically carry a little more in the way of clothing as the mountains tend to be a little tough to accurately predict weather over a longer period

    I've done numerous trips with a 5 lb base weight, but it's a little spartan- adding just a few lbs makes it more comfortable and a little safer

    I've got a two day (60 mile) fastpack coming up this month and my base weight will be around 6 lbs
     
  26. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock So long, and thanks for all the fish Supporter

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    I'm under 14 pounds in the summer.
    15 pounds for three session backpacking.
    And under 20 pounds in winter.
     
  27. La\\//inci

    La\\//inci Tracker

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    No coffee???

    How much Water do you carry???
     
  28. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

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    I have been watching this thread with interest and still haven’t votes. I can totally do under 20, but it usually ends up being under 30. So... why?
     
  29. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    My canoe alone weighs over 40 pounds,,, paddles a couple of pounds more,,, maybe 45 pounds total... It only goes uphill from there.

    Any “hiking” I do, I do with a small daypack, a compass and maps, a few snack bars, a wee med kit, and a pound or so worth of stove/cook set/cup/fuel... Maybe a water bottle, if I’ll be where there is no, or no drinkable, wild water... The stove is for boiling water for tea,,, I don’t drink plain water,,, period.
     
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  30. Blackhillz

    Blackhillz Supporter Supporter

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    Not a coffee guy, as for water it depends on if I have an available water source or not, but usually just 2 32OZ Nalgeens, if I'm going longer stretches between sources I'll bring a 3L CamelBak.
     
  31. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    Sir I believe you have the wrong subforum :18:
     
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  32. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    You are correct
     
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  33. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    I laughed, canoe trips look pretty cool. One of these days I will pick one up. Probably going to be an aluminum one. Not light, but maintenance free and pretty bomb proof.
     
  34. JOttum

    JOttum Nights Watch Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I have no idea what my base weight is. I have my Recon Ruck set up as a multiday bag, just add food and water. I'm a former Infantryman. Most of that time done in Light, Airborne, and Air Assault units. All that is to say I carried it all in with me on my back. Weight isnt a huge issue for me yet. I've been using it to hike with daughter #2 as she works on her hiking merit badge.

    Current contents, from memory:
    In the main compartment-
    USGI head net
    USGI vortex top
    USGI woobie
    1pr of long under wear (to sleep in)
    2pr wool socks

    Attached to left side Molle- FAK
    Left pocket- fire kit with bic lighter, large sized ferro rod and striker, tinder quick and wet fire cubes, bundles of birch bark, UCO matchbox with matches and some PJCs (all this fits in a fox light small pouch)
    Middle pocket-water kit, my big platypus gravity filter and 2 collapsible platy bottles for more water if needed. I am planning to get some micropur tabs to include here.

    Right pocket- shelter kit, BCO 10x 10, aluminum tent stakes, paracord ridgeline kit and about 30' of extra 550 cord

    Right side molle, condor 10x4 water bottle pouch with a full nalgene and a stainless steel nesting mug. I'm looking to add a collapsible twig stove to the exterior pouch here as well.

    In the "radio pouch" if this was a true Alice pack, I have a lot of odds and ends that end up on my person or in my pockets: compass, mora bushcraft, another bic lighter, LMF scout ferro rod, several pocket guides (knots, edibles, animal tracks) probably more 550 :)

    That's the gist of it. On a planned multiday I would add a water bladder in the pack and strap my thermarest to the pack, maybe a wool blanket too. And food.
     
  35. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock So long, and thanks for all the fish Supporter

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    It's all the little things that make packs heavy. 2 ounces here, 6 ounces there. It's all seams pretty light until they start ganging up on you.
     
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  36. Burncycle

    Burncycle Scout

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    Just shy of 16 lbs, could probably shed a pound or so with a lighter backpack. Have been considering a vented one like some that osprey offers.

    Of course after potentially 5 liters of water and food (depending on how hot and how long I'll be out), actual weight would be closer to 28-30 lbs.
     
