Tomato plant fell over

Discussion in 'Homesteading' started by highlander, Jul 10, 2019.

  1. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum

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    My bucket tomatoes are thriving. This heat has me watering heavily during the evening. Tonight I came home and noticed that one of my Roma plants had fallen over. I suspect because of the heat and number of tomatoes about 10 so far with plenty more blooms. I picked a few of the larger green ones off to take some of the weight off the plant. I’ve staked them and tied them off since they’ve began to produce.
    The main stalk had crimped above the bottom few branches, but was not broken or cracked in any way. I carefully straightened it out, added a few more ties around the main stalk, gave a generous amount of water, and a little high nitrogen fertilizer. Is it a good possibility that my plant will survive?
    I’m not new to this stuff, but I’m a bit out of practice. This is the first year in a long time that I’ve grown anything.
    Tomorrow I plan to add some more stakes and better support as some of my plants have outgrown the original stakes.
     
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  2. schapm

    schapm Elitist Inflated Ego LB42 Supporter

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    It could go either way. My daughter has a green thumb and a lady at the Farmers Market gave her a tomato plant that had bent over like that to see if she could revive it. She staked it and it seems to be doing fine three weeks later. Cages are also a good idea for big productive plants.
     
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  3. AdamD1776

    AdamD1776 Scout

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    As mentioned, cages are your friend. As for saving the plant, it could go either way, depends on how much damage it took. I would just go for it, and hope for the best. Make sure to save seeds from the tomatoes you did get!
     
  4. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum

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    I may build some kinda trellis for this one. I have two plants in one container, and they’re both loaded. I hope that with the heat and humidity it doesn’t go into shock. I’ve been battling that too. I’ve pruned back a few of the lower branches on my bigger plants.
     
  5. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum

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    I had one pepper plant, a Mad Hatter, that had been bent or broken at the nursery. It grew back crooked, almost like a shepherd’s crook, so I had to compensate for that when I staked it. They’re over 3 feet tall now and loaded with peppers.
     
  6. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Most tomatoes are vine plants. Give them something to climb and crawl on. :dblthumb:
     
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  7. Crusher0032

    Crusher0032 Appalachian Arthfael LB-42 Supporter

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    I've had tomato plants actually snap and then splinted like a broken bone that managed to hang on through the season, I'd say you're probably going to be alright. Just do some creative staking and enjoy your 'maters
     
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  8. Ragman

    Ragman Supporter Supporter

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    My parents have been growing tomatoes for decades and they stake all of them.
     
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  9. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum

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    I made some makeshift trellises and did some creative staking today.
    Everything seems alright.
     
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  10. bwallenjr

    bwallenjr Tracker

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    If the crimp is close to the soil heap dirt over it. Tomatoes are a vine if you bury part of the stalk it will put off roots. I have had many plants damaged some partially broken from a variety of reasons...me being a big cause. This trick has saved a good 70 to 80% of damaged tomatoes plants.. Also if I may. You may want to switch your watering from daily to a really heavy drenching once every 5 or so days..tomatoes like a consistent watering with good intervals. Closer to daily watering sometimes ends up in blossom end rot. Just some thoughts hope your plants make it.
     
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  11. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum

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    Thank you. So far the crimp has not had any negative effects on the plant. I did heap some more topsoil on the plants and mulched with dry grass. No straw was available, and I mowed 5 days ago. The clippings have been baking in the sun. The extra 4” layer of grass in the containers should help the soil moisture. This should cut my watering times and amounts down significantly.
    It’s supposed to rain this week a few days.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  12. bgf

    bgf Scout

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    It will be fine as long as it is mostly intact on the outer part, where the "veins"(?) are. Stakes are best for tomatoes pruned to a single stem. As a kid I worked For a tomato farmer who would stake plants about a foot apart and prune to single stem. They would grow up 8+ ft. high and he would regularly trim and tie.

    For a bushier plant cages are preferable, though mine always outgrow whatever cage I put them in... For romas (usually determinate) in a bucket, small cage would be fine maybe in addition to a stake. Sprawling works in the field, but there's a bit of loss, especially with larger indeterminate plants.

    I once broke a nice tomato plant off at the ground by accident. I stuck in a hole and wet it down good, and it wasn't even delayed more than a day or two.
     
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  13. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    Wish I had a picture of my buddy’s tomato cages. #8 (1”) rebar! Welded.
    Wonder if he has the Mrs. pack those out each season??
     
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  14. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum

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    Two days and no changes. I think it’ll pull through.
     
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  15. Bryan King

    Bryan King Supporter Supporter

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    I had to stake mine right after planting, they grew unbelievable fast. I pulled sucker leafs off . I've been getting huge tomatoes off of them. My wife wanted some Cherokee Purple and they taste great, low acid, sweet. Look them up very nice history on them.
     
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  16. TWill

    TWill Guide

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    I had a couple of suckers that got some size before I snapped them off so I poked a hole in the soil and tucked them in. A day later they were standing up nice and fresh ready to make their own tomatoes just like their momma does. These are container grown in the large recycling box bins the trash haulers used to use around here then they changed over to the larger upright rolling bins and these started showing up for cheap or free. To use them you can line the bottom with old leaves or landscape fabric and fill them up with compost, manure and potting soil. They weigh about 120-150lbs depending on how wet they are so one tomato plant in each and they don't blow over.
     
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  17. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Tomatoes are pretty hard to kill. We had some given to us by a plant seller because they looked so rough. We planted them with our sunflowers because we didn't think they would make it, they are doing fine. :)
     
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