Twig Stove Recommendations

Discussion in 'Cooking & Water Purification' started by HannahT, Sep 15, 2018.

  1. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Now that I'm building fires more often away from my usual spot in the yard, I'm becoming more conscious of my surroundings when I build one. Therefore I'd like to invest in some sort of twig stove, for when the area I'm cooking in isn't the greatest for building an open fire. But I'm a bit lost on the stoves. What are the advantages and disadvantages of the different styles? I like the idea of the ones you can dismantle and store flat, but I'm open to any kind. Also, since they can be expensive, are there any "budget" ones that are decent, so I can try some styles before I settle on one?
     
  2. kihnspiracy

    kihnspiracy Tracker

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    I have an Emberlit Titanium stove that I really like. I also have the Bushcraft Outfitters 2 piece grill set to go with it. I think I paid $60 for it from Amazon. The grill set I think was $15.
     
  3. xrayit

    xrayit Supporter Supporter

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    I like the Emberlit TI (compact and light weight) , Firebox Gen 2 (compact but really heavy when fully outfitted). Have a couple Firebox Nanos that I keep in the truck but for everyday cooking I like the bigger 5 inch wood burners.
     
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  4. Foilist

    Foilist Guide

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    I have an original Bushbox that I got from a forum member here cheaply. It works really well for simple cooking, but all of these things require constant feeding. I do enjoy using it though.
     
  5. Birdman

    Birdman Guide

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    For a stove that folds flat, I'm a fan of the Vargo Hexagon. It needs modified to be "perfect" however. I found that if you put 1/2" holes in each wall to aid in drawing in air, you'll get a more efficient burn. No pieces to loose as it is all hinged together, and set up is pretty much instant.
    20180915_102356.jpg
    20180915_102424.jpg

    If space isn't as much of a concern, the gasifier type stoves(solo,toaks,etc.), have a better, cleaner, hotter burn. They don't fold up flat though.

    I use my hexagon more often, as it fits much better in my lumbar day kit.
    Otherwise, I use the Toaks wood stove, and really like it.
     
  6. DKR

    DKR Scout

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    The Hex is a good, solid piece of gear. It also plays well with a Trangia type alcohol burner for when outdoor 'campfires' are banned.

    Like this. << mash here

    This assumes you have an alky burner - I'm a fan of the Trangia systems.
     
  7. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    You can make your own.
    Google DIY twig stoves...
     
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  8. zelph

    zelph Guide Vendor Supporter

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    Folding Sterno Stove

    [​IMG]
     
  9. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    Firebox 5" folding stove 1st version is what I own. I also own an Emberlit but I prefer the Firebox because of it's easier deployment. If cost is a factor the Emberlit is cheaper and still a good stove......
    Dominick......
     
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  10. CowboyJesus

    CowboyJesus Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    how cheap are you?

    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/wifes-loss-my-gain.139698/
    a few years back, i made one from an old cookie sheet my wife was going to toss. i've made several others sense then (and given them away) i also have some desktop computer cases that i'm intending to do the same with eventually. might be something to try if you'd prefer to spend time before spending cash!
     
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  11. Big ian

    Big ian Tracker

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    I also suggest DIY. Not so hard as you'd think.
     
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  12. Birdman

    Birdman Guide

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    Look up IKEA wood burning stove DIY. I made one. Just made feet, cut a hole to push wood through, and called it good. Worked just fine. Not as efficient as a gasifier, and took up more room than a flat stove, but for less than $5. Worked good.
     
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  13. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    I not sure they even make these anymore, I got it from Sportsmans guide several years ago I use it from time to time. Folds up pretty good. I'll try to get some better pics of it and see if I can find one online somewhere.


    [​IMG]
     
  14. beachbunny

    beachbunny Scout

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    bushbuddy
     
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  15. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks everybody! I'll look into all these great suggestions. I may try the DIY route, atleast until I find a style/design I like.
     
  16. KnOeFz

    KnOeFz Scout

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    Look at the MSP Core 4
    Many ways to set it up, small flat package.
    Priced competative.
    Burns like crazy :D

    [​IMG]
     
  17. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    If you have a tin can and a pocket knife, make one! My first one was done that way. It works great. Search here for can stoves. LOTS of ideas. They are quite simple, and really the tin can CAN do the job. No need for gasifiers or whatever. I made mine with a double bottom so zero ash/coal/spark can get out the bottom.

    DO IT. We will be here to cheer you on.
     
