"Surprise" blizzard while out hunting in the mountains - would you make it?

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by actiondiver, Mar 13, 2019 at 7:29 PM.

  1. actiondiver

    actiondiver Tracker

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    Today's "Snow Bomb" in Colorado came on the heels of mid 60's weather. When out elk hunting I try to stay up on the weather, but sometimes do not due to lack of cell signal and not messing around with radios.

    The sudden and seriousness of the storm today has me wondering how well I would fare in such a condition. I think I might make it if caught out in it over night, but 80 mile an hour winds and blowing 20" of snow is not to be taken lightly.

    I typically camp next to my jeep in a tent off of 4x4 trails and then hike into the mountains to the areas I like that are usually about 4 miles one way, then hike out at night. It makes for a long day and I try to travel light, yet prepared. I almost exclusively wear wool layers and take a waterproof shell jacket. I think taking googles, waterproof pants, full glove in addition to the fingerless wool gloves I normally wear, and a balaclava would make a big difference without adding too much bulk and weight.

    Has anyone on here been caught out on foot in such conditions? How did you do? What gear was a saving grace.
     
  2. nomad orphan

    nomad orphan Tracker

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    I love the mountain. spend months at a time...

    weather changes so fast.

    usually have a small pack at hand, but always
    have a knife and bic on me.
    climbing tape wrapped around the lighter...
    a flashlight and a pitbull.
    (never know when you'll need a snack)

    if I did the survival show.... I would wear a huge cotton and wool wedding dress as my survival item.
     
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  3. Lars

    Lars Angry German Supporter

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    Today's blizzard was not really a surprise yet there are over 600 cars stranded in Colorado Springs and 1100+ on Interstate 25. I am glad I had cancelled my travel plans for today a few days ago.

    Regarding hiking in the mountains. Even in the summer, I always take good rain jacket and pants with me as well as a down jacket and a beanie. Rain jacket with down jacket underneath always provides some good warmth.
     
  4. Hawkcreek

    Hawkcreek Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I have been out in that weather but I wasn't alone. Due to poor decision making by higher ups we ended up skijoring at night during a blizzard in Norway. I don't know the numbers but it was cold and the wind was blowing hard (hard enough I couldn't see people 3 feet away from me).
    Probably because we were skijoring and as such "tied" together nobody got lost out there. We ended up taking shelter on the leeward side of a hill, put up squad shelters and waited.

    A small daypack can carry a lot of "survival" stuff. I like the HPG Tara because it is small so I don't feel compiled to overpack it with junk, it stays close to the body/doesnt flop around, but carries everything needed for a days outing plus has room for survival stuff.
     
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  5. actiondiver

    actiondiver Tracker

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    Good plan and how I pack too for the summer.
     
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  6. actiondiver

    actiondiver Tracker

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    Just had to look up Skijoring, sounds like a fun, but tiring task. I had seen training video of it in the past, just did not know what the name for it was.
     
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  7. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter

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    Under those deteriorating conditions survival gets immediately serious.
    Would I make it?
    As always, “It depends.” I know I would do everything I could, use everything available and draw on all my experience to survive. Sometimes no matter how skilled you are luck is the deciding factor. Hopefully, if you’re caught in a whiteout, you’re caught close to some sort of natural shelter, that you’ve got clothing enough and gear enough to protect you for the duration of the worst of the storm.
     
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  8. John from Alberta

    John from Alberta Supporter Supporter

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    Growing up hiking/camping in the Rockies we always knew that the weather could change 100 times in the course of a day. I've been backpacking in July and ended up in a massive hailstorm, and I've dealt with snow on more summer camping and hiking trips than I can count. I would say we're not generally caught off guard, mostly because of the fact that I grew up here and have come to expect anything, so I pack for anything. I was always jealous of the folks in my Backpacker magazine who had the luxury of being able to use a summer rated sleeping bag, even in July I wouldn't venture out without a -10'c bag (14'f), I've never owned a bag rated above that. I've only ever once had the guts to sleep in a tent without the rain fly on. On hiking trips I'll always have a down jacket and waterproof shell, as well as a small survival kit.

    The older I've gotten, and as my family has grown, I've definitely considered purchasing a SPOT or other emergency beacon for my more remote trips.
     
  9. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    from what I saw on the news, unless you were very close to your vehicle, this probably isn't one you gut it out hiking; having said that, first priority would be to find a place to get out of most of the weather- which possibly might only be burrowing down into the snow- extra insulating layers, a lightweight sleep system, a length of ccf pad and a waterproof bivy or bothy

    I can tell you short of carrying a full on 4 season tent and winter rated bag/pad, it's really (really) going to suck. BUT you should make it.

