Uses of the plant Mullein.

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Flint_2016, Aug 3, 2016.

  1. Flint_2016

    Flint_2016 Guide

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    Hey all
    I come across Mullein in my travels,it being in flower in July in eastern U.S.I found a website on uses and preparation of the plant.If there are any other uses, please list them for me.Here's the website(A Modern Herbal | Mullein, Great).

    1.The dried leaves are sometimes smoked in an ordinary tobacco pipe to relieve the irritation of the respiratory mucus membranes, and will completely control, it is said, the hacking cough of consumption. They can be employed with equal benefit when made into cigarettes, for asthma and spasmodic coughs in general.Great Mullein has been used as an alternative medicine for centuries, and in many countries throughout the world, the value of Mullein as a proven medicinal herb is now backed by scientific evidence.
    2.Fomentations and poultices( a soft, usually heated substance that is spread on cloth and then placed on the skin to heal a sore or reduce pain) of the leaves have been found serviceable in hemorrhoidal complaints.
    3.Mullein is said to be of much value in diarrhea, from its combination of demulcent with astringent properties, by this combination strengthening the bowels at the same time. In diarrhea the ordinary infusion is generally given, but when any bleeding of the bowels is present, the decoction(the act or process of boiling usually in water so as to extract the flavor or active principle) prepared with milk is recommended.
    4.An oil produced by macerating Mullein flowers in olive oil in a corked bottle, during prolonged exposure to the sun, or by keeping near the fire for several days, is used as a local application in country districts in Germany for piles and other mucus membrane inflammation, and also for frost bites and bruises. Mullein oil is recommended for earache and discharge from the ear, and for any eczema of the external ear and its canal.
    5.A decoction of its roots was held to be an alleviation for toothache, and also good for cramps and convulsions, and an early morning draught of the distilled water of the flowers to be good for gout.
    I suppose by going to sites like Youtube will be also helpful on how to further prepare the plant.
    mulleinflwr (1).JPG
     
  2. Harper

    Harper Guide

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  3. Guillaume Longval

    Guillaume Longval Scout

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    Harper beat me to it.

    - dry stalks make a formidable hand drill spindle
    - favorite toilet paper to be found in the woods
     
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  4. Harper

    Harper Guide

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    With respect to ear infections, you should look into using a few drops of Mullein infused oil combined with Garlic infused oil. Mullein removes the wax and Garlic has anti-biotic properties for the infection. They work well together. Kind of stinks though...

    Make sure you do your due diligence. Some people recommend not putting anything into the ear.


     
  5. lowtidejoe

    lowtidejoe Tracker

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    Cowboy Toilet paper
    Dry stalks make a good spindle
     
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  6. Mazer

    Mazer Scout

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    Mullein, Verbascum thapsus, is that common sidewalk weed you’ve no doubt seen around in disturbed places like vacant lots and overgrown yards. It grows in direct sunlight — or perhaps I should say, this being a Portland winter, direct cloudlight. The leaves are pale green and adorably fuzzy. Its first-year shape is a rosette, and then in its second year it sends up a tall flowering stalk with yellow blossoms. And by tall I mean really tall — eight feet tall! (See photo below).

    I was just over 100 pages into Love in the Time of Cholera, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, when I was surprised to find the characters using mullein for fishing. They put mullein in the water to stun the fish and send them floating to the surface, making it easy to net their catch en masse.

    This works in real life. The seeds and flowers of mullein contain compounds called saponins. Saponins are soap-like and are highly toxic to insects and cold-blooded aquatic creatures. (They are harmless to people when cooked). If you find yourself in a survival situation and need to eat? Mullein saves the day.

    You may have seen mullein in a health food store as an herbal tea for respiratory irritation. It is antimicrobial and antispasmodic for coughs.

    Or you may have seen mullein flower oil sold as a remedy for ear infections. The season for flower harvesting is summer, but you can pick the leaves and dry them for tea any time. I prefer the leaves from the first-year plants.

    Here are two lesser-known uses for mullein:

    * As a primitive candle: Drip the flower stalk in something flammable — such as wax or fat from a roadkill animal — and use it as a torch. I have seen this done, and it is awesome.

    * As a smoking herb: Mullein is a respiratory medicine and so smoking the dried leaves is one way to bring that medicine directly into the lungs. You could also more recreationally use it as a soft, cooling, airy base for herbal smoking mixtures. It is very mildly sedating. I like to combine it with lemon balm and Russian sage, as I have written about before, but it’s great in many combinations.
    You can find mullein in sunny, disturbed waste places like roadsides. Native American tribes historically smoked the dried leaves of the fuzzy plant, known by its Latin name Verbascum thapsus, for an array of healing uses. The Navajo used it to cure fevers; the Hopi as a cure for insanity; the Iroquois for hiccups. Modern herbalists regard it as soothing for the lungs. add it to smoking mixtures because it adds a fluffy, soft, airy texture; pair it with some lemon balm, a.k.a. Melissa officinalis.

    leaves and flowers are edible, enjoying a cup of tea made from these parts is generally preferable. Leaves and flowers can be
    used in a salad

    I found this contradictory report - Extracts of the mullein leaf have also been shown in laboratory studies to possess antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, and - most interestingly for the purpose of this paper - antibacterial properties."

