Tourniquet Pass Around *WARNING GRAPHIC*

Discussion in 'Bush Medicine' started by Medic17, Dec 11, 2016.

  1. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    [​IMG]


    I am looking to start a Pass Around to let the members here evaluate different commercially available tourniquets and share their experiences.

    CAT (Gen 7)
    SOFT-W
    TK4-L
    SWAT-T (Ill provide 2 for this one incase it breaks.)
    RATS

    I will get a list going.

    -You only have to be a contributing member of the forum.
    NO MEDICAL TRAINING NECESSARY. I am looking to post out layman's experiences as well.


    -If you would like to participate you will have to agree to share your thoughts and experiences in a post on the provided tourniquets.

    You should examine the following criteria:
    Ease of Storage
    Ease of Use One Handed - Self Application Arm / Leg
    Ease of Use on a victim.
    Durability Impressions
    You should have a preference on one or two. State why you liked the ones you did and the ones you did not. Anything else you would like to share.

    -You will have to seek out how to properly apply each specific tourniquet. There are numerous sources on this. I will post links.

    -You can keep them for a week or so. Ill ship the first one and you will have to pay to ship them to the next evaluator via USPS Small Flat Rate Box. The last evaluator will send them back to me.

    If you would like to participate just state it below.

    Addresses will be provide via PM.


    1. @bowitis
    2. @T. Pollock
    3. @Subdood
    4. @Scratchthejeepguy
    5. @crewhead05
    6. @MT_Fin
    7. @Ol Grizz
    8. @andy.t
    9. @Bitterroot Native

    10. @NJHeart2Heart
    11. @TX_redneck
    12. @Pastor Chris
    13. @Jasonacraft
    14. @Odinborn

    Lets make this a great group learning opportunity!
    M17
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2017
  2. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    Reserved for Instructional Links.

    RATS


    CAT Tourniquet Instructional Videos
    CAT Resources

    SOF-T Wide


    TK-4


    SWAT-T
    SWAT-T™ - Stretch Wrap And Tuck Tourniquet - Videos


    The Resources are from Manufactures on Their Own Products.
    There are videos out there which may be better but this is how the manufacture wishes you to use their product. Feel free to search other sources on your own.

    Tourniquet Expiration - UPDATE

    I contacted the manufactures of the mentioned tourniquets and here is what they stated about expiration dates and temperature extremes on their products.

    In general, all agreed that they should be kept from UV exposure and the heat of a vehicle should not effect the performance. Do not train with the actual tourniquet that you will be using for life safety, keep your life safety tourniquet single use only.

    SWAT-T
    The expiration date was listed with the intent of the tourniquet being constantly exposed to the extremes. It should be kept in the wrapper until ready to be used. The wrapper prevents UV exposure, eases deployment, and keeps grit and contaminates of the tourniquet. It also assures the tourniquet that you are using is "fresh".

    SOFT-Wide
    They stated that their product was made for the military, it can handle the extremes and does not expire. (They were pretty blunt and almost scoffed at the question.)

    RATS
    There is no determined date of expiration. "Made from vulcanized rubber, it can handle the heat." It should be routinely inspected.
    It should be stretched to ensure elasticity. The outer nylon cover to the rubber should be free from frays. If frays or loss of elasticity is noticed, replace it.

    CAT
    The tourniquet does not expire. It is not effected by the temperature of a vehicle.
    It should be inspected, and if in question, it should be replaced. A unofficial replacement suggestion was to replace the tourniquet with the generation updates. The updates were calculated to ensure maximum efficiency and only done when when the new design proved vastly superior. The rep also commented it was a good idea to replace the tourniquet regularly if it was routinely exposed on the outside (of a vest or duty belt for example). While he could not officially comment on a time frame, he agreed yearly was a good conservative replacement plan.

    TK4-L
    It does not expire. Not effected by the heat of a vehicle. The tourniquet should be kept in the original wrapper, if the vacuum package is intact, its should be good to go. IF it is not kept in the original packaging it should be inspected to ensure elasticity and discarded if frays are noted.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
  3. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    I would love to participate, but I have zero knowledge on the subject.
     