    I've been carry a sat communicator of some sort for the last 10 years.
     
  10. Pablo

    Pablo Guide

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    Blizzards in the mountains are far more survivable than blizzards on the plains. I grew up in the mountains of Colorado, so I've experienced most what it can throw at you (which can be quite serious).... HOWEVER, I've since seen what a nasty winter blizzard in Iowa or Nebraska looks like, and I'll take a mountain blizzard any day over the frozen, windswept, ice-covered Hades the plains can become in December. The intense, unrelenting wind, bitter, humid cold, total lack of cover or firewood in some places, and the potential for freezing rain can pack a nasty wallop.
     
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  11. tristndad

    tristndad Supporter Supporter

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    Not quite the same, but relateable. As a teenager I hit the ice around 4am to try and pull some walleye up through the hole. I was snug as a bug inside my portable shantee and unaware of what was happening outside. Well when I finaly got off my chair to take a look outside I was taken back by the amount of snow that had fallen in just a couple hours, and it was still coming down. I could barely see my own hands when I held them out in front of my face it was soo white. Long story short, I was inexperienced and never thought to face my door in the direction of the car. I was only about a half mile from where I had parked, but had no sense of direction. I eventually made it to the car after walking to the wrong side of the lake It was one hell of a battle trying to pull my sled through the fresh deep snow with wind blowing and basically being blind.

    If I were to relate this story to the situation you described, the first thing that comes to mind is GPS with a coordinate of my base camp stored in it. That is if I were going to chance trying to hike it back instead of trying to hunker down and waiting it out.
     
  12. John from Alberta

    John from Alberta Supporter Supporter

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    Agree! Calgary is quite literally the dividing line between the foothills and the prairies. Head 30 minutes east and you’re in flat farm country, 30 minutes west and you’re at the base of the Rockies. I’ll head west into a storm any day over heading east.
     
  13. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    blizzard? what is this blizzard of which you speak? :)
     
  14. wrath0r

    wrath0r Supporter Supporter

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    If I'm going a mile or more from my vehicle, I'll have my poncho, ridge line, and stakes, and a first aid kit with me. My first aid kits all have a space blanket, among other things. I do think these would help me, assuming the stars aligned for me.

    I don't generally venture that far in the winter but, if I did, an addition to my first aid kit would be several hand warmers. I think that, in a pinch, those can be used to maintain your core temperature a bit. Perhaps tuck them into my armpits, or tape them to my chest. This is not something I have spent time researching yet (it's on the list), but I do think that, when used in conjunction with insulators they can really help.
     
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  15. John from Alberta

    John from Alberta Supporter Supporter

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    Hand warmers are great. I buy them in bulk. I get the 18 hour Hot Hands which are amazing and have consistently lasted at least as long as stated, and occasionally longer. They also get super hot. If I’m going out in particularly cold weather (-20’c or colder), I’ll open them up before I leave and just have them in my pockets to warm up anything hat might need it on demand.
     
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  16. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    i simply can't imagine being in circumstance where i'd have to face such sudden conditions. i can imagine that if i lived in a place where such conditions COULD occur, i'd know to be prepared ...
     
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  17. Sodak

    Sodak Scout

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    I've been out in situations similar to this, when I was in the Army. We had set up with good GP Med and Small canvas tents with heaters, and were good to go. Maybe that's cheating...

    I agree with others, living in Colorado, when I travel to the mountains, I'm very prepared, or I don't go. The news here in Denver have been hyping this thing for over a week. In the city, we got some wind and drifting, but a blizzard? Hardly. The eastern plains of the state are another story. I spent a lot of my childhood on the eastern plains of South Dakota, and those blizzards were absolutely terrifying. In '74 we had a 3 day blizzard of 60 mph, and -40 temps. Drifts were easily 5 - 10 ft. Google the "Children's Blizzard" of 1888 for descriptions of a true monster...
     
  18. lopie

    lopie Scout

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    I'm not sure you can build a shelter in these winds. I walked to a friend's house and had to lean into the wind. Except that it occasionally was swirling so easy to lose footing.
     
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  19. VtBlackDog

    VtBlackDog Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    No problem.....here in Vermont you find a condo or shopping mall over every hill.
     
