Thoughts after July 4th fireworks.

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by urazmusbdragn2, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. urazmusbdragn2

    urazmusbdragn2 Scout

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    Brought some friends out to see the local fireworks exhibition which has been done most years for the past 110. They did a great job, almost never ending for the duration with a lot of LOUD ones to boot!

    Getting out of the large parking area with one way out and people directing traffic made for an interesting thought. Large number of folks going in one direction, out, with 100's of vehicles via a 2 lane drive, 200 yds long. Some sat and waited, others did what they could to get in front of or blow past those directing traffic. Last were the few, laying on the horn, screaming for people to move even though it was readily seen nothing was going their way.

    All of this after waiting about 15-20 minutes! What would they do when roads are in such a state as this and you've not moved for 8 or 10 hours? How would they react to someone telling them to wait until XXX? They've been running the car the whole time to keep the A/C going, have now run out of fuel and are ready to start a fight because they're part to blame for blocking the way and don't want to see their ride pushed off the road to the side because f it.

    In general I prefer to get a place where leaving fairly quickly and without headaches is more important than a front row seat, especially where things can be seen well for a distance. I just wanted to accommodate those who were there for the show, I think they might have learned a little from the experience on the ride home discussion.
     
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  2. PMSteve

    PMSteve Old Timey Outdoorsman Supporter

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    Not for a fireworks display, but attending a baseball game at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles years ago.

    Whenever my family would go to a night game, Mom would pack sandwiches, chips, drinks & etc, put it in a big ice chest. Once we'd arrive at the ballpark, it would get locked in the station wagon (it's an old style of car, similar to an old fashioned SUV), then we'd go watch the game.

    Afterwards, we'd return to the car and have a little tailgate party, eating the food we'd packed, all the while watching the traffic jam as everyone tried getting to the exits before everyone else. If you've ever been to a Dodger home game, you'll know that about 60% of the crowd begin leaving by the seventh inning in order to beat the rush, which results in a pre rush rush that's just as bad as the post game rush.

    Dodger fans are weird. Most show up at the ballpark by the third inning, only to leave by the seventh. Go figure!?

    Steve
     
  3. urazmusbdragn2

    urazmusbdragn2 Scout

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    I've done the leave before the finale a few times myself, usually better than staying thru the end. We had some stuff to munch on for the show as well as water and snapple drinks for the excursion.

    The thoughts running thru my mind were more on a what if? scenario started, people loosing it over relatively minor issues. Any major evacuation and having to leave by road, as most would.
     
  4. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    In a peaceful situation like you describe.

    Option #1.
    Leave before it's over. Miss a bit, but beat the rush.

    Option #2.
    Leave later after the bulk of the honking, swearing, & flipping off has subsided.
    You'll be more relaxed, and really no further behind than if you sat in the traffic.

    Option #3.
    Research better, lesser known exit routes. Walk a little further to leave you vehicle outside the "Zone of Madness"

    Option #4.
    My personal favorite.
    Avoid crowded places.



    In a higher stress, SHTF type scenario. It's anybody's guess.

    Obviously;

    Option #1.
    Again, get out early. But that option may not exist.

    Option #2
    Leave later, may or may not exist.
    Sitting duck scenario.

    Option #3.
    Research better known lesser traveled routes. Stash Vehicle outside ZOM.

    Option #4.
    Rules the day.
    Avoid crowds.
    Don't be there in the first place.


    One last Observation;
    You are not stuck in traffic.
    "You ARE traffic"
     
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  5. blind & lost

    blind & lost Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    @PMSteve your explanation of what a station wagon was brought a smile to my face... The first time at Talladega and Daytona (NASCAR) races with over 100,000 people, exiting was the pits (pun intended). Lessons learned, figured out where to park after that. If it's a hurricane, I-75 will be jammed, bugging in as usual.
     
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  6. Mikewood

    Mikewood Supporter Supporter

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    Last time we went to our towns display they ended at 9:30 and we hit the street at 11:00. Much the same honking and all and surrounded by drunks. I would rather stay home or enjoy the father in law and family light up a private show. But then family events are always better.

    That reminds me I need to miss another family get together because of work or maybe just this time miss some work...
     