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  4. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    Same here, I likely would not be a good candidate cause I have "0" knowledge about these or their use. Thank you medic for your generosity though and I'll be following the post to hopefully learn.
     
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  5. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    Well you are in if you want to take some initiative.
    Good Learning Opportunity.
    If there is enough interest there is no reason only six should be in.
    We will keep it going.
     
  6. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    Thank you very much!
    With some direction, I will jump in with both feet.
     
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  7. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    Thank you Sir! I will give it my best and hope to learn much.

    ETA: Thank you for this great opportunity and instruction!
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2016
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  8. Gruntinhusaybah

    Gruntinhusaybah Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Don't be shy guys, this is the perfect opportunity to expose yourself to tourniquets.
     
  9. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    I hope this is not a stupid question, But what do I need to do to accomplish this?

    " You only have to be a contributing member of the medical sub forum "

    Thanks again for the opportunity!
     
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  10. mtngoat

    mtngoat Scout

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    I would be happy to get in on this, took Ditch Medicine and we used and practiced with all kinds of tourniquets.
     
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  11. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    I am not sure I understand your question either.

    I know of you, you post here, I think you would be a good person to get in on the Pass Along and contribute your experiences.

    Ill contact you in a bit for your contact info.
    Ill send the tourniquets out to you.
    Watch the videos that I linked to.
    Seek out some additional internet resources for increased knowledge.
    When you get the tourniquets, play around with them. Get comfortable and familiar with them.
    Follow the instruction.
    You should start forming an experience and opinion.
    Share that in a specific thread.
    In a week or so send them off to the next guy. (PM Them for their contact info.) Use the list I am generating above in order to keep it easy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2016
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  12. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    Thanks, I definitely want to participate more in the medical sub forum.
     
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  13. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    Just shoot me a PM after you've done your evaluation of them bro and I'll send ya my address.
     
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  14. Subdood

    Subdood Ex-bubblehead Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I would like to ve part of this if I may? I have had basic FA, Adult CPR, AED etc.but nothing on tourniquets. Been wanting to learn and I am sidlined from major things for a bit while I heal up. Thanks Medi17!
     
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  15. AK Eric

    AK Eric Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    This is a great idea for a pass around! I've only had training and first hand experience on the windlass type tq's. I was just watching the attached video sections and see how each item would be quite beneficial. Though the swat-t videos were more entertaining, I think I may actually supplement my kit with one if for nothing more than to be an excellent compression bandage supplement. I believe just looking at it would allow to make a dressing weatherproof/dry until further care is available. Also, the application to those with small limbs, the swat-t seems to be ideal.
    Since my formal tq training, I always have at least one on me at work and when out playing with my sharps.
    I will be following this thread to see what people come up with and impressions they develop.

    Thanks for taking the time to do this.
     
  16. Scratchthejeepguy

    Scratchthejeepguy Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    I'm clumsy...
    I like to play with guns and knives...
    I don't have good depth perception...
    I should know how to apply a tourniquet. I don't think my experience with a bandaid is good enough.

    Let me know if I can get on the list.
     
  17. crewhead05

    crewhead05 Supporter Supporter

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    Ive never done a pass around before, but id like to do this one. Add me to the list, and thank you!
     
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  18. MT_Fin

    MT_Fin Axe'aholic Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    definitely in, thanks man!
     
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  19. BillyBogota

    BillyBogota Functional Weirdo Bushcraft Friend

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    After a gracious invite by @Medic17 , I've got all these TQ's available so I'm going to do a follow-along and post my results, that way I don't hold up the pass-around for the rest of you guys.
     
  20. Ol Grizz

    Ol Grizz Scout

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    @Medic17 Please add me to the pass around list. Thank you for the learning opportunity.
     
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  21. Tangotag

    Tangotag Field Gear Junkie Supporter Bushclass I

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    Very interesting, I have no experience with tourniquets but had been looking at the SWAT-T as an additional resource to assist with a compression bandage. I'm very interested in seeing how this thread goes.
     
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  22. Gruntinhusaybah

    Gruntinhusaybah Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Sign up and get some exposure!
     