  18. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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  19. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    @NevadaBlue that's a cool setup! I think I'll go find me some big cans. I'll also find something to make a folding stove out of, cookie sheet or otherwise :D
     
  20. Gumbi

    Gumbi Guide Bushclass I

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    A wood stove is definitely a compromise of trade-offs, but I've found the one that best suits me.

    I really like my Toaks backpacker wood stove. It's titanium, but it's affordably priced and lightweight 3.5 oz. Both of these characteristics were important to me, but especially the lightweight.

    It doesn't fold flat, but it's 3 pieces that extremely easily slide together in 2 seconds. You could put it together blindfolded while wearing mittens. This was important to me because especially in cold weather, I didn't like the fiddle factor of trying to line up tabs and slots. The 3 pieces slide together and nest inside the Toaks titanium 750 ml pot (Which I also have).

    Lastly, it holds enough wood inside that you don't to constantly feed and babysit it. Some of the smaller stoves are just difficult to keep going. Some of the bigger stoves weigh a considerable amount and are more pricey. To me, the Toaks is the best of all world's.

    The downsides are that it doesn't fold flat, and it's height makes it a bit tippy.

    https://www.amazon.com/Toaks-Outdoor-Titanium-Backpacking-Burning/dp/B01I4FMPQY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1537047707&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=toaks+stove+small&dpPl=1&dpID=41+cziPpdbL&ref=plSrch

    View attachment 424232
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    Edit: I'm not sure how to make the pictures show up, they were attachments on another post of mine, and I no longer have the original pictures.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  21. CowboyJesus

    CowboyJesus Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    yep. duh. how did we all forget to mention the old hobo stove? one of the first things i made after joining here! i think i only recently let it finally end up in the recycling.....
     
  22. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    My first hobo stove was a regular sized tin can that had to have SHAVINGS stuffed through the mouth every few seconds :18: I'll try a bigger one that's scientifically designed (not cut out willy nilly) :4:
     
  23. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I made one long ago from a small can, with a few holes. It sat in a Sterno folding stove since I didn’t have a grill. They can be very simple, just a contained tiny camp fire.
     
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  24. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    Is that a pocket stove ?
     
  25. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Yep, that slipped my mind as well CJ, they do make a great stove Nevadablue. I think I still have this one around somewhere. Made allot of char on this one as well.
    [​IMG]
     
  26. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Yes, it will fit in a pocket, here are some better pics. Here is a pic of it folded for size comparison that is my Esee 3

    [​IMG]

    Unfolded below.
    [​IMG]
     
  27. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    No .Thats the name .

    Sorry .Pocket cooker .I got one from Backwoodsman Magazine about 10years ago Capture+_2018-09-15-19-06-16.png
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  28. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Yep then it is true to its name. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  29. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    I have the pocket cooker mentioned above .And it works . Kinda heavy for my liking.

    I have a gi canteen stove that I mostly use with hexamine tabs

    And I got a firebox nano for my bday in July .I like it alot . Very compact .Also holds my trangia.
     
  30. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Roger and thanks.
     
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  31. Big ian

    Big ian Tracker

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  32. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic

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    Hi Hannah,

    I've owned full-sized Emberlit (Ti and Stainless), Emberlit Fireant (Ti), Toaks, and a Solo wood stove. I currently only own a full-sized Emberlit and the Solo stove. I'll share some thoughts after using them.

    There are two main types of wood stoves. I'll call the first "regular" and the second is called a "wood gas" stove. Regular wood stoves are simple: they're just a container for you to build a fire in. Just from using them, I think they're a little more efficient than a campfire, mostly because they usually have less ash left over. This could just be because of the fuel size you use is smaller, or maybe because you just use less fuel in general.

    Wood gas stoves have two chambers, and work on some pretty cool but fairly irrelevant science. They are more efficient, they burn cleaner, and they leave almost no ash afterwards. They can also be a pain the rumpus (which is not to be confused with a Krampus). With a regular wood stove, if the fire dies out, you have a nice bed of embers and its pretty easy to get a new fire started in there again - just like starting a fresh fire right after a fire has burned out, which is generally pretty easy. With a gas stove, you don't have embers left over, and if you don't keep it fully stocked to keep burning, your gasifier stops and you have to start from scratch. If you wait too long to add more wood, the new wood might actually put it out, or not catch before the fire is extinguished, and you're starting from scratch. That being said, you can get some pretty cool gas-burning effects with wood gas stoves that are alllllmost like using a gas burner. Some people have had issues with wind blowing their wood gas stoves out, but I haven't had that issue.

