The Build Along

Discussion in 'Archery' started by longcruise, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    The depth should be right on two inches and the width at the widest about 1 1/8".
     
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  2. Derzis

    Derzis Scout

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    Nice!
    This is off the main subject question: Are there any kind of glues to use for building a longbow without requiring the heat-box treatment?
     
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  3. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    You can use the EA40 (Smooth On) without a heat box. It will cure in 24 hours at room temperature or a minimum of 70 degrees. I have cured bows that way and never had an issue.
     
  4. Derzis

    Derzis Scout

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    Thank you! I have to try this one day.
     
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  5. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    I did the final rubbing out of the finish today. The simple ingredients were cooking oil a paper towel and pumice. I soak a bit of oil into the paper towel spread some pumice and rub the Finish. It can be done just as well without a paper towel just using your hands.

    IMG_20181108_153524071-800x600.jpg
    Here's how it looks after rubbing out. It falls between a gloss and a satin finish.
    IMG_20181108_155101777_crop_655x219.jpg
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    Next will be the leather wrap for the grip.
     
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  6. jonathan creason

    jonathan creason Scout

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    That is looking awesome!
     
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  7. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    Thanks, Jonathan.

    It's time to wind this up. Next up is the grip wrap to be done in leather. I went with black because it matches with the black glass on back and goes well with the yellow osage riser.

    First step is to cut the leather. It's very simple on this type of grip since it's just a rectangle. But, size is important. It needs to be a bit smaller than the circumference to allow it to be stretched and drawn tight. Here's our piece of leather cut and ready.
    IMG_5649.JPG

    Next step is to mark for our punch. You can do this with a ruler and just make a pencil prick where each hole goes or you can do as I did and use this marker. The marker is quicker but either method is simple and fast.

    IMG_5650.JPG

    The important thing here is that both ends of the grip leather be the same exact length and that the marks match perfectly across between the ends. It's ready to punch now.
    IMG_5651.JPG

    A specific leather punch is desireable but you can make a punch out of a nail or anything that strikes your imagination. Here we are all punched out.
    IMG_5652.JPG
    Next is the leather dye. I'm using Fiebings Pro Dye in black. I saturated it twice to be sure the color was even.

    IMG_5653.JPG

    It's allowed to thoroughly dry for several hours.
     
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  8. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    Next we are going to stitch it up but not on the bow. We'll do it off the bow and leave it loose so we can slide it over the bow and into place where the stitches will be pulled tight.

    IMG_5655.JPG

    It's done with a single piece of cord with a needle at each end and done in a cross stitch. Many incorrectly refer to this as a baseball stitch but it is not a true baseball stitch.

    IMG_5657.JPG

    Next we saturate the leather with water to allow it to be stretched and then slide it onto the bow and into position and pull the thread tight.
    IMG_5658.JPG

    IMG_5659.JPG
     
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  9. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    Here it is completed. When the leather is dry it will have pulled tight around the handle. Then I treat it with Sno Seal to waterproof it and it also gives it a bit of stickiness to the hand and keeps it from sliding around in the hand.
    IMG_5660.JPG
    IMG_5661.JPG
    IMG_5663.JPG
     
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  10. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    The bow of course needs a bowstring. I'll only say this about bowstrings. If you are going to build bows you need to learn how to make bowstrings.

    There are several ways to make a bowstring. The two most common methods in the US today is the endless loop method and the Flemish splice method. The are both good ways to build a string and neither is that difficult to do. Generally you would use a jig to build either one but in fact a jig is not necessary with either. To build a flemish string, the jigs purpose is solely to help you cut the correct length of strands for the bundles you will splice. Usually two or three bundles. If you know how long the string is to be and how long to cut the strands to make the bundles it's a simple task to make a string with no jig.

    The same is true of the endless loop string. A couple of nails in your pocket, a knife, a hatchet, string and a serving tool and you are ready to make your string in the bush.

    On the other hand, if you have the foresight to always have a spare broken in string with you it won't be necessary to build a string while sitting on a log.:)

    That's enough of my rambling! This string will be built on an endless loop jig. The material will be black B55 string material and green #4 serving material. I'm just going to do this is pictures for those who may be curious but as far as lengthy explanations go, that would be an entirely different topic.

    The two ends of the jig

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    It's a 12 strand string so we go around six times.
    IMG_5668.JPG

    Then we rotate the double end to serve off the first loop.

    IMG_5672.JPG
    And use the serving tool to wrap the loop. Once it's wrapped we rotate the bars and wrap the actual loop in.
    IMG_5673.JPG
    IMG_5674.JPG
     
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  11. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    The pictures aren't very good. I usually do strings outdoors on the patio but it was 17 degrees so it was made in my rather dark basement.

    The center serving is done with the string on the bow and is a very simple matter of winding it on with the serving tool.

    Here are some pictures of the completed bow with string.

    IMG_5677.JPG
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    And one last picture, this is a simple alternative to doing a grip wrap. It's done with heavy cotton string that is soaked in water then wound onto the grip. Once it's wound on and dry it is saturated with a water based poly such as the min wax type. Saturate, dry then saturate again and dry. I have one bow with this type of wrap that has been used more than any other bow over the past five years and it is holding up nicely.
    IMG_5680.JPG
     
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  12. Derzis

    Derzis Scout

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    Great looking bow and I really like the heavy cotton string wrap as well.
    These days I am shooting my ASL without leather wrap or leather on the shelf or side, just bare bows. Stephen Graf with his “The American Longbow: How to Make One, and Its Place in a Good Life.” book inspired me to try this way. Using just wood arrows helps.
     
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  13. longcruise

    longcruise Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    I haven't read Grafs book but given the reviews I'm going to order it.

    Wood arrows are my choice too. Not just for nostalgia sake. They behave better than anything else I've tried in my ASLs.

    I like the leather wrap and enjoy doing them but my own present stable is string wrapped or bare.
     

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