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  23. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    @bowitis
    Package Inbound. You should receive it on the 15th.
     
  24. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    Tourniquets come up semi-regularly on another place I visit some. Seems common for a number of the guys to daily carry them, some in ankle carry rigs, some are also lE and have used them a number of times. This may be of some interest. Its only one of a number of search results when I looked a minute ago, if its of interest, doing your own search there my be productive, but I recall they were talking of actual uses and differences, and how to use them on yourself and others under field conditions. Voodoo_man has used them for work several times. I think he ended up not getting a complete flow stoppage on the first one and used another just above to slow or stop the flow enough.

    pistol-forum.com
     
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  25. andy.t

    andy.t Guide Vendor

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    I'd like to participate!
     
  26. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    Got it! I will try to be done and pass along by Monday.
    Thanks again!
     
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  27. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    I'm really interested in trying this, even though it makes me a bit nervous - but maybe that's a good reason to try them- to make myself more comfortable God forbid I ever need to use one!

    If this is still open, I'd like to get on the list.
    Dawn
     
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  28. BillyBogota

    BillyBogota Functional Weirdo Bushcraft Friend

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    Just got my TK-4L's in -- finals week is now over, so I'm hoping to get this done this weekend or early next week.
     
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  29. TN_Woodman

    TN_Woodman Scout

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    Thanks for this pass around @Medic17. This will be very interesting.

    @T. Pollock I have had training with the SOFT-T and CAT, which I own along with the TK-4. Holler at me when you get them in and I can show you what I know if you want.

    I like the CAT the best, the original SOFT I have is too narrow. I carry the TK-4 in my FAK when in the woods because its smaller.
     
  30. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'll go ahead and PM you my address bud for whenever you get ready to send them.

    LOL I was sure hoping I'd be able to get your assistance and guidance, thanks brother!
     
  31. crewhead05

    crewhead05 Supporter Supporter

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    I read this today. Seemed applicable. What are your thoughts M17.

    Buyer Beware: Selecting Your Everyday Carry Tourniquet


    I was notified the link is dead on this. Here is original text.

    With the increase in Active Violent Incidents (AVIs) over the last few years and the shared lessons learned (LL) from the U.S. and Canadian militaries’ experience in Afghanistan and Iraq, there has been an explosion of life-saving devices hitting the market. Nothing has become a larger issue than hemorrhage control. Hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death in both the civilian and military setting. It also happens to be one of the easiest to treat.

    Private Military Contractor during the rescue operation
    The extremity tourniquet saves lives.
    Manual pressure has been shown to be as quick and effective in a manikin model for junctional hemorrhage as several commercially available products that are currently being used by the U.S. Army.1 However, it is the resurgence of the extremity tourniquet (TQ) that has saved thousands of lives.

    The Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) has thoroughly studied and approved of three TQs for use in combat, 1) the Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T) (North American Rescue, Greer, SC), 2) the SOF Tactical-Tourniquet Wide (SOF®TT-W) (Tactical Medical Solutions, Anderson, SC), and 3) the Emergency and Military Tourniquet (EMT) (Delphi Medical Innovations, Vancouver, BC). Their civilian counterpart the Committee on Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC) follows similar guidelines.

    In response to AVIs, groups and initiatives like the Hartford Consensus, Stop The Bleed, and C-TECC have called for more bystanders training in hemorrhage control.2 Many of these are successful and are being taught using similar if not the same TQs recommended by the CoTCCC and C-TECC. However, there is still an overall lack of uniform guidelines for TQ application3, which may be cause for inadequate TQs being used throughout the country.

    There are several commercially available TQs being sold that do not have scientific data to support its effectiveness or are being marketed in a manner that has the appearance of being recommended by such groups as the CoTCCC. Still others promote the use of improvised TQs.

    Some articles support the use of improvised TQs, when they are properly applied.4,5 Though, other data suggest that improvised TQs are not nearly effective as commercially available TQs.4,6 This may be for any number of reasons. A vital reason is the inverse relationship between the TQ width and the pressure needed to stop arterial bleeding.

