Walking help

Discussion in 'Outings, Trips & Expeditions' started by MommaJ, Aug 17, 2019.

  1. Noddy

    Noddy Scout

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    @chndlr04, I get it:)

    I think the point is that there is no power in the pole. Apart from making you look a certain way, I have always thought the conventional trekking pole unbalances you - so that you don't rely on quads, glutes, core and back-posture to maintain a solid gait - and also (as a result) the standard pole puts stress on your wrists, elbows and shoulder girdle. It also seems to excuse dropping your head forward .. which in the end weighs a lot :).

    I'd go so far as to say that the only proper use for a conventional pole is to hold up one end of a tarp :) That said, I have seen lots of alpinists with poles, and the scandinavian tradition of walking and x-country skiing with poles (and its particular, attendant stride) can't be entirely overlooked, I guess.

    Anyway and whatever, this is not that. The Pacer Pole - with the reversed handle and associated techniques of use - isn't a crutch. It is a correctional and mnemonic device used to rehabilitate your walking towards a less effortful and more sustainable mechanics of exercise by making you think about foot placement, rhythm etc. It will, even if you adopt only the technique of their use and not the poles themselves, improve the efficacy of your pace even to the point that you may find it hard work keeping up with yourself.

    If you are a 200lb pneumatic athlete, this isn't likely for you. But that's not everyone :) Though agfain, that said, my guess is that there are plenty of hale lads and lasses out there using these poles. They pretty popular.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
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  2. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    A lot of really good stuff in this thread. Really good stuff. :)

    I have found that for me, walking with a purpose is a driving factor. I'll go for walks to look for things, such as chaga or birch bark. Looking for sparky rocks. For mushrooms. Sometimes a destination, I'll walk to a certain place and make a cup of coffee or something.

    We live 5 miles from town. I'm thinking that soon I might start walking to town once a week or so. We have a nice ATV trail that leads to town. It crosses a river twice, and is a beautiful ride, so I imagine it would be a nice walk too. :)
     
  3. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

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    Use your pole instead of your feet to discover where the snakes are.
     
  4. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    So many good ideas.

    On the weekends, yes on the weekdays, no. Between dinner, kids schedules, and household responsibilities I have an hour window to walk without having to stop and do other stuff.

    Shortened things a bit. Life is going to be 1 big rehab for me. Going to a geneticist on the 28th to answer the questions my rheumatologist says doesn't matter but my reg doc says does matter in how they treat me.

    As such it's a use or or loose it with my muscles. So with most issues in my si joint and hips walking keeps the muscles strong to help prevent me from constantly partially dislocating then

    I meditate daily before bed to relax my muscles so I'm going to look into walking meditations and see if that will be a good addition.
     
  5. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    I love this thread, except for the need for the original request. I hope you're seeing improvements, Janis.

    While walking this weekend, I practiced using my walking stick like a martial artist/marching band leader. It was goofy but fun, at least until a bear crossed my path. :eek:
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
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  6. 66drifter

    66drifter Guide

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    chndlr04, the staff does provide a bit of rhythm but it is mostly for balance on un-even ground

    far too many folks find them cumbersome because they get one that is too heavy and their hands aren't comfortably fit/positioned on them

    saplings any heavier than a good dried cedar or seasoned bamboo are counterproductive IMHO

    the heavier "sticks" take more energy to wield than they're worth

    a good firm/light weight staff is a delight to swing/walk to

    i use one when walking flea mkts and outdoor craft fairs now and it allows me to go farther between rest stops

    my current 1st choice staff is made from a flower stem from the yucca cactus plant

    th.jpeg

    light in weight and stout when gathered dead/dry(winter)

    sotol.jpg

    they pull right off the plantn and the bud stems can easily be removed

    buds cut off.jpg

    once any/all appendages have been removed it gets brushed w/ a wire brush(longitudinally) then sanded and oiled w/ teak oil to give it something other than it's natural gray colouring

    a good coat of spar varnish finishes it off nicely

    coated w: teak oil.jpg

    here's where a well prepared trekker puts some extra cordage on the staff

    some strong light twine whip'd around the bottom capped w/ a rubber crutch tip

    IMG_3332.jpg

    and some synthetic bank line whipped from above to below the hand hold position

    whipping the extra cordage allows easy removal if/when needed

    the thong needs to be hung from the very top of the staff and for this one i took paracord(extra HD cordage if needed) and tripple braided it long enuff for the extra to hang loose(i gently stitched it back to the thong to prevent it getting hung up in branches)

    IMG_3334.jpg

    the thong needs to be set so when properly used it positions the forearm parallel to the ground

    the length of a staff should be between shoulder and head high

    i like mine top of my head high so it automatically measures the height of an obstruction ahead of me(awnings @ flea mkts & limbage in the woods)

    the length of YOUR staff should be as long as the top of your head so long as it will fit in your vehicle for transport

    IMG_3333.jpg

    holding a staff is like holding a ski pole in in downhill skiing

    up thru the bottom of the loop w/ the loop over the top of your wrist

    IMG_3306.jpg

    then wrap the thong and the staff between the thumb n forefinger to grasp

    IMG_3305.jpg

    with ALL of the staff wrapping and thong in your grasp your thumb should just cover the fingernail of your forefinger for proper trail/trekking fit

    once you get the fit right your wrist will rest in a position that naturally holds the staff into the crook between your forefinger & thumb w/o you needing to actually hold the staff in place and your forearm will be level/parallel/horizontal w/ the ground under your feet

    learning to swing a staff that is fit correctly to the user is a piece o cake ;-)

    a staff will provide that slight bit of extra balance thus reducing the strain on the knees n ankles making the trek much more pleasant in the process

    a properly sized and fitting staff doesn't strain the wrist or neck/shoulder muscles in the least

    improperly designed/sized/weighted/fitting "sticks" are the scurge of comfortable trekking IMHO ;-)

    as for defensive purposes there are many more appropriate pieces of kit for that
     
  7. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

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    Like, a spear!!! :D

    20190612_134229.jpg
     
  8. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I am happy to walk up to 2 miles off trail but in pain to walk around the grocery store. Day by day step by step.

    It's a journey that is teaching me a ton.
    • The importance of the right food. I always thought we ate pretty well until starting the low fodmap with high antioxidant foods diet
    • The importance of moving with purpose verse just moving without thinking.
    • The difference between soft pack and hard pack surfaces plus ultra soft surfaces. Sand walking no good, off trail great, on a beaten trail iffy, paved surfaces way to hard . Hehehe I'm like Goldilocks when walking
    • How much pharmaceuticals hide issues while treating other issues.
    • Float pods are amazing and not a gimmick but oh so expensive.
     
  9. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Heed the call. Supporter

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    As for the boredom I usually take a slingshot.
     
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  10. PMSteve

    PMSteve Old Timey Outdoorsman Supporter

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    I used to listen to a walkman while riding my motorcycle. One afternoon I was entering a canyon when the song list came to a heavy metal track. I began to roll on the throttle through the corners until my foot pegs were scraping the blacktop, sending up sparks from each peg. The thing is, I never intentionally sped up. I was simply riding in tune with the music. I believe I may have killed myself if I hadn't noticed the sparklers at my feet.

    Steve
     
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  11. CosmicJoke

    CosmicJoke Supporter Supporter

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    Sorry to hear you are having some issues @MommaJ , but glad to hear you are doing better.

    I hike a lot of the same areas, and almost always see/find something I hadn't noticed before. But at times I have a bad habit of going off trail, more so when I am by myself. I am always looking for things when I am out, deer, turkey, rabbits, squirrels etc. , so I never get bored when I am in the woods.
     
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