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  7. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    I have never read/heard of one, but I always thought in the back of my mind, that 4th of July in general would be a good time for a terrorist event. I also don't attend large public displays, so it's not been a worry.
     
  8. VtBlackDog

    VtBlackDog Supporter Supporter

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    I park outside the zone and bike in...
     
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  9. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    LOL. I live at the rural end of a two lane hwy. You drive an hour before you find a stop light. There are 3 passing lanes before that light. No matter how many cars pass you. You will be on their bumper at the light.
    As a child I was in the back seat in a line up. The guy three cars back was leaning on the horn and shouting obscenities. My father calmly got out. Walked back and asked. "You must be tired by now? How about I sit back here, blow on the horn and bitch. You can can go explain the kids why I'm behaving so badly!" ROFL
    Cheers Jim
     
  10. dads2vette

    dads2vette Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    If I know I'm going to be at a crowded venue we always waited to miss the throng of angry "gottaleavenow" types. After sporting events we'd start the grill up(again) and have a nice relaxing meal...even after December football games in Orchard Park(Buffalo Bills). taught my kids the same thing. After fireworks at Epcot or any other park we'd grab some ice cream and meander around a near empty park until we could walk out and get right on a bus/car. Easy peasy.

    Not a huge fan of crowds but I don't avoid them either. I'd miss a lot of things I enjoy if I started skipping things because of "what if" situations.

    dave
     
  11. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    @PMSteve I have a 1961 Ford Country Squire station wagon, my grandpa bought new. About 80k miles the first time around {ATTENTION JAY LENO?} The seats have covers on them from the dealer. Garaged since new, it's straight and solid. I hope to get it going again. The rubber floor mats are crumbling, the car has zero rust. It won't take much, just some time and elbow grease.

    This is not mine, but it looks like this. Tiny stubby tail fins, coming off of the 50's.....

    [​IMG]

    Sorry to derail the July 4 thread. I should move to the Transportation thread.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
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  12. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    I absolutely love that "Station Wagon" is being discussed and illustrated

    For brain fodder I will Toss out the "Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser"
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oldsmobile_Vista_Cruiser

    I spent time in several iterations of this beast.
    The carbureted version could be viewed as a viable survival vehicle. Not perfect, but doable. Posi rear end, storage and sleep room.

    Cut half the roof off and add Ma Deuce for Madd Max scenarios.
     
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  13. Jean

    Jean Guide

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    Just in a line ... not that long, someone got cranky, tore up the shoulder, until the unmarked state trooper pulled in front of him. He was still sitting there when I inched past.
     
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  14. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I often laugh when I go to the movies, and it seems he flick is ended but lo and behold there is a teaser just after the credits.
    Not for the teaser but just to avoid the rush I let the bulk of the crowd leave and then I can take my time .
    As for fire works ,I just as soon watch them at a distance . Good sense is far less frustrating then dealing with,,,,,,,,,,,, well you know .
     
  15. bosque bob

    bosque bob Scout

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    "One last Observation;
    You are not stuck in traffic.
    "You ARE traffic"."

    LOL. Very good observation.

    I avoid crowds. Well, actually, I avoid people in general.
     
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  16. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    When we go to town for the fireworks, we ride our wheelers there. Our spot is just off the trail. No traffic jams there, though we did have to wait a few minutes to cross a road because of the traffic.
     
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  17. ManyHammers

    ManyHammers Supporter Supporter

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    This is what we do,kick back and wait.

    When our boat docked in Mayport after our cruise I walked around the boat and then sat in the shop waiting for everyone to get off,standing in line with a seabag sucks!
     
  18. svh

    svh Supporter Supporter

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    I am blessed as my community puts on it's show(s) off of the dam on my lake. We get to lounge in the pontoon boat for the displays. Sometimes there is in excess of 20 boats, but there is always a jam up, albeit a short one, and I can be back at my dock within minutes ..... :)

    I am already at my SHTF location.
     
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  19. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I always watch events where crowds are common, or events where people do stupid things like the last Super Bowl where the winning city had a riot, the King Riots, even the civil rights riots of the 60’s, other manmade and natural disasters specifically to learn from them. How do people react, how does crowd control work, what were common problems weapons, what did the police and other government agencies do etc. There is no guarantee this is how people will react every time, but it is the closest thing to practice as I believe one can get.
     