    Many improvised TQs and other commercially available TQs simply do not have the ability to stop the arterial hemorrhage due to this width/pressure relationship. Pneumatic tubing or other elastic/rubber material was a popular TQ in World War II and can be effective.

    Nevertheless, data suggests that they inadequately occlude arterial bleeding and only stop venous bleeding, both of which can worsen hemorrhage.7 They can also be extremely painful and pressure difficulties can result in excessive pressure.8 In the event a novice applies a rubber TQ, will they be able to apply it in concentric wraps to ensure there is adequate pressure to stop arterial bleeding?

    More recent anecdotal data from the Boston bombing found that that six of the rubber and improvised type TQs had to be replaced with CATs.9 Furthermore, the most common EMS tourniquet consisted of rubber tubing and a Kelly clamp.9

    The idea of one-handed tourniquets are often marketed as a simple solution in the case you have one healthy extremity. Again, data suggests, it is difficult to employ with varying degrees of success in stopping arterial blood flow.10,11 Finally, the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma, recommended against “use of narrow, elastic, or bungee-type devices.”7

    Medical endorsements of a product are not equivalent to scientific evidence of its effectiveness and can often be misleading for the bystander or novice.

    It must be understood that, first and foremost, tactical medicine is medicine. This means it is governed by conventional practice for implementing the employment of new equipment. The standard of care in modern medicine is built on a foundation of good evidence and scientific analysis.

    This is called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). In the broad strokes, a new medicine, medical device or technique must be tested in a research or laboratory setting before being used on actual patients or casualties. If an acceptable level of efficacy can be established in these controlled settings then patient trials are attempted to gather data in real world applications. This data is analyzed, collated and studied to examine the success or failure of the drug, device, technology or technique.

    If all goes as planned a new standard of care is accepted by the medical community. If there is no improvement over the existing standard of care, then the idea is usually shelved until some innovation takes place. If there is a lack of positive outcomes than the existing treatments, then the findings are published as a warning to the industry.

    Medical professionals used EBM to compliment clinical judgment and common sense. Tactical medicine is no different. Tactical operations require a tiered medical response centered on matching an appropriate intervention to the level of threat and gear available. The CoTCCC and C-TECC guidelines are based in science to promote a high standard of care within this specific environment.

    Clinicians will not prescribe a new medication with a proper monogram to include understanding the possible side effects and adverse effects. The same goes for new technology and techniques. No medical professional would use an unproven medical device as part of his or her regular practice. The outcomes can be unpredictable. This could be considered malpractice and negligence. Again, there is no difference between tactical medicine and clinical medicine.

    So, what does this mean to the bystander or non-medic that wants to carry first-aid gear including a tourniquet on their person? Simple, your choices of medical devices (aka tourniquet) must be based on science and evidence; not dogmatic brand loyalty or slavish following of tactical fashion icons.

    Even with CoTCCC approved TQs, there are many instances where TQs are not applied correctly.12 Why would one believe non-TCCC recommended TQs could be applied correctly to stop arterial hemorrhage?

    Only recently, two non-TCCC TQs were evaluated against the CAT. The Rapid Application Tourniquet System (RATS) and the Tactical Mechanical Tourniquet (TMT) did not show any improvement over the CAT, and further, the RATS resulted in greater blood loss and slower application time when compared to the CAT.13 Both the RATS and TMT were able to stop arterial hemorrhage in the manikin model, but were inferior to the CAT. It should be noted that these evaluations were completed under controlled laboratory conditions.



    Would you want your paramedics or doctors working on your family to use a device that has questionable effect? Of course not.

    Would you go into battle with an unproven weapon? Not a chance. So, why would you carry an inferior tourniquet to use on yourself or your family?

    Why leave your decision in the life-saving equipment you carry to the judgment of a misleading brand ambassador or snazzy social media campaign? There is only one logical answer. Follow the evidence. Carry a proven tourniquet with proven results in combat and at home.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  32. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    That was a worthwhile article.


