What do you do for a living and how does it relate to Bushcraft?

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by BushcrafterAU, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. Foilist

    Foilist Guide

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    No connection that I regularly apply.
     
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  2. Cascadian

    Cascadian Guide

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    It's all Greek to me.
     
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  3. Wildcat Creek

    Wildcat Creek Tracker

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    Worked maintenance at a large office building in a big city, which included 2 TV stations, phew, dirt time on my days off.
    Retired now, live by a large wilderness area, dirt time 7/24.
    The "dirt" keeps my spirit clean.
     
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  4. DixiePreparedness

    DixiePreparedness Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    When/if I actually get to go back to work......

    I travel all over the U.S. delivering new trucks (big trucks).
    I take them from “A” to “B”...... and then travel back to “A” by plane/bus/automobile.

    I live for 30 days at a time out of two wheeled Seahorse cases (50# max each) and a backpack (carry-on size.... and light enough to be comfortably carried on my back while I haul the boxes).

    I literally have to be able to carry everything that sustains me and my job, all at the same time, on foot, in one trip, EVERYWHERE I GO.
    (Like infantry. LOL)

    Minimal “luggage space” and specialized “equipment” leaves little options for my clothing/personal stuff. (And winter gets more difficult)

    So I guess the bushcraft relation would be the “minimalistic gear” style of my life on the road, and the need to carry everything I may need but nothing I don’t.

    There is a couple pics of what my “kit” looks like most of the time on this thread.....

    http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/heavy-travel-shoulder-bag-suggestions.201251/
     
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  5. WhisperInThePine

    WhisperInThePine Wubba lubba dub dub Supporter

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    I'm a forester. I lay out timber sale boundaries, identify and cruise trees to determine defects and volume (timber cruising), then appraise the value of the trees and write logging contracts.

    Common outdoor tasks in my job:
    Tree and plant ID
    Insect and disease ID
    Hatchet and saw use
    Compass navigation (gps is used far more, but I still carry paper map and compass for backup)
    Hiking
    I was re-certified for Wilderness First Aid two months ago.

    Bushcrafty things I carry:
    Mora companion
    Compass
    PSK (still building but it includes mylar blanket, snare wire, ferro rod and striker, box cutter, signal mirror, button compass, quick tinders)
    Hatchet
    Bahco saw
    Frogg Togg poncho with bankline and stakes for shelter.
    Olicamp mug for tea or boiling water.
    FAK

    This is the only picture of me in the field. While laying out a riparian buffer, the ground gave out beneath me and I fell into a deep mud hole. My right leg hooked on a log and this saved me from sinking all the way. I never touched bottom of that hole and it was big enough to have swallowed me up. If you've never felt the ground literally fall out from under you, it is extremely terrifying. The soil/water was also highly acidic, those pants were rotted through three days later.
    Fell_Into_A_Fen.jpg

    I've been attacked by ground hornets and caught in freak snow storms. It's not uncommon for me to walk 6-10 miles a day in the field. One time we recorded 13 miles on the gps.

    But I still love my job. I get paid to hike around the Southern Rockies and look at trees. It's nice to have a little excitement in my life.:D
     
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  6. McKBrew

    McKBrew Roughian #103 Supporter

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    I did a short stint as a timber cruiser a few years back. Actually had every intention of going back to it this year but decided a guaranteed salary was more important. Not so sure I made the right call there.



     
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  7. manitoulinbound

    manitoulinbound Apple Fritter Lover Supporter

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    I just turned 40 and am lucky enough to be able to retire this year. I was in construction and real estate and got lucky in getting involved with the right investments at the right time. My work didn't involve bushcraft but I guess it now let's me bush craft when I want.
     
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  8. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    Heading back to school this fall at 36 year old to get my surveying AAS. Too much time behind a desk and decided to make the change.
     
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  9. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    I'm retired now but for over 30 years I worked as a forester. It was a field job which meant I was in the woods four or five days a week. I worked mostly alone. Mostly I set up timber sales, did timber and other biological inventories, located and marked boundaries, marked the trees to cut, administered timber sale contracts etc. Land navigation and plant identification are required skills. Looked for rare or endangered plants and worked on wildfires and prescribed burns. It was an ideal job for me.
     
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  10. Elwha

    Elwha Supporter Supporter

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    Retired now but was a project manager for Honeywell Aerospace. Been a woodsman since I was a young lad living right next to the Olympic National Park.
     
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  11. Diligence

    Diligence Tracker

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    I’m an engineer by education, breadwinner by need, but have been a Dad for 10 & 12 years and bushcraft is what I do with my kids (in between all the other Dad obligations) because it’s what I grew up doing.
     