    The main thing about wood stoves is having a way to keep feeding them. Some - like the Emberlit - give you a tiny cut out that they imagine people stick wood into. Yeah right. I'm sure some people get that to work, but feeding wood into the bottom of a fire never worked well for me. In the smaller Emberlit model, the Fire Ant, the hole is even tinier. The best use for these holes is not feeding the fire, but starting the fire. Build your fire in the stove, grab the stove, lift stove, insert lighter or match, and voila! Fire. (...Put stove down now. It'll get hot.) The Toaks fed from a hole in the top, which I found much more useful. In general, I fed all my stoves by just inserting wood into the top, just like I was putting wood on top of a campfire.

    Using a wood stove changes the way you build your fires. I don't build campfires and stove fires the same - stove fires are in a tiny box, they're kept fairly vertical, and in general I haven't had issues with wood smothering them. With campfires, it is very easy to smother your fire. Of course, I've seen some people just put a tinder nest in a wood stove, light it, and then start adding the wood; while it works, it always seemed easier to build first and then light for me.

    I currently only use one of my two remaining stoves, and that stove is the Solo stove (their smallest version, whatever its called, Lite?). Why? I found it was the easiest one to use; I was able to learn how to stoke it appropriately, and it also works well as a pot stand and windscreen for my alcohol stove. The only other one that worked well with my alcohol stove was the Fire Ant, and while that worked and was lighter, I didn't like using it as a wood stove (I had to keep everything too short, had to feed it constantly, and it just wasn't for me).

    So a couple things to keep in mind:
    1. Ease of set up. Emberlits are cool and work well, but are a pain to set up. The Toaks one is easy to set up. The Solo doesn't really have a set up. Some, like the Firebox which I haven't used, fold - so I don't think they'd be too hard to set up.
    2. Ease of fuel sources - wood, alcohol burners, Esbit tabs, etc. The Fire Ant (and maybe the bigger Emberlit) had little tray so you could use solid fuel at an appropriate height from the pot. The Solo stove works well with alcohol stoves. I believe the Firebox also has a set up with pins so you can use alcohol stoves. The solo stove has a a fairly shallow fire box, so you're more limited in wood choices (or amount of processing) there than in, say, the full sized ember lit.
    3. Weight. The Firebox weighs 2lbs, the Fire Ant Ti weighs 2.8 oz. If you're carrying it, that may be a bigger deal. The Toaks Ti stove is 5.5oz, and the solo stove lite is 9 oz, so maybe not so big of a deal.
    4. Wood gas or not wood gas? Not wood gas = regular campfire, more unburned residual, ember beds to cook on. Wood gas = no ember beds, cool gas flame, very efficient.
    5. What kind of cooking are you planning to do? Boil water? Bake bread? Scramble eggs? (You should see some of the videos the Firebox guy puts out on baking with a zebra pot on the firebox... That is pretty cool.)

    Anyways, just wanted to share some stuff I got from spending way too much time and money on various wood stoves. Each one of them has pros and cons. I think you can't beat the Solo stove in terms of simplicity.

    I had a hard time finding pictures of the stoves. These were the best I found.

    Solo stove used as a base for alcohol stove: IMG_2549.JPG

    Fire ant used as a wood stove: (none of these twigs were over 6" long, yet you can see how there's no way you could set a pot on there)
    IMG_1569.JPG

    Fire ant used as a base for alcohol stove: (notice the really tiny feeding hole)
    IMG_3376.JPG

    Fire ant used wit solid fuel insert.
    IMG_5396.JPG

    Full-size Emberlit, close up of feeding hole:
    \ IMG_0181.JPG
     
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  33. Haggis

    Haggis Guide

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    As mentioned above, DIY hobo stoves are as good as any other. The original hobo stove, and still the best, was a #10 can. The closest store bought portable/packable twig stove to the original #10 can is the Littlbug Sr. twig stove. There is also a Littlbug Jr.. Either of the Littlbug stoves should be at the top of any list of commercial twig stoves,,,

    https://littlbug.com/littlbug-senior-stove/

    A Mors pot and a Littlbug Jr.
    C61B27A5-8679-4CE7-9B24-C0CF51B6CE6D.jpeg

    The Littlbug Jr. in its case, inside the Mors pot
    0407DCEE-B191-4B0A-A5CD-B19E064E9090.jpeg

    And the lid tightly on the Mors pot, the Littlbug Jr. inside...
    87CC856A-1FEF-4C4D-AC72-F75DFA357B7E.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018 at 5:15 PM
  34. stillscout

    stillscout Supporter Supporter

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  35. Gumbi

    Gumbi Guide Bushclass I

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    When you are using a wood stove, you will quickly learn to figure out which way the wind is blowing, and face the feeding hole into the wind. Otherwise the wind will blow the flames out of the feeding hole and burn your fingers when you try to feed it.
     