    Bleeding control on the upper thigh has always been the hard spot to occlude.
    Tourniquets with windlasses have been shown most effective.
    Notice I said "most" effective.
    I am not saying the rubber band type cannot stop a difficult bleeder on the upper leg,
    Nor am I saying a windlass type will stop one there every time as well.

    Truth of the matter is that any tourniquet improperly applied can cause harm.
    It is also has been demonstrated that commercial devices have proven to be superior to improvised ones.

    The "rubber tubing and a Kelly clamp" style tourniquet is generally the way extremity bleeding is controlled in the operating room. (Surgical Tubing not Penrose Tubing.)
    As far as the most common EMS tourniquet? Maybe in Boston at the time.

    ***The "tourniquets" used for blood draws will not be effective at stoping arterial bleeding. Thats why they are great for blood draws, they stop venus while allowing arterial flow thus causing the veins to engorge.***

    I know my colleagues and I have used taped on blood pressure cuffs long before the big push for tourniquets.

    Until the second gulf war the gold standard of teaching has always been an improvised one made from a triangular bandage and a windlass.

    I admit there are a bunch of commercially available tourniquets that I give the hairy eyeball to.

    Some commercial TQTs that may not have the grand endorsements from TCCC ACS and a few other fancy places but they have shown to work WHEN PROPERLY APPLIED.

    With that being said some have greater margins for error.
    IE More challenging to correctly apply.

    I think with a properly trained provider who knows the limitations of the device as well as recognize the dangers of a improperly placed device. The non windlass types can be effective.

    With that said, it has always been my preference to carry two different styles.

    If you could only have one TQT that had to have the highest percentage of success of stopping a difficult high leg bleed IMO it would be a CAT or a SOF-T.

    Not every bleed is a difficult high leg bleed.
    Not everyone has the storage space to store a windlass TQT.
    Some may not wish to spend $30 but be willing to spend $10 on a commercial product.
    Some may be trained better than others.

    The variables go on and on.

    The article does bring light to valid points.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
  33. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    Between snow storms & holiday traffic at the post office, the package is on its way to Tn.

    Feed back to follow.
     
  34. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    Received the tourniquets in the mail today so I'll start reviewing them tomorrow. Thanks again Medic17 for this opportunity!
     
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  35. xRangerx

    xRangerx Woods wandering bird nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    This is awesome!! A topic I've been curious about, following with interest!
     
  36. tomme boy

    tomme boy Scout

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    Had first hand experience with another type of tourniquet Thursday. I had to have trigger finger release surgery done on my left hand.

    I heard them say to apply the tourn mid forearm. So I had to let them let take a look at it before they covered me completely up.

    It is a pneumatic powered tourniquet. Boy when they pumped it up to completely shut off the blood, IT HURT! I was surprised at the amount it was turned up to. They said it was 250mmHg which converts to 4.8 PSI. Doesn't sound like a lot but it was. This looks like what they used.

    image2.jpg
     
  37. Subdood

    Subdood Ex-bubblehead Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Even at only 5 psi (roughly) if the contact area with you is smaller that multiplies the pressure exerted on that area. So the effective pressure applied to you can be much higher.
     
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  38. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    Just wanted to give a short update. @TN_Woodman came over today and was a huge help in showing me the proper use of the TQs, he's military trained with some of them. I want to experiment a little more with them before sharing my thoughts and then I'll get them sent on to @Subdood . Since I'm not great at putting things to words I asked him if he would also share his thoughts here on them.

    Thanks again for the help brother, I appreciate ya!!!

    Thank you again to @Medic17 as well for this great opportunity to review these!!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
  39. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    Awesome to hear @T. Pollock !
    @TN_Woodman Good On you for Passing on Knowledge!

    Your brain is one tool that you can't exactly forget at home.
     
  40. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    First, I must apologies for taking so long to do this follow up.

    Mike, Thanks for letting me participate in this PASS AROUND!
    It was extremely eye opening. I am very right handed dominant, so I tried to use the tourniquet on my upper right arm, applied with my left hand. It did not go as easily as I would have hoped. Long story short, the RATS worked the best for me under these conditions. I also used a similar o2 / pulse meter to one used in one of the videos. I did not get to use all of the equipment for as long as I would have liked to because of work, weather and holiday issues, and I was already late passing the package along.