  20. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    Fortunately we don't see much extreme weather here on the Eastcoast, but these are good mental exercises to consider. I'd have my usual EDC Felix Magic Bag (~10 lb/L, incl 3.5lbs of food/water) with me so:
    - if close enough to hike out, I'd wear the extra 'suit' - windshirt, windpants, and poncho/tent stuffed under windshirt as a puffy mid layer... good for ~25-30F temp drop.
    - if sheltering in place, I'd storm pitch the poncho/tent low (mid tents are quite good in wind/snow), sit/lie down on small ground pads (air and CCF), use groundsheet as a blanket wrap, and run an alcohol stove as a Palmer Furnace underneath, or maybe just boil for a hot water bottle. I can use the Palmer Furance in three positions (in my chair, cross-legged, or lying down in a fetal position) to reduce the misery, maybe catch some sleep.
    - have a robust bushcraft kit in there as well (saw, wedge, bellows, ferro, lighter, tinder), but assume it will be counterproductive to build fires for warmth in blizzard conditions.

    Lastly, I'd add my Inreach sat com if venturing that far out in the wilderness, but I suspect you'll still have to wait out the storm before anyone would consider a rescue.

    My take-aways from thought exercise: reminder to DWR treat the windpants; groundsheet needs to be regular 3'x7' footprint size for a complete floor-to-neck Palmer Furnace seal (adds a bit of weight/bulk); Tyvek's breathability is better for use as a blanket bivy, but PolyCryo transparency is better to rig tent as a super-shelter.
     
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  21. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    yeah in those conditions a fire isn't going to be a likely candidate, you should obviously have fire starting stuff with you- but another strategy if a fire is a no go

    on a recent overnighter I had truly blizzard conditions and there was no possible way to start (or sustain) a fire, fortunately I had a solid four season tent, 0 degree bag and warm pad to ride it out- even then the wind was so strong that it gave me pause :)
     
  22. wrath0r

    wrath0r Supporter Supporter

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    It's a thing I always have, and a poncho can be a decent wind breaker and help protect the thermal blanket.
     
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  23. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    As a minimum, I've got a SAK, lighter, compass, whistle, and micro-lite on lanyards in my pockets. I almost always have contingency stuff in my daypack... I carry a poncho and a small waterproof bag that includes TP, FAK, repair kit, lighter, some sort of firestarter (candle, PJ cottonballs, whatever), and a headlamp. Sometimes there are extra batteries and cordage. More often than not, I also have my brew kit with me (Olicamp aluminum cup, GSI plastic mug, alcohol or esbit burner, salt, sugar, tea, pot chain, another lighter, spoon), and usually with the brew kit is a small bottle full of rice, dried bean powder, bouillon, and dried corn for a stew base. I usually have some other sort of food/snack with me, jerky being a favorite. Sometimes I add a small saw and sheath knife. I almost always have a knit hat and neck gaiter as a 'layer', but am learning more about living here (MD) as I go... I have a small down vest that I will probably be adding to the mix... just too light not to take.

    Can't say that would get me through a snow storm, but I can make a Palmer Furnace and that will probably get me through most of my local weather most of the year.
     
  24. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    Been on searches with horizontal sleet deliberately heading into it ,but never surprised .
    but then I usually always carried a full pack because in the mountains you never know what you are running into.
     
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  25. Mfraser161

    Mfraser161 Tracker

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    I don’t leave anything to chance. Winter time when I’m out bush I’m carrying my bergen with everything I need. Can go from warm sunny day to cold as cold here in a few hours.
    Regardless of the temp at the time of departure I always take my full pack. Maybe I’ll hump it around all day and curse it but I know eventually the day will come when I’ll be needing it to survive. I’m in the same Canadian Rockies area as @John from Alberta and things can change fast here too.
    3812C031-A0DC-44B7-97DB-15C3DB920EB1.jpeg
     
  26. Barry J

    Barry J Guide

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    In whiteout conditions, with high winds, seems like it would be danged hard to build a fire and keep it going, if you were even able to find dry wood and tender. An alcohol stove may be a better option, due to the light weight.
    Also, I would be real cautious about setting up near a cliff face, due to the possibilty of what could be blown over on top of me. I know you have to get out of the wind, but be aware of what's above you.
     
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  27. salty dog

    salty dog Supporter Supporter

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    I've rarely hunted anywhere but in the east, and we don't get too many blizzards. Even a snow forecast of a few inches causes the shelves at the grocery store to be emptied quick. Then again, we rarely hunt more than a mile from a vehicle so it works out. I have lasted through several hurricanes, so I do know a little about high winds. So to answer the question: If I was facing an unexpected 80 MPH blizzard, I wouldn't try to set up a shelter or start a fire. I would find the most protected spot I could see, wrap myself in whatever I had that was weather resistant, and wait it out. I don't know if that would be successful, but it seems better than walking four miles in the storm you're talking about. Hopefully all of us sitting warm and dry in front of our keyboards will never find out.
     