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  36. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Good to know... I would've turned it the other way :8:
     
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  37. WesinND

    WesinND Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I made this one for bushclass. It's long gone but it worked really well.

     
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  38. woodsranger

    woodsranger Scout

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    I used to use the sterno folding stove as a wood stove because it was simple, sturdy and folded flat. Now (although I rarely cook in the woods anymore, but if I want to brew a cup of tea) I just dig a small hole, build a twig fire in it, and lay a small grill over the hole. Or build a small twig fire between two rocks and put the grill on top of the rocks.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  39. Big ian

    Big ian Tracker

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    Solid info here.

    Only thing I would (wood?:)) add is while it's easy to want to go small to maximize on low weight, it can be a right PITA to process wood down to tiny 4" pencils, especially in inclement weather. I've come to prefer hobo style wood stoves with lots of room up top to feed fuel (or to put in "too-long" pieces in such a way that they don't interfere with your pot). Maybe you lose a bit of usable heat to the pot, but ease-of-use is hugely improved upon. If you had to break it down to a statistic or ratio, it would be "get the stove with the biggest burn box for the weight that you can afford, that is easiest to feed". For me, that became a DIY one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  40. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock Still going Supporter

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    Plus 1 on the folding sterno stove !
    Cheep and easy can also be used with alcohol burners.
     
  41. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Wow, lots of great ideas! Thanks guys!
     
  42. KnOeFz

    KnOeFz Scout

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    The Core 4 becomes a real flamethrower in gassifier setup :)

    [​IMG]
     
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  43. Blackhillz

    Blackhillz Scout

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    I love my Emberlit Stainless, goes with me everywhere and fits inside my mess kit for transport.

    [​IMG]
     
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  44. KFF

    KFF Scout

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    My entire kitchen fits inside my ikea stove and with room to spare. 1000ml ss pot with lid, my mug is a Toaks 750ml ti pot, utensils, condiments. Rest can be filled with teabags and cup soups for several days worth and all packed into a bag made out of a leg of old worktrousers with multitude of pockets. And about 3lb of dog hair softening it all up :D

    DSC_2058-800x600.jpg
     
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  45. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Guide

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    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are."
    hello,
    DITTO you beat me to it. @HannahT is a clever peep & hides her light (literally) under a bushel :D LOL save yourself some Buck$ DIY.
    Regards
    David
     
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  46. OMRebel

    OMRebel He who piddles Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Here is my hobo stove. Can't get more economical than this, unless someone gives you the can (but then you miss out on the coffee)
    20180916_172935.jpg 20180916_174924.jpg 20180916_175434.jpg
    Ginger tea....angh
     
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  47. wvtracker14

    wvtracker14 Hardwoodsman #9 Supporter Hardwoodsman

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    Really like the Firebox Nano and if weight is a concern get the titanium version, if not pair it with the X-case to have a nice little kit.
     
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  48. xrayit

    xrayit Supporter Supporter

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    Love the Firebox’s ability to support heavy cast iron pans.

    IMG_2538.jpg IMG_2539.jpg IMG_2540.jpg
     
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  49. halo2

    halo2 Scout

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    I built a quick and dirty one this weekend to cook some charcloth. Worked great! It looks very similar to the others in the thread - a large coffee can with a 2"x3" slot cut into it about 1 1/2" inches above the bottom with 3/8" holes drilled for air at the bottom and 1/8" holes in the top for a grate and a bale. I used a piece of hardware mesh to keep the fuel above the air holes. Took 30 or so minutes to make but I wasn't trying to make it pretty.

    twigstove01.jpg
     
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  50. Skruffy

    Skruffy Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I like the Bushbox pocket twig stove. It is flat and uses very little space so it works great with a haversack or sling pack. There's several places I like to go that I can't burn wood, but I can use it with a Trangia or Esbit tabs. Nice to have alternative fuel choices.

    Bushbox Pocket Stove.jpg
     
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