The S**t Hit The Fan But I’m A Prepper, What Can Go Wrong…? (Article)

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Harper, Dec 7, 2018.

  1. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    ---

    Here are some interesting observations from people who lived through the recent California fires:

    Source: http://www.survivaldan101.com/the-st-hit-the-fan-but-im-a-prepper-what-can-go-wrong/


    The S**t Hit The Fan But I’m A Prepper, What Can Go Wrong…?

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    Since this is mostly a preparedness website, the majority of our readers are preppers with different opinions and approaches to this matter of course. I read and write preparedness articles for quite some time now and I have come to understand that when TSHTF, the easy answer for what to do and where to go is…. there is no easy answer and there are too many variables to give you a definite, “hey, this is it, you should do this”. What I can do instead is to tell you what not to do and/or make you think from a different approach but ultimately you need to come with your plan for your family depending on where you live, how many people you prepare for and so on.

    One of our readers shared his experience a few days ago in the comment section of
    What You Need To Do In The First 60 Minutes Of A Sudden SHTF that lead to this article.

    Via grayfox114:

    The first 60 minutes??? I recently wrote and submitted an article to another prepper site, I don’t know if it will be published or not, about changes made to my plans as a prepper/die-hard “bug in advocate” as a result of the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif. I live in Northern Idaho………….The people in Paradise did not have 60 minutes, or 30 or even 15……..Many, a personal acquaintance or two of mine, said they had less than 5 minutes, after being warned of the fires approach, to get dressed, grab something like car keys, and flee. They were unable to take much of anything with them. The fire was spreading at the rate of 1000 feet a minute, or faster! The article I wrote and submitted dealt with putting together a “bug out trailer,” stocked with essentials and ready to roll at a moments notice if disaster threatens. The trailer would not be a war wagon but would contain essential items that a person could use in the event of a bug out, items that would make a person an evacuee rather than a refugee dependent on local government and charitable organizations for every need! If the article I wrote is not published, I will post it here if anyone is interested!”

    As you can see, sometimes no matter how well prepared you might be or what your initial plan was, there is a chance that you get separated from your family or your retreat point and in the havoc caused you won’t be able to reach them. Having several backup plans can save your life.

    (Cont.)
     
  2. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    Another comment on the same article from Prepper Girl :

    I live in Northern California and had to evacuate due to a Forest fire that came within a mile of my home. Looking back on the experience I see that I did many things wrong. I wasted time trying to find out where the fire was. We saw the smoke, and falling ash, ( which should have told us that it was close.) I called around to friends and neighbors in the area but no one seemed to know where the fire was. We started putting our bug out items, food and water, and important papers into our 5th wheel. At that time we had a lot of animals and I spent a lot of time preparing to evacuate them. By the time we saw the police at our gate telling us to leave immediately, we panicked.
    We were hitched up to our truck at this point and left, leaving some animals behind. By the time we reached the end of our road we were wanting to go back to lock up the house, leave water and food for the animals we left behind, but law enforcement would not allow us to do so. We were evacuated for 6 days not knowing if our home was gone, looted, or if our animals had survived. Looking back, I should have opened a large bag of dog food and left it on the ground. We normally leave large buckets of water available. Animal control was able to get in after 4 days and rescue the dogs and farm animals, so they survived. I know that every situation is different, and even to those of us who think we are prepared for SHTF, there are always surprises. Now we keep our trailer stocked year around and hitched to our truck during fire season. Bug out bags is always in our car. And extra water.
    We cut down to a manageable number of animals. This past summer we had 3 large devastating fires all within 30-40 miles. We were ready to go if need be.”

    I write a lot about preparedness, but nothing is more important than being aware of the risk of disasters in your area, this is especially the case for disasters. If you have a slight risk of bushfires or wildfires in your area, then you need to brush up on your fire preparedness in this guide.

    Fire, earthquakes or floods preparedness are necessary because they are unpredictable, large, rapid and overwhelmingly dangerous disasters. Preparing and planning is a strategy to not only be ready for a fire but to prepare for everything that happens alongside it, such as power, cell phone reception and radio signals not being available, meaning there is no way to hear alerts, call for help or charge a phone.