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  37. CreativeRealms

    CreativeRealms Tracker

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    I put 20 pounds for my answer even though my base weight at the bare minimum is under 10 to account for potential inaccuracies in weight and due to the fact that I like bringing some non essential items with me from time to time as well.
    The same loadout can sometimes be used in the spring/fall since it's still pretty hot outside during those seasons.
    Essential List
    Full Gear List (just for anyone interested)
     
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  38. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    for reference purposes :). this is a 5 lb kit I put together some time ago, got to put it through it's paces on several trips- I don't have much of this kit anymore, have since moved onto a little heavier bits

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    the benefits of a 5 lb pack :D

    [​IMG]
     
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  39. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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    Ah, Grasshopper! You are wise beyond your years. :4:

    Does not water seek its lowest level? Truly, the turtle is not the ox. o_O

    Your post brings to mind the old adage "Penny wise and pound foolish." That saying refers to a different kind of pound, of course, but hey...

    Sometimes people get so fixated on paring their gear down to be absolutely as light as possible that they overlook the fact that NOT having certain items, or carrying the barest minimum of an item, could potentially get them killed.

    So the moral of this story is, always pack responsibly. Don't let them put on your gravestone, "He died for three ounces." :11:

    Ah Grasshopper! For want of a nail...
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
  40. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    :) I do think it's worthwhile to experiment with lighter equipment and push the edges a little; things like site selection, proper pitch, how skimpy you can go with a sleep system (and how skimpy you can't go!), etc are all things reinforced when pushing the edges a little
     
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  41. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    I think it goes hand in hand with backpacking. Any backpacker is pushing the limits and going skimpy when contrasted to car campers or those going RVing. The idea is to pair down to a kit that keeps you sheltered, warm, hydrated, fed, and healthy. Outside of that it's items that bring comfort, support other activities and interest, or provide some kind of added value to the trip.

    I'm working on pushing my limits currently. I'm sure I'll learn a lot from it. But a couple of years ago the idea of a base weight under 10 lbs seemed crazy or only obtainable using the most expensive cutting edge gear. Once I reached that point I realized how underwhelming a kit in that range was. Personally I'd only want to do a scaled down light as possible kit for trips that only focus on making miles. I know the idea of pushing for miles isn't the most popular thing here, but it feels good to push yourself and see what you can accomplish under your own power, and doing so with dynamic, rugged, and beautiful scenery appeals more to me than running on asphalt or something like that. Other trips I'll be spending more time in camp, or trying to get some really nice photos to cheer me up while sitting at work, or do some fishing along the way. I see no reason to limit myself to one type of outing, it's all good in my perspective.
     
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  42. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    There are so many deeper things running through this...

    One is the basic tension of safety, or perceived safety, I think. And the relationship between things and safety and the effect of things on speed, which is itself a safety issue. Or as Chouinard said simply, "Speed is safety", which I think is a bit of an overstatement but I get his point.

    Another issue is one of sustainability, high tech and to a large extent, the whole artificial nature of backpacking as a sport or form of recreation - one that we drive to, succeed or fail at, achieve goals, PRs and tick off list in, all while "getting back to nature". I'm not criticizing. I'm reflecting on my own experiences.

    And yet another is the parallel between a cluttered, overfull pack and my cluttered, overfull calendar, basement and barn. What Wesley referred to as too much "cumber". God save me from the stuff.

    And then there is Muir who got by with "only a tin cup, a handful of tea, a loaf of bread, and a copy of Emerson".
     
  43. Pinnah

    Pinnah Scout

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    This is largely where my group of partners have arrived at with respect to group trips. Shelter and cookware is considered "community gear", loosely coordinated during trip planning and final decisions get made at the trailhead (or sooner). Note, I generally only hike in "tight" groups and the plan heading into the backcountry is that we'll go in together and come out together. I recognize that not everybody approaches it this way and that some prefer the freedom to split up and go their separate ways based on whatever.
     
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  44. saustin1967

    saustin1967 Guide Bushclass I

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    26 lbs, with food and water for a 3 day, winter or summer , I pack the same.
    Where I am in Texas, and as prone as it is to rain when I camp.
    I have learned to be prepared for severe weather changes.
    @Seeker can confirm the Soggy Bottom Boys curse is real.
     
  45. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    A typical summer base list, to which I can add things like a bush chair (8oz), tools (couple pounds), camera/cell phone, mapping stuff (19oz for my full kit). Food runs a standard planning figure of 2lbs per day, say 4lbs for 6 meals/1-2 overnights depending on when you go. Water planning figure is 2x quarts, or 4lbs carried most of the time.