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  28. Pablo

    Pablo Guide

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    In deep snow, a snow shelter would be my choice if wind and intense cold was on the menu.
     
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  29. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ I think digging in would be a prudent plan- if it's winter, I'm carrying a small avy shovel just for this reason; snowshoes can be brought into service if need be as well. During elk season I don't bring a shovel, very occasionally snowshoes if the snow is deep enough to warrant it (but that is often mutually exclusive of finding elk).

    I wonder if something along the lines of a Snowclaw would be worth bringing in cases where a shovel (or snowshoes) aren't along. Maybe a HPDE sheet that could double as a backpack frame????
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 9:04 PM
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  30. Barry J

    Barry J Guide

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    Your idea of an HDPE sheet is excellent! I just ordered a 1/4x 12 x 24 inch sheet. I will cut two 10" x 12" sheets. I will put one in my pack and one in my wife's pack. They will be used as cutting boards for food prep, eating plates, shoveling snow and as a backing plate for my pack.
     
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  31. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    I know I keep posting this, but the guy's a world-class high Alpine winter climber.

     
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  32. Blackhillz

    Blackhillz Supporter Supporter

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    I'm in the same camp, I'll haul my full pack with my gear. Does it suck hauling it up and ridges hunting, or exploring? Yep. But there is always the chance something happens and I'm stuck for a night or two before I'm found or can get back to my truck. (I tend to be well off the beaten path, 95% of my time in the woods).

    Great pic by the way, been wanting to get my hands on one of those PLCE packs.
     
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  33. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    Having the right clothing is half the battle already won; so many folks just don't set out with the right clothing- which in the summer you can usually (but not always) get by, shoulder season and winter- you're setting yourself up for failure, sometimes catastrophic failure
     
  34. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    I just ordered some too :) stuff is pretty light and should provide a little rigidity to a day pack
     
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  35. WhisperInThePine

    WhisperInThePine Wubba lubba dub dub Supporter

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    I posted a while ago in a thread of an experience I had while laying out a timber sale boundary in winter. Weather forecast was cloudy - mostly cloudy, no wind or precip. This was two years ago now, which was a heck of a winter. I had to snowshoe in 2 miles to the sale area, which meant carrying everything for the day with me. .

    In winter at work, I carry a crazy creek folding chair, figuring it works as a chair and a makeshift pad to insulate my core, and a grabber space blanket. I always carry a hatchet, knife and fire kit as well. As I was out for the day, I also had food and a thermos of hot tea. I wear wool head to toe in winter; base layers and outer layers

    That day I needed everything, as a freak storm hit. At first, I didn't think much of it, but after 15 minutes, I began to think this might be serious. I found cover under a bushy juniper, laid flat the chair and covered myself with the space blanket. The chair when laid flat will extend from my shoulders down to below my rear, so my core is covered (I could also shove my feet and calves into my backpack, but my knees are still exposed). I hunkered down in that cover for maybe another 30 to 40 minutes, drank my tea and ate some food, but I was starting to get a little stir crazy. There was no telling when it would stop. The winds were blinding, even with wrap around sunglasses. That temperature dropped fast too, I remember. It was not wet snow, like you get in the low 30s, it was the stuff you see when it's in the low 20s. I figured it was safer to remain in place, as I was just off a ski trail, rather than walk 2+ miles back to the truck.

    Fortunately, it was relatively short lived, about an hour. It was a good test of my gear, and I was actually fairly comfortable all things considered. Most of the discomfort came from anxiety. I still carry this same kit in winter.
     
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  36. Barry J

    Barry J Guide

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    Sounds like you have a real good kit!
    Thanks for telling us this story.
     
  37. Mfraser161

    Mfraser161 Tracker

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    Thanks ! They’re a great surplus pack , can hold everything including the kitchen sink lol
     
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  38. Mfraser161

    Mfraser161 Tracker

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    @Blackhillz
    It Makes a good rest for shooting prone as well. I was out for a few hours shooting yesterday with my SKS. Had my ground pad down and used the pack as a rest for the rifle.
    BBB32B0D-005E-4857-BDC6-4313AF2A479A.jpeg C4FF38CA-7F3F-4602-A95E-3A4E952917BC.jpeg C924F748-5833-4A38-A2A8-4D5BC86B61DD.jpeg
     
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