    The overwhelming truth in all these scenarios, once again, comes down to a single focus. It’s not the EMP, the cyber attack, or the solar flare that is going to kill you. Your plans MUST include several scenarios and staying as far away from the starving masses as possible. Aside from the resurgence of long-forgotten diseases like cholera and dysentery from poor sanitation and hygiene outlined in this article After The SHTF Most Diseases That Have Long Been Eradicated In The Developed World Will Once Again Rear Their Ugly Heads, And Many Unprepared Will Die , the starving and desperate masses (even the everyday Joes) are going to be the real killers. So maybe I’ve convinced you to second guess some of your plans. Now what? Back to square one? Not quite. All the supplies and food you’ve already attained is still needed. You just need to move them far away from the population centers and you can actually do this on a budget. Don’t bank on the fact that you are going to have a running vehicle or clear roads to load up all your gear and bug out of town. Regardless, you must get out of town which means bugging out. To do so requires a pre-organized plan of action though.

    Tornadoes, hurricanes, fires, earthquakes—there are few areas of the country with no natural disaster risks, and a nuclear war, terrorism, and disease outbreaks could happen nearly anywhere. So what factors drive some people to respond to those risks by being prepared to face them without both private and government services or any sort of emergency support?

    I will respond to that question with another comment from this website posted by benny w wallace on Why You Shouldn’t Wait for the Government To Save You After SHTF :

    ”Having spent years, from 1973-2011, in the law enforcement community in rural Northern California, I had and have a working knowledge of the disaster preps and assistance available to the people of the county I worked in as a deputy…..or should I say the total lack of preps and assistance, in the event of a disaster. During the years I was there, the county experienced several relatively minor events: Flooding that was basically localized, wildfires that threatened some areas, and heavy snows that took out electricity and blocked roads. All these were temporary events, lasting 5 or fewer days. Our sheriff, being the chief “civil defense/disaster chief guru,” used his deputies as best as possible. We provided traffic control, transportation, and information, mostly because that’s all we could do. We did have a surplus Army 6x, but for what I don’t know. There were no backup supplies of food, first aid supplies, bedding or clothing available that I was aware of. Everything depended on what was “there at the time.” A shelter was available in county buildings and schools, but that was about it. I have no doubt that surrounding areas were in similar straits. The county was essentially dependent on aid arriving from outside sources to take up any slack, and the local population seemed oblivious to the fact they were living on the edge of a precipice.

    With resources stretched thin handling these minor events, I, being a long time prepper/survivalist/cynic, often wondered what would happen in the event of something truly catastrophic, such as a major quake(we lived in a seismically active area) or an eruption of Mt Lassen, an active volcano within spitting distance, or any number of governmentally precipitated events leading to massive social unrest? We were totally unprepared to deal with anything approaching a major event. Trying to bring this unpleasant fact to the attention of those in charge was an exercise in frustration…..the PTB were either complacent about things, (I would use the word complicit) they were too busy playing politics to deal with such an unpleasant subject or they were of the opinion that I was “The sky is falling” type of individual. They stumbled along, smug in the knowledge that they would retire with fat pensions, while never having really served their constituents.

    There will be a day of reckoning, it’s a when not if thing……What I described is a microcosm of preparedness in California and possibly America………..People seem to have overlooked past history and what the government, local/state/federal, will or won’t, can or can’t do, and it is going to bite them in the as big time! Failing to prepare is preparing to fail, and placing all your needs in the hands of any other then God or one’s self is foolhardy the max! Never become a refugee!!!!”

    I could go on and post hundreds of comments like the ones I posted in this article, whether you are new to prepping or you are doing it for years, there is always something new to learn in the comments, real-life experiences are the best way to learn. Please feel free to share your experiences in the comment section or email me and I will post them so the others readers can learn.
     
  3. Walking Crow

    Walking Crow Supporter Supporter

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    Ah, @Harper, you obviously put considerable time into finding and posting these articles that hang little clusters of the reality that others have experienced, on our Bushcraft tree. To me, it is rather sad that they don't seem to generate the views or discussion that we might think they deserve. I guess I "get it" that most folks don't come to BushcraftUSA to be reminded of the possible negative outcomes that they may encounter in their lives. Perhaps some do come here to learn skills that may mitigate those negative outcomes and need no reminders.

    I guess true reality is that we will never be able to completely prepare for all possible circumstances and putting all our "eggs" in either the bug in or bug out basket only works if we guess right. And even if we guess right, it only works if our preparation is sufficient for the duration of the event. Of course if our "preparation" is based of physical possessions, then the prep is valid only as long as we can retain those possessions, including consumables. After all, by existing Executive Orders (USA), in time of a properly declared emergency, pretty much all food and water belong to the federal government. Our skills, however, cannot be taken unless our ability to move about freely is taken from us or any tools on which we depend are denied to us.