    The authors also observed that mullein had been shown in trials to significantly improve ear pain. It rivals a popular pharmaceutical in controlling Klebsiella pneumoniae, and it is reported that many of mullein's historical uses have proven to be true.

    Mullein also has anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic properties. A mullein poultice soothes skin irritations, such as rashes, boils, and even chilblains. A poultice can also be used for bruises and to relieve arthritic and rheumatic conditions. The herb's anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties make mullein compresses an ideal treatment for hemorrhoids and cold sores.

    Mullein relieves digestive disorders, such as diarrhea and stomach pains. Its anti-spasmodic properties relieve stomach cramps. Mullein oil derived from the plant's flowers can be used to treat swollen glands and earaches.

    In addition, mullein:

    *has a calming effect and can be used as a sleep aid.
    *relieves migraine pain.
    *supports proper functioning of the thyroid gland.

    Mullein has no serious recorded side effects. However, taking it in excess can result in stomach upset, and it is also prudent to lightly scrub the thin hairs off the plant leaves as they can result in irritation in some people.

    Even though it is found in dry, barren areas, mullein will also thrive in moist soil. It is easy to grow and thrives in gardens.

    Mullein tea is simple to make. Just steep the leaves in hot water. For a sweeter taste, the flowers can be added. You can drink the tea, hot or cold. Any excess tea can be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

    Making the oil is also easy:

    *Harvest the flowers while they are fresh.

    *Completely fill a jar with the flowers.

    *Mash the flowers with a fork, but not to the point that they would pass through a strainer.

    *Add olive oil to the jar, completely submerging the flowers. Stir, making sure that there are no bubbles.

    *Cover the jar and leave on a sunny windowsill for five days.

    *After the fifth day, remove the oil by straining the mixture.

    *Pour the oil into another glass jar, cover, and put in a cool place until needed. Mullein oil has a long shelf life of up to two years.

    Having mullein at your fingertips can be the answer to alleviating chronic respiratory and other conditions - and you may find that constant visits to the doctor's office are a thing of the past.

    Note: Because of their toxicity, the seeds of the mullein plant should never be used in preparing tea or oil.

    Learn more: Discover the many uses of mullein
     
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  7. Harper

    Harper Guide

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    I know that smoking Mullein was something that was done in the past. As I explained in one of the posts I listed above, I would inhale the vapor instead.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2016
  8. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    TP ....can't really be dried much for use.....gets crumbly.
    Dried stalks for hand drill fire making.
     
  9. Flint_2016

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    Will try putting it in my pipe sometime,being mildly sedating.A legal healthy buzz.Thanks,Mazer
     
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  10. Flint_2016

    Flint_2016 Guide

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    I imagine it'd have to be an older,taller specimen to make a spindle for a bow drill set,having to be more woody,than a green stalk.
     
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  11. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Yeah, It does.....
     
  12. alukban

    alukban Guide

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    I mean this in the most respectful manner possible brother but...

    If you are going to just copy and insert the entire contents of other websites, you should really quote it and attribute reference to the original author and/or website.

    If you are the original author from where the above was copied (and I do know where it comes from), thank you for the less mainstream/occult references of the uses of saponin-rich plants :dblthumb:
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2016
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  13. Mazer

    Mazer Scout

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    Sorry I threw my back out.....wanted to get the info out before I forgot what I was responding to..PS - Im not a brother, but a sister - looks like we both need to do our homework
     
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  14. Jonah L. Archer

    Jonah L. Archer Guide Bushclass II

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    The stalks have a pithy center that supposedly catch a spark fairly easily... I have not yet tried it though.
     
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  15. schapm

    schapm Supporter Supporter

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    I have tried many times to make that work with flint and steel but have never gotten it to take a spark. The only uncharred material I've had success with is milkweed ovums.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  16. Matthart

    Matthart Tinder Gatherer

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    I've made cough syrup from mullein, and it worked very well. Make a strong tea from the dried plant -- roots, leaves, flowers. Reduce it a bit, add honey. One tablespoon will help with cough ... it'll also either a) give you a bit of constipation, just like a codeine cough syrup, or b) get rid of the runs!
     
  17. southron

    southron Scout

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    Pretty much everything I know already has been told.

    I will add that I mix mullen with purple top clover dried and then burn it and breath the smoke for cough / congestion / stopped up head. Helps clear out breathing all the way down. Either alone works, but why not double up.

    Good excuse to whittle yourself a hobbit pipe if you want that fun.

    Jim
     
  18. 80mtn

    80mtn Banned Member Banned

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    You guys back east can use the mullein mixed with Coltsfoot leaves and flowers. This is what old timey pharmacists rolled cigarettes out of for asthma or other respiratory problems.
    I'm in New Mexico. We don't have coltsfoot here. :-(

    It also is good for holding other plant material in place in a poultice.
     

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