    Sleeping:
    WM Caribou 35°/w/stuff sack/pillowcase 22.2
    Thermarest NEO Air XL 16
    Ground sheet (Tyvek, 3 x 9) 6
    Some really small air pillow 2.7

    Shelter:
    Technora Ridgeline (40') 1
    10x10 BCUSA tarp 25
    Bungi Cord, 18" 2
    Tent Stakes (5) 2.5

    Spare clothing
    Longjohns, Merino wool 8
    Knit hat (orange) 2
    Underwear change 3.5
    Cotton sleep T shirt 7
    Socks, wool 4

    Pack:
    GoLite Gust (w/mods) 20
    Biner to hang pack 1
    Photon w/lanyard 0.3
    Black Trash bag 1.5

    Hygiene:
    Packtowel 1.5
    Washcloth, soap, comb, toothbrush/paste 4.5
    Toilet Paper and wipes 1.5

    Water stuff:
    Platypus 2.5 liter bag 1.3
    Water Bottle(s), 32oz, GatorAde, 2 of them 4
    Polar Pure 5

    Kitchen:
    SuperCat Stove 0.3
    Windscreen 1
    Soda Fuel Bottle-alcohol (8oz, empty) 0.4
    Mors Pot (5-cup, 1.25qt) 8
    Pot chain and bag 2.5
    Scrubbie and small soap bottle 1.5
    Lexan Tablespoon 0.4
    Kool-Aid jar bowl w/ lid and cozy 2.9
    Plastic Mug-clear blue Lexan, 2c 3.5
    Bic Lighter, Large 1

    BCUSA Poncho 14
    Headlamp, Black Diamond Gizmo 2.5
    Repair Kit 1.5
    First Aid Kit 1
    Sit-pad 3

    Total base eqpt carried in my pack is 186 oz, or 11.625 lbs

    Worn:
    Hat 3.5
    Propper pants w/knee pads 28
    T-Shirt-poly blend 6
    Nylon Khaki CampMor Shirt 10
    Underwear 3.5
    Socks-wool 4
    Merrill hiking shoes 37
    Fisheye Compass and Knife lanyard (no knife) 1
    SAK Fieldmaster/Huntsman 4
    Lighter, micro-light, and whistle w/lanyard 2

    Total worn is 99 oz, or 6.1875 lbs

    So that takes it to about 18 lbs, plus 4lbs of food for 2 days and 4lbs of water to start, plus a few more ounces of fuel alcohol, which, iirc, wieghs .82 oz/liquid ounce, say 2oz per day), so about 26lbs, plus the tools mentioned earlier, generally keeps it under 30lbs.
     
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  46. Juicin

    Juicin Tracker Banned

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    Hmm i'm not really sure on exact weight but with a little googling I'll try to guess.

    4 pounds on coleman big and tall bag

    Probably another 3 on my poly tarp (shelter and backpack)

    ~5/6 on various items of clothing, cordage, containers, and my backpack straps.

    Another 5 pounds on cook kit, water containers, and filtration

    And then maybe another 5 up to 10 depending on the bladed tools and electronics I bring. Also have to add in a bit for navigation, first aid, and other comforts like a chair/groundsheet etc
     
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  47. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    19 pounds. plus poles and clothing I wear......Everything else is 19 pounds for an overnighter. I can trim that down a couple pounds. If I could get to 15 pounds I would jump up and down (without the pack on) and whistle dixie whilst eating raw fish (maybe).

    You light weights have got me going allright 20190708_183324.jpg
     
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  48. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    Post a pack list and we'll do a shakedown :D

    Careful what you ask for :18:

    Are we talking 15 lbs with food, fuel and water or base weight?
     
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  49. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    Uh oh!.....

    My 19 pounds now has food, fuel and H2O. So it would be with food, water and fuel. I have a wood stove but no fuel. To be honest, I dont have a list. I just keep going thru the stuff over and over. But I will make a written list and take photos.

    It could happen, eh? the first thing i could dump would be these luxuries. But man, did they feel nice after about 6 miles in boots (the slippers)......... 20190710_164927.jpg
     
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  50. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    19 lbs with food and water isn't bad at all. Assuming at least 2.2 lbs for water and 3 + lbs of food.

    I wouldn't know about the boots, I've never hiked in a pair. Used them for plenty of other things but never hiking or backpacking. I do enjoy a pair of Crocs in camp or areas with a lot of water crossing. But if I'm going light or more for miles I leave them behind. I've been eyeing some light camp shoes for certain trips though, we'll see.
     

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