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  12. Sabb0007

    Sabb0007 Supporter Supporter

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    I do IT work for the government. Sit at a desk all day. Pretty good time off, decent salary, 40 hrs per week. I have time and energy to devote to bushcraft among other things.
     
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  13. WhisperInThePine

    WhisperInThePine Wubba lubba dub dub Supporter

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    Wish we could have met up before I left the UP. I miss the Keewenaw and Marquette areas a lot. When I wasn't cruising timber, I was fishing or hiking. It was a great time.
     
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  14. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    If you come back for a visit let me know maybe we can meet up sometime.
     
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  15. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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    Former State Park Ranger, turned photojournalist. The former kept me outdoors, the second doesn't really tie in at all, other than learning how to stay alive in dangerous situations. Majored in forestry in college, then fisheries and wildlife, before switching to parks and rec.

    The stress of the second makes me enjoy the peace of being out in the woods all the more. :)
     
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  16. Dingo22

    Dingo22 Tracker

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    I build offroad motorcycles that are used by hunters, fishermen, backcountry fire crews, and other adventurers + outdoorsmen
     

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  17. Forestree

    Forestree Treeforest Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Have worked as a forestry technician (I work for a forester) for over 20 years now. I love being the woods and there are many jobs that will put you there....forestry was the path that got me there. Forest management is pretty broad and encompasses many things, but the common theme is that it mostly all takes place in the woods. I’ve always said that I don’t much care what I’m being paid to do as long as I’m in the woods :D My job now is in timber stand improvement and mainly deals with growing healthy trees. That includes lots of fun stuff including controlling non native invasive species, pre commercial thinning, vine control, prescribed burning, managing insects and disease.

    If someone truly enjoys being in the woods then they can find a job that will get them there.....some will pay more than others :53: But for the most part you’ll never be rich haha. I always thought that if I went back to school, I’d become a surveyor...now those guys are in the woods AND rich :4:
     
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  18. JMV

    JMV Tracker

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    I'm a swing shift surveillance observer at a central AZ casino. Doesn't have a damn thing to do with bushcraft other than making me want to get into the bush and away from all the disgusting things I see going on in the casino.
     
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  19. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    Wildlife biologist here. Occasional back country day trips, and one job living in primitive conditions for 3 months.
     
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  20. RangerWeaver

    RangerWeaver Woodloafer Supporter

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    I was an outdoors instructor when I was a teenager into my early 20's. After that I was an auto mechanic but that took most of my time and I worked weekends. Now I'm a pest controls specialist. I have weekends off and more time in the woods.
     
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  21. Forestree

    Forestree Treeforest Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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  22. DarrylM

    DarrylM Supporter Supporter

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    I've got 20+ years with a structural steel fabrication shop. Over the years I've done many things, but I've not become a certified welder. Most of my career there has been spent as an equipment and machine operator.

    It relates to bushcraft not a whole lot, but the shop is pretty much only there to keep the work dry. There is minimal consideration given to actual working temperatures, so I've become very aware of the weather and being prepared for it.
     