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  20. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    I think @werewolf won makes some very good points.

    You never know when a situation will escalate.

    One minute you're in traffic heading home, the next it can turn into this.
    https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article214554250.html

    You can gain a lot of knowledge in any situation, good or bad. By being there, but just slightly removed. Like watching from a hilltop, back a bit from the fray. It's hard to get the big picture when you are in the trenches, just trying not to get your head shot off or bashed in.


    I'm not sure anyone really knows what makes an incident go from tense but calm, to a full fledged ungluing.

    But history is rife with them.
    A trucker stopped in traffic, became the Rodney King Riots.

    A college protest became the Kent State Shootings.

    A stand off in a field became the American Revolution.

    It pays to be aware of your surroundings.

    It isn't always anger or political upheaval that causes these moments in time either. A few years back a mob trampled a security guard to death in front of a Best Buy to get a good deel on flat screen televisions.

    Mob mentality is a very real and scary phenomena.
    It is the human version of a tornado. It seemingly comes out of nowhere, unleashes its destructive force and is gone just as quick. But like a tornado those caught up by it will never forget it. While those just a short distance away may never even know it occurred.

    In today's cell phone driven world. The new mob has command and control options they never had before. When those in control shut down the cell phone towers to take out that command and control option. Your cell phone and ability to communicate will go down with the rest. Bear that in mind.

    It pays to always be awae of your surroundings. Know the exits, know the traffic patterns, have a back up plan.

    One simple thing I always do and have harped on for years, is to always keep your gas tank above half full. More gas means more options in an emergency. More options is always a good thing in my opinion.
     
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  21. Ryan Alexander

    Ryan Alexander Tracker

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    4 wheel drive, big engine, big tires and don't forget the push bumper. tie down a couple jerry cans of fuel in the back and you'll be ok. Relax, if you really want to get out just move the guy in front of you and pull off the road.
     
  22. A K Church

    A K Church Guide

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    Slightly notorious incident. I was there.

    Independence Day 2012. San Diego harbor. Annual municipal fireworks show. Contractor had a computer glitch, managed to set off all hour+ of fireworks at the same time. For about 2 minutes, night was day...then nothing. It took people a little time to figure out is was all over, and then some were surly. The show they didn't have to pay for disappointed them.

    It was a long time getting out of the viewing area, and you heard a lot of honking, yelling, and raised middle fingers. I was darned glad to get out of Harbortown.
     
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  23. Pinelogcreek

    Pinelogcreek Supporter Supporter

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    If I can’t have option one which is avoidance then I prefer to wait. Last time we went to Talladega we went back to the camper after the race, cooked a good dinner and ate. The we hooked up and left, very little traffic and no drama.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018 at 7:33 AM
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  24. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

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    As a volunteer firefighter I had to attend the fireworks show in my little town (Glenwood, NM). It's a really big show, for such a small place. I don't know where the money comes from for all the fireworks, but some local guys do the pyro work and it's really first class. One big worry is wildfires. It's usually really hot and dry around the 4th of July and nobody in their right mind would be shooting off fireworks here. In fact there are bans on open burning or doing your own fireworks. They set it all up in the baseball field at the town park, and hundreds of people show up, park wherever they can, walk around visiting, eating, there's a band playing music, kids running everywhere, everybody waiting for it to get dark enough. Then about 6 of us firefighters scatter around the outside of the baseball field fence, with shovels, and wait for the show to start. We have a couple of fire trucks ready nearby, but we've never needed anything but shovels. When the fireworks start it's pretty spectacular, with all the colorful explosions overhead. I'm out there in the dark with my shovel watching for any still-burning embers to land in the dry weeds and grass, but none do. The fireworks they use are really well designed and made because all the burning material dies out at least 20 or 30 feet above the ground. Inside the baseball field the pyro guys are running around setting things off and there are some hot embers from the fuses, but the grass is short and so there isn't much to burn, and those guys grab a shovel and put out anything that starts inside the field. So we had a great fireworks show and no fires to put out. There was one cop attending the show, but he was just there with his family and not even in uniform. No trouble, no fires, just fun.

    upload_2018-7-18_20-55-27.jpeg
     

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