Turkish Coffee seems apt for bushcrafting trips, anybody go this route?

Discussion in 'Cooking & Water Purification' started by GingerBeardMan, Aug 4, 2019.

  1. GingerBeardMan

    GingerBeardMan Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2019
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    448
    Location:
    Colorado
    I've found this technique makes a small amount of extremely tasty coffee, but more than that, extremely potent coffee. An Ex of mine had a Turkish father and would use this method on camping trips to make some of the tastiest coffee I've ever had.



    From what I understand, the chief difference between Turkish coffee and cowboy coffee is the grind is chalkdust fine. The little burr crank grinders they make for it are absolute works of art, see: 4149u1XSdDL._AC_SY400_.jpg

    Pretty much any pot you can hold on a stick is shoved into the fire till it is about to boil, is pulled back out, and you repeat this, giving a little stir, 3 times. then pour and enjoy.

    Youd probably want to pre grind your coffee before you head into the wilds to avoid carrying this little brass and copper chunk but I can only imagine how tightly packed this ultra fine powder could be. Pack it tight enough and no worries about oxidation either.

    Anybody but me do this?
     
    highlander, TWill, bacpacjac and 7 others like this.
  2. Big ian

    Big ian Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    2,336
    Location:
    BC Coast Mountains
  3. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    7,779
    Likes Received:
    38,761
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    What makes Turkish coffee more potent? Is it the coffee itself?
    I often see movie characters in Europe, even in The Godfather if I recall, drinking small cups of coffee. Is that Turkish coffee or is a European thing country by country? Is it the method of brewing?

    Jut from an efficiency basis I would love a small potent cup of coffee. Any time. I'd probably drink the whole thing and not set it down somewhere and forget about it.
     
  4. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2013
    Messages:
    12,906
    Likes Received:
    53,102
    Location:
    Kansas
    I have only had true Turkish coffee a couple of times and it was delicious.
    Watching the video I can’t think of a reason it wouldn’t be a viable option for the bush.
    Something to think about.
    Thanks
     
  5. GingerBeardMan

    GingerBeardMan Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2019
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    448
    Location:
    Colorado
    sew this guy knows Haha. hes not wrong about the grit. I always wash my mouth out after.

    I think it's the particulate size. Turkish coffee is thick and semi viscous, and you end up not just making the caffeine easily accessible to your gut, but also end up drinking quite a lot of the coffee bean particulate matter, and ingesting that as well. The only reason this doesnt work with French press is because it jams up the mesh. It's a lot like pressure free espresso if you make it right, without the accompanying bitterness.

    My suggestion is to actually grind it with a little salt, it cuts the bitterness nicely and helps counteract the diuretic action.
     
  6. Rich_S

    Rich_S Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2017
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    517
    As a huge espresso maker and drinker - espresso is not supposed to be bitter.
     
  7. GingerBeardMan

    GingerBeardMan Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2019
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    448
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ah, I see, apparently I have been drinking bad espresso! Learn something every day
     
  8. rurik

    rurik Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    Messages:
    274
    Likes Received:
    430
    Location:
    Canberra, Australia
    I drink Turkish Coffee regularly and I love it. Yes the coffee needs to be pulverised to make it settle out. If you make it right it isn’t gritty as all the coffee settles to the bottom.
     
  9. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    24
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    6,400
    Likes Received:
    48,071
    Location:
    On the farm and at the beach.
    At the end of the day, the type of coffee you use will determine a lot.
    Pure arabica? Some robusta? What percentage blend? What type of roast? And on and on.
    Coffee ends up being a very personal thing, suited to your tastes and preferences.
     
  10. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    24
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    6,400
    Likes Received:
    48,071
    Location:
    On the farm and at the beach.
    Espresso.
    It's just a short coffee. Bizarrely enough, it is much stronger tasting than a tall coffee, but actually contains less caffeine (in total, not by quantity).
    Also, and very important, because only a small amount of water passes through the grounds, only part of the bean is utilised.... the smoother, tastier part! The more water that is used, the more of the less desirable flavours will be brought out, usually necessitating the use of... milk.
     
  11. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    24
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    6,400
    Likes Received:
    48,071
    Location:
    On the farm and at the beach.
    An easy method for great coffee in the bush:
    1. Put a scoop of coffee in your cup.
    2. Pour boiling water into the cup.
    3. Stir for ten seconds, taking care that no grounds stick to the rim.
    4. Let it sit for several minutes.... the grounds will sink to the bottom of the cup, and stay there.
    5. Drink your coffee. Stop drinking just a little above the grounds.
    6. Rinse out the gunk.
    Edit: this is essentially identical coffee to what a French press makes, just without the "equipment ". Why it's not more common/popular, I just don't know.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  12. allfatherodin

    allfatherodin Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    158
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Greek/Turkish coffee is the same. Spent quite a while traveling in both countries and had my fill of that coffee. Wasn't a big fan. I like the grounds out of my coffee when I drink. Leaving a bit of stuff in the bottom rather than filtering it out initially isn't my style :p

    The one thing I did like is that you could go to even the smallest store, and they would have beans that they'd ground up fresh for you on the spot.
     
  13. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    24
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    6,400
    Likes Received:
    48,071
    Location:
    On the farm and at the beach.
    Lol. Try to get the Greeks and Turks to agree about that!
     
  14. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    7,779
    Likes Received:
    38,761
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks!
     
  15. allfatherodin

    allfatherodin Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    158
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Oh yea, I just nodded and smiled when they said it was a Greek or Turkish invention :p
     
  16. CSM1970

    CSM1970 Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2014
    Messages:
    2,798
    Likes Received:
    13,351
    Location:
    Texas
    I am fond of Turkish coffee and have several of the pots used to make it. I have a small can of ground coffee and even som cardamom to spice it with. Now ai need to pry my fat keester off the couch and go make some!
     
  17. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Messages:
    6,653
    Likes Received:
    26,211
    Location:
    Scott County,Tennessee
    I make cowboy coffee in an ibrik. Which is pretty much just like boiling the coffee in a cup. I like doing it that way so I can pour the coffee in a cup after letting the grounds settle.
    I have had plain old black Turkish coffee, and I liked it. I don’t know if I’d be a big fan of cardamom in my coffee though.
     

Share This Page