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  23. TWill

    TWill Guide

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    Career track is as follows...filler jobs over the last 40 years(worked since I was 13 years old)...construction, painting, hydroponics greenhouse worker, garden center worker, UPS air loader, hardware store clerk. First career type job out of college spent 12 years working in a group home for teen boys as a case worker in a hobby farm setting(basically being a parent to boys who couldn't give a spit about you or anyone else and when they did start to care about more than themselves they were ready to go on to the next less structured setting).
    Second career job was 13 years working for a Facility Dept. in a small college doing a variety of jobs with titles like Director of Housekeeping, Director of Security, Safety Manager and The Director Guy Who Gets Asked to Do Everything Because If You Say No They Might Want to Let You Go. Got let go anyhow in an outsourcing move with the rest of our staff but it was time to move on.
    3rd career rendition was as Ground Maintenance Manager at another much smaller college. It is a work program college so I had a student crew. Some loved working outside, others just didn't fit anywhere else so they sent them to me with mixed results on getting them to be useful. Eventually moved on to job #4 because of time and distance to job #3 and some half baked admin decisions I had to endure over the three years there.
    Job #4 was as Maintenance Technician for a local privately owned bank, 23 locations in MN. Did that for three years until the owners decided to sell to a bank based out of Evansville, IN that shall remain nameless even though it is old but hardly national. They outsource their maintenance to a company out of Indianapolis that offered me a bit more $$ hourly but their family insurance would have cost me $20,500 a year out of paycheck. I thanked them for their offer then moved on to job #5 in January this year.
    #5 is working in our small town for a local furniture store unloading semi trucks, installing window blinds, delivering flooring, moving furniture in the store as the sales staff needs us to and doing deliveries mostly within an hour of here. The pay is modest but the insurance is normal cost for our area. A few customers will tip us which is always nice but we never expect it or count on it. Generally the tippers are people who don't look like they have a lot, sometimes but not often it is people with some wealth.
    How do those job relate to bushcrafting? Some of them I had time and was part of my job to tend gardens or enjoy some time outdoors doing tasks like cutting brush or trimming trees. One winter night while working some college boys called me to ask if I could help guide them as they field dressed a deer they had a road kill tag for. Most of them had or have tools that I used and are active. I worked with college students which could be really rewarding if they were open to being challenged and stepped up to get things done otherwise I found a few to be SLACKERS but not most. I tend to be hands on and a helper of people and organizations, I like to be around people but tend to be linear in my thinking but encyclopedic in my knowledge(literally read and memorized encyclopedias as a kid among other things..I read a lot and still do). So there, not bad for a kid who was never really good at my gazintas in school.
    @Haggis, sometime I'd like to hear how you came to be a teacher. All I know is the potential of someone who was raised in KY is generally fairly high if they want to learn something and don't mind being "from KY". I'm a "From KY'er" also.
     
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  24. oldpinecricker

    oldpinecricker Supporter Supporter

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    Started logging with my dad so by the time I was a teen I was falling timber. After that I worked on a program with the USFS and university where I was on a silviculture crew putting in plots and data for EIS and old growth study, plant ID, and a bunch of Eco type of paperwork. Spent plenty of time surveying and marking timber and a bit on a fire crew.

    Worked again for the taxpayer. Then I went to the desert and saw other cultures and people in the early 90's. Did a stint in the region for too long and came back home.

    Did a bit of work in an metal fab business and then back logging and then into underground hard rock mining for a good deal of time. Then work on shipping speciality machinery and setting up areas for drilling/mining resource extraction and parameter for resource concessions. Worked on some security issues as well for resource based companies.
     
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  25. GoodPhotos

    GoodPhotos Father, Husband, Patriot, Entrepreneur Supporter

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    Location:
    Deep in wild wooded Western foothills of Maine
    Real Estate/Architecture Photographer.
    I drive my 22 yo Jeep 50,000 miles a year all over Maine from the high end condos and mansions in our big towns (we don't really have any 'cities') to the remote off grid camps on dead end Jeep trails in the unorganised territories and townships.
    IF I break down far from civilisation or for some reason had to walk all the way home, I wanted to have as many skills to carry on my way home as 'stuff' so I started expanding the groundwork that my dad laid around wood/bushcraft when I was a kid.
     
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  26. Top Gibson

    Top Gibson Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    retired a couple of years ago from soldierin'......don't do anything but hunt, fish, kayak, rucking, and camping......however, I don't know a thing about bushcraft....
     
  27. Teeps

    Teeps Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I work with children and adults with developmental disabilities. Professional good-day maker. It doesn't really have any bushcrafty elements to it except it helps me excel at maintaining a positive attitude which is a useful skill in the bush.
     
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  28. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

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    I'm 52 and feel the same way.

    You can work in an industry related to bushcraft, or you can make sure you have enough free time to do bushcraft as a hobby.

    Achieving some sort of satisfactory and enjoyable balance is the key.

    Keep your eyes and ears open, and follow your passion. But beware, passion can become a trap, or an obligation, and passion does sometimes fade or even die.
     
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  29. camp casey

    camp casey Guide

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    Back pack vacuum 5 miles a day, 25 miles a week 1300 miles a year.
     
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  30. Raymond Eisele

    Raymond Eisele Scout

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    Been a farmer since 1995, mechanic for 30 years before that. Raising animals, repairing equipment, harvesting crops or firewood. Fix it, fix it now, fix it with what you have on hand. Sort of a puzzle everyday. So is life. You will make a good choice. Best thing is you are thinking about the possibilies.
     
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  31. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Used to be a saying, common in some parts; “It’s a good place to be from,,, Far away from.”

    A fella who stays on his feet sees a lot of country over the course of a long life,,, I’ve certainly seen a lot of territory, worn a lot of hats, and somewhere along the way I picked up some degrees: a major in History, a major in French, a minor in Psychology, and a Master’s in Education. Don’t see a lot of fellas feeding a family with five bairns, and going to university whilst making a living trapping furs and riving out basket splits or hickory bark, but I was one of them.
     