    I watched a lot of YouTube on several of the items, from First responders to Military personnel.

    Bottom line is, as one of the videos stated, depending on the injury, 20-30 seconds might be all of the time available to get things under control if you're alone.
    I do a lot of archery hunting by myself, and every year I hear a story about a self inflicted broadhead accident. 30 seconds is not enough time to find the tourniquet and practice how to use it. It seams like my FAK is always "SOME WHERE" in my pack, because the worst wound that I have had to take care of is usually a blister from the wrong sock combination.
    Because of this pass around, I am building a better FAK and I'm giving it a designated spot in ALL of my back packs. I will never look around for it again. I will practice constantly and I have already signed up for first aid classes.

    Mike this is probably not what you had in mind, but it was priceless to me not to mention extremely eye opening, so again thank you very much.
     
  41. Subdood

    Subdood Ex-bubblehead Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Thanks for the info @bowitis. It is helpful to me at least. I generally keep a boo boo kit somewhere in an outer pocket. Been around firearms most of my adult life in some capacity but never really thought about a trauma kit until
    I had some work in Libya in 2013. No, I am not THAT kind of contractor. But nonetheless it brought home some things. Since that time I have kept a dedicated Trauma kit and generally keep it accessible when I'm on the range etc. But watching Alone Season 2 when the woman cut the crap out of her hand, another eye opener. I actually tried to get WFA training last year but it kept getting cancelled in my AO due to lack of interest and I didn't have the time to travel elsewhere. Maybe this year. Or I may reach out to a few Buddies who are Paramedics and see if I can arrange some private training etc. we shall see.

    Excited to get the opportunity to practice with a variety of tools. Then I can select one that best suits me and get a blue one to train with and one for field use only. (I do read your threads @Medic 17).
     
  42. bowitis

    bowitis Supporter Supporter

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    I guess I have lived my life with Rose colored glasses on. I am not a spring chicken anymore, I have raised kids, been hunting, pack backing, bike packing, mountain biking, etc... and have not had the need, luckily. "It always happens to the OTHER guy".
    I'm working on that attitude now.
     
  43. Subdood

    Subdood Ex-bubblehead Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    For most of my working life we had adequate medical and first responders. Used to be one, and had the requisite First Aid / CPR / AED training etc. But for activities outside work, I would have to say, a bit less prepared.
     
  44. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    We had a little issue with the RATS :) but I'll save that for my review.

    I have something else going subdood's way that should be done in another day or two (will send together) so the TQ's will be headed his way soon.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  45. TN_Woodman

    TN_Woodman Scout

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    I think most people keep their first aid/trauma kit with their bag.
    A couple years ago, I bought a TK-4 and started carrying it, a bandage, and a few small things always in my pocket. My medical kit stays in the bag.
    These are two different things.
    When I first went on a walk about with Tim, I told him that my FAK was in my right pocket. That way if I'm unconscious, he would know.
     
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  46. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    My uneducated and humble review/opinion of the TQ's

    Again a big thank you to Medic17 for this opportunity and to
    @TN_Woodman for the help and instruction with these!

    I can see advantages and disadvantages of most all of them. My two favorites however are the TK4-L and the CAT. The TK4-L to me was
    the easiest to self apply one handed, it packs the smallest, easiest to dual purpose as a pressure bandage and can be used on a child
    or adult either one. All these things would make the it my #1 pick.

    My second choice would be the CAT. Though it doesn't pack as small as the TK4-L it's still easy to fit in a small pouch. Second easiest
    to me to one handed self apply and the design makes it very easy to use.

    Third choice would be the SOF-T. I like the windless retainer on it better than I do the CAT but I don't like the buckle system. When it's
    unbuckled (like when you have to wrap around a limb that you can't lift to go over)it's much harder to fasten back than the CAT's single
    feed through design.

    Forth would be the SWAT-T. To me it is a little harder to get started one handed than the TK4-L. It's great that it could also be used as
    a pressure bandage but I still like the TK4-L better for that purpose.