    Let us pray that we never face some of the "worst case" scenarios we've heard about. But even in the smaller but still dramatic events, Katrina, Sandy, the recent fires, lives were turned upside down (and some were lost), and often years are required to get those lives back together. Those folks don't make it to the MSM sound bite parade, but their struggles are no less real.

    And if one or more of the "large" catastrophic events come our way, most will still be unprepared; many of those who think they are prepared will find their preps lacking; and some, including, no doubt, some BCUSA folks will pull together some physical resources to support their extensive skill sets and will persevere, just as adaptive humans have been doing for a long, long time.

    Thanks again, Harper, for the reality checks....
     
  4. Midwest.Bushlore

    Midwest.Bushlore Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I like the articles! To me wildfire is one of the most sobering of disasters. Despite the political ramblings from both sides there really isn't an ideal solution to wildfires in California. Extensive research has shown that increasing logging isn't the answer; places that are heavily logged actually have worse wildfires in many cases. And I think we all understand that raking the forest isn't going to help.:rolleyes: The fact is that California was born to burn. The climate is really conducive to fire and climate change will just make it worse. I think the single biggest problem is the current trend of having homes built all the way into the forest. Yeah, it's nice to walk out your sliding back door and sit by your pool and watch the deer feeding in your yard. But when the inevitable fires come sweeping through you're SOL.

    One of my best friends lives a ways out of Missoula, Montana, up in the mountains. He's a hardcore prepper but also an EMT and experienced woodland firefighter. A couple summers back the fires came close to his place and he elected to dig in and fight. In his case it probably wasn't entirely foolhardy as he has a large water supply, a lot of gear and lots of experience. Still you can only do so much.
     
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  5. lopie

    lopie Scout

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    if he's a firefighter, he probably already cleared all the fuel away from his house 30-50 feet out? I'd think the bigger problem -- assuming you cleared all fuel away from your house -- is air quality.

    Some online preppers over the years give us suburban folks a hard time saying that we need to leave the city areas, but massive out of control fires are way less common here than in the woods.
     
  6. Midwest.Bushlore

    Midwest.Bushlore Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Air quality would be in issue but he has a basement and a fairly good supply of O2 in tanks. Also some N100 masks.
     
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  7. Uncle Duke 520

    Uncle Duke 520 Scout

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    The stress and shock will cause a lot of people to just give up and die.
    Others, perhaps stronger mentally, will rise to the occasion and do well considering the circumstances...
    Then Cholera and Dysentery show up to the party and poison the punch..
    Gotta watch those Goth girls ! Lol.
     
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  8. caoutdoorsman

    caoutdoorsman Scout

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    I survived the fire as well, I had a suitcase and my work pack ready to go in case of a fire, I spent more time warning neighbors than I did packing (only took a few minutes to throw the packs in my truck, already had a couple cases of water in the truck for work).

    You really don't need all that much to survive, mobility and physical fitness is far more important than bringing lots of stuff with you.

    I think its a very American/Western mentality; we're convinced we need to buy/possess lots of different apparel and accessories for different endeavors (sports, fitness, hobbies, camping, preparedness, marksmanship, etc...).

    The people who made it out fastest were the guys on Harleys and dirt-bikes, they were able to cruise right past all of us who were stuck in traffic by splitting lanes.

    "Where there's smoke, there's fire..." - If something seems like its going to happen, warn people and GTFO.
     
  9. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    On a mandatory evacuation I had to rebuild a universal joint on the car before we could go any where along with all the other preparations for leaving indefinitely .
    Yes I said rebuild not replace as all the stores were closed in town and I used other rollers from other bearings to rebuild what I had . it worked till I sold the car years later.
    We were fortunate that the fire was extinguished long before it reached our town .
    but I know that is not always going to be the case .
    The problem is most towns and counties and states are behind the Agenda 21, If you don't know what that is you should ,
    It is not a conspiracy it is the plan for the future of America and the rest of the world for that matter and is openly publicized.
    Burning out certain remote places is going to be the norm ,getting people out of the woods and into cities where they can be controlled.
    Politically both sides are both for a and against it, but those for it, it seems are assuming it is not going to effect them personally .
    Problem is bugging out may not be possible ,so far as hiding in the woods indefinitely .
    And in practical terms , during the 1929 crash most of the wild life disappeared and some went extinct especially deer .
    So both having animals you water and feed on and feed for those animals is critical.
    I have preparations for fighting fire on my property and defending my land . I am well above a flood zone unless the oceans rise over a thousand feet.
    I may not survive , but at least I have preparations for some one to survive for a while .
     
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