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  32. Flint_2016

    Flint_2016 Rusty Hobbyist

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    After I worked 15 years in the strip mining industry(digging anthracite coal in eastern Pennsylvania)I went to a trade school and got a degree in landscape design.Identifying woody and herbaceous plants and trees was one of one of the courses.That definitely is related to bushcraft as it helps me identify edible and medicinal plants in the wilderness.I didnt work for long since the company I worked for only paid a lousy $6.50 an hour.But I did it on the side for friends,neighbors,and family.Other than landscaping and coal mining I was a cook at a smorgasboard type restaurant in Lancaster PA for a year and a half where I learned how to cook(grill,fry,etc)and took two gourmet cooking courses at a local trade school.That I suppose taught me how to BBQ meats,fish,etc.I'm the head cook at home as well.
    catsngear (55).jpg catsngear (54).JPG
    Dinner that night was an Angus London broil,with a home made Caesar salad(one of my specialties)and baked potato.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
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  33. Cascadian

    Cascadian Guide

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    Young man, it's not so much what you do, but how you do it.

    Learn how to confidently go up to adults, look them in the eye, extend your hand, offer your name and ask theirs. Smile wide, give their hand a good, solid, hearty shake, and keep eye contact. Then ask them what they do for a living. Follow up by asking them three things they've learned over the years of doing that.

    They'll faint. Then they'll make you vice president of something ... anything!

    Show up to work a bit early. Leave a bit late. Ask your boss how you can help him make money today. You're getting paid; he may or may not make any money at all.

    Ask for feedback. Take criticism and make changes. Thank people for their criticism.

    Keep to your word. Always!

    And remember, everyone is fighting a battle no one knows anything about, so be kind.


    It's not what you know, but who you know, and how you treat them.


    Bushcrafting requires you be true to yourself and the world around you. I just gave you a good start in that direction.
     
  34. BushcrafterAU

    BushcrafterAU Master Tracker Supporter

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    Thank you for that advice! These days people who work hard are becoming harder and harder to find, but I aim to be one of them. I will keep what you’ve said in mind. In fact, if it’s alright with you I’ll copy and paste it to my “quotes” note on my phone. :)
     
  35. Cascadian

    Cascadian Guide

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    I'd be honored.

    Edit:

    Hey, look! The young whippersnapper applied my advice and I didn't even notice!!
    (Crafty little bugger.)
     
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  36. jordanzwon1

    jordanzwon1 Husband, Father, Christ Follower Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I’m a sales director for a tech company. Get to travel a lot and see some seriously beautiful places I wouldn’t get to otherwise.

    How it relates to Bushcraft? It funds my gear and knife addiction.
     
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  37. chansta

    chansta keeper of the flame Supporter

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    I am a middle school special-education teacher. In order for me to decompress I have to be outdoors. It really has nothing to do with this hobby or lifestyle or whatever you want to call it. I am lucky enough to get weekends and some holidays and summers off.
     
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  38. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I learned something valuable about work .
    A good job pays the bills .
    A better job pays the bills and provides a bit more for living.
    Too much of a job burns out your life, and when you do have time for the living, your life is worn out.
    One's job should not be more important than his wife and kids TO SPEND TIME WITH THEM. If the job competes too heavily against your family it is time to find something else to pay bills with .
    A job does not need to be something you love to do , as a matter of fact if what you love is on DEMAND ,that love will wane to drudgery .
    A job is just a Job nothing more be it flipping burgers or designing sky scrapers, these things HAVE TO BE DONE ON TIME AND WITH PRECISION.
    Love on the other hand is not this demanding unless you want it to be at the moment .
    I love creating things be they wood or steel or plastic or other materials in concert .
    I won't go into all the different jobs I've had ,but most were mechanical , machinist ,production , manufacturing microscopically critical things .
    each job had value I learned from and added my experiences from previous jobs to . Some jobs were mundaying and some extremely challenging .
    I volunteered for search and rescue which put me out side in the mountains often enough in usually the worst of conditions . Any and all out door skills were added to during these events , though growing up and having a family we lived in the woods often enough. even off grid a while .
    Living off grid and on the desert may sound fun but your head needs to be on a swivel and your ears perked , predators of all sorts wait for one's weak moment .
    I loved that time and now that I'm retired could easily go back to it, but I have friend that I care for who is worth the sacrifice.
     