    My least favorite was the RATS. From the moment I watched the instructional video I didn't like the narrow design of it. After getting
    and trying it out I still prefer the wider TQ's. I feel overall it's a poor design. The buckle (metal part) tends to dig in and is right
    in the way of the secondary wraps you need to make. Worst of all it got stuck on TN_Woodman and it took me forever to get it walked down off of his arm. I tried every way I knew to unfasten it but it would not come loose and I know that my walking the twisted (over each other) bands were hurting him as I pulled on each of them to walk it off his arm. I honestly was about ready to cut it off and buy a new one to put back in the pass around. We were both laughing so hard it was hard to do anything but at the same time it was a little scary.
    Here's a couple of photos of the band stuck in the buckle. No photos of while it was stuck on him and his arm was blue as I was in a bit of a hurry! LOL

    IMG_4780.JPG IMG_4781.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  47. TN_Woodman

    TN_Woodman Scout

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    My past experience with these TQs are:
    - CAT - I have about 10 years of training with the CAT, but never the generation 7. I really like the changes they made; stronger, less pinching, faster.
    - SOFT - I received an original SOFT while in Iraq in early 2006. They handed it to us and we had like a 5 minute class.
    - TK-4 - I wanted something smaller than my CAT so I would actually carry it in my pocket, so I order one a couple years ago.
    - SWAT and RATS - this was the first time for my to touch one.

    My thoughts:
    I pretty much agree with Tim on the TQs.

    I watched the videos, except the SOFT, I forgot to. I didn't know that the SOFT unclipped to run the strap around a limb and really didn't like having to unweave/ reweave the strap. That night after handling the TQs, I realized that I didn't watch that video, so I watched it. So, my option of the SOFT is limited because I didn't get to practice with it properly.
    I liked the SOFT. If unclipping and reclipping is easy, I would say it might be better than the CAT, but I am very familiar with the CAT. I've been trained to apply one anywhere under 10 seconds, so I'll stick with it.

    My TK-4 is the older model. I like the changes they made. The TK-4 is small, easy to learn and use, and multifunctional.

    The SWAT is the most comfortable. If I put together a kit for a group, I would put some in there. I think they are good for putting on others. My issues are the difficulty with one hand use. Pretty good though.

    With the RATS, I think there is a larger learning curve than the others. During practice, I had to play around with it quit a bit to get the use down. You really have watch to keep the wraps spaced and untwisted. This is not the TQ I want to have to use when fumbling in the dark in extreme pain. I know Tim put it on upside-down once, and I wrapped it the wrong way. If you look at the thumbnail, the green arrow is where the strap was stopping, but when the TQ got stuck on my arm, the strap had slipped unto the area where the blue arrow is. As Tim said, we almost cut it off. My fingers tips where blue when we got it off.
    rats-tourniquet-black.jpg

    I prefer to carry a TK-4 in my pocket, and will probably add my CAT to the medical kit in my pack.

    With any of them, practice, practice, practice.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2017
  48. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    You are 100% correct with this statement. They all have a goal but some perform better than others at that, and much of it is personal preference. I will keep my opinion last to avoid influencing future evaluations.

    Future Note
    My choice would be that you destroy a TQT to prevent bodily harm if you have one that gets stuck.
    Prolonged pain and discomfort is considered harm. Be safe.

    SIDE NOTE ON THE RATS.
    The tourniquet performed how it should. The space where it became "stuck" is a locking area so that it prevents slipping or becoming dislodged. If it becomes locked the easiest way to overcome this is snapping the ear. This will destroy the TQT but it will be undone rapidly.

    Snap the Ear
    The metal ear where the green arrow is pointing.
    Use your thumb and push lateral pressure against it. (against the flat side of the clip not spine ).
    It will bend and snap right off.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  49. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    In this picture it shows exactly how you would apply the pressure to snap the ear.
     
  50. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushclass I

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    Very good to know the ear is brittle enough to snap rather than bend. I don't think he was in pain other than when I was pulling on it trying to get it loose but I was very close to cutting it. Sapping the ear would definitely be a safer option.
     
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