  39. Soilman

    Soilman Scout

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    I work for the Natural Resources Conservation Service as a Resource Soil Scientist doing wetland delineations and determinations. That requires knowledge about landscapes, soils, vegetation, hydrology, forestry, wildlife and agriculture. Maybe bushcraft is related in there somewhere.;)
     
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  40. will62

    will62 Guide

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    I work for a major grocery distributor as a system controller in an automated warehouse, making sure the right stuff is going out the door. No connection to bushcraft, it buys my stuff.
     
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  41. jasonandalysha

    jasonandalysha Texas Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    6181D821-9BDA-4FF4-B441-2EB40E969618.jpeg I now work on a Ranch. So I guess I’m a jack of all trades but a master of none. Do everything from running heavy equipment, checking/fixing fences, diagnostics on livestock, feeding/watering etc. so I guess it has some to do with Bushcraft in that, I’m almost always outside, making the best of the tools I have at hand.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019
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  42. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    I do private home daycare. The hours and paycheck are terrible, but it affords me all the time in the world to drag the kiddos around and teach them what I like while I learn and practice at the same time. :D
     
  43. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum Supporter

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    I’m a substitute teacher for now. I dunno. I guess getting by with as little as possible, learning to plan on the fly especially when you’re called last minute, and being prepared.
    Other than that it’s not a high paying job.
    I’ve got an interim position opening up soon. Hopefully, that’ll lead to full-time.
     
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  44. LongChinJon

    LongChinJon Supporter Supporter

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    There is some wisdom in the posts above.
    Some of the advice I've received over time:
    Never say "That isn't my job."
    Whatever you are doing, work at it with all your heart. If you are told to clean the bathroom, make it spotless.
    Work so your supervisor can evaluate you as someone who always does his best, no matter how menial the task.
    Good bosses promote good people, and bad bosses eventually go away.
    In the biblical book of Proverbs, it says, "Do you see a man skilled in his work? He will stand before kings; he will not stand before obscure men."
     
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  45. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    I'm a Software Architect for a hospital network in my area.

    You're job doesn't have to be related to your hobbies. Honestly that can be problematic sometimes. Just something to keep in mind. It just has to be some skill that you can make a living with in order to provide for yourself and your family.
     
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  46. FreudianSlip

    FreudianSlip Guide

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    I’m a licensed professional counselor or therapist if you will. It doesn’t have too much to do with bushcraft, although I like to analyze the thought processes people have on survival shows and consider how it helps their ability to survive. I enjoy bushcraft just because it’s fun and creates a nice connection to nature.
     
  47. BCWoodsman

    BCWoodsman Wet Woodsman

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    I am currently an expedited freight driver. It has no bearing at all on bushcraft.

    I get my dirt time after work and on my days off. I live fairly close to mountains and wilderness, so no issues accessing it. I am single and answer to none but my dog, who loves to go into the woods with me.

    Life could be worse :14:
     
  48. Woodpuppy

    Woodpuppy Tracker

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    Got my love of the outdoors as a kid, Dad worked for National Audubon, I grew up fishing in the FL Keys, and we camped on our road trips. Was a Boy Scout up through star. I was a bicycle mechanic, stagehand, cook, and fast food restaurant shift manager in college. That last gig prompted me to finish my BS... Geology field trips in undergrad college sucked me in. Now I’m a geologist and water well contractor. I’ve worked at the state geologic*l survey for 19 years. First week I was hired, they needed a warm body on the core drilling rig, and again I was hooked. I enjoyed weeks in the field core drilling, my field partner / mentor and I camped at state parks and cooked our meals on the camp fire or a Coleman stove. While I had done archery at camp, my field partner got me into traditional archery. We took bows with us in the field and practiced during breaks and in the evenings. Good times! He’s retired now and I do his job, but we still get together at local trad archery shoots.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019
  49. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

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    I used to be an engineer, sitting in front of a computer or a scope, with a phone stuck to the side of my face all day. It had nothing at all to do with bushcraft. Bushcraft is what kept me sane and healthy. That and cutting firewood, hiking, hunting, fishing, fixing fences, weekend construction work, and commuting to work on my bike.
     
  50. OiMcCoy

    OiMcCoy Scout

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    Solid advice.

    The point about passions fading was a huge concern of mine transitioning into being an outdoors professional. My last career (live sound for concerts) killed all my passion for seeing bands live. So moving into the outdoors world I often wondered if it would have the same effect. Three years in and I can say that my passion has only grown. There may be a time that I grow less find of certain aspects, but there are so many different ways to enjoy the outdoors, I think I can afford to risk it.
     

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