What do you use for transport?

Discussion in 'Paddling' started by Bushin in Az, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. Bushin in Az

    Bushin in Az Tracker

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    Wanted to hear peoples options on how they transport their canoe. I've got a car and a small suv.

    Looking at getting the thule portgage but don't have the cross bars for it yet and won't for awhile.

    Has anyone tried the foam block kits?
     
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  2. mjh

    mjh Supporter Supporter

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    Have used foam block kits, still have a set somewhere in the garage, they work if that's all yea got. Tighten everything down, two places in the mid area and the bow and stern. Have used the crossbars that came from the manufacture on our Subaru and Toyota. Have a space trailer that can haul two canoes on the crossbars ( have posted photos before). Just this week had delivered some hardware from Spring Creek Outfitters/Manufacturing, one crossbar and one hitch T bar so I can haul a canoe on my Jeep Wrangler ( I'll get some photo's up on after my first outing). More than one way to haul a canoe...
     
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  3. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    Either in the bed of the truck or one of my trailers.
     
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  4. grandpa p

    grandpa p Tracker

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    Have used the foam blocks on my old Jeep Liberty. They do work, but... I have a set of Trac One racks on my Sierra and they work well. Easily hauls 2 canoes and can haul a 3rd on top pf the 2.
     
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  5. FreeMe

    FreeMe Guide

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    Yeah, the foam blocks work (for a canoe), but as mjh states, bow and stern lines are a must. I've resorted to them temporarily, but wouldn't rely on them long. I've had several different vehicles hauling canoes. SUV's, mini-vans, and pickups with caps. All with rack systems. If you're going to use a canoe a lot, a good rack system is worth every penny.
     
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  6. 66drifter

    66drifter Guide

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    i've had excellent results w/ my QUICK N EASY system for over 40 years

    imageService.jpeg

    IMG_2918.jpg

    got the brackets at a kayak outfitter in Durango, Co(no longer in business) in the mid 70's and have simply changed out the cross bar to fit the vehicle-o-the-day

    still on the market today(quite a testimonial in today's economy)

    https://www.nrs.com/product/3200/quick-n-easy-car-top-racks-set

    i use mahogany for the cross bars since it is softer than some other species of hardwoods it takes the hit instead of my toys and it has weathered well over the years ;-)

    drilled & routed the ends and middle of each bar

    IMG_2921.jpg

    the only modification to the factory racks i have made was to change the slot headed screws for 1/4" x 20tpi hex head bolts w/ lock nuts

    IMG_2919.jpg

    canoes kayaks jon boats and stacks of lumber have all ridden on them over great distances at highway speeds in all kinds of weather w/o incident YET ;-)
     
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  7. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock Still going Supporter

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    image.jpg I know there kayaks. But same idea.
     
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  8. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Foam swimming noodles and rope.
     
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  9. LazyPK

    LazyPK Supporter Supporter

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    I use pool noodles, and some rope on the bow and stern, with two strap coming across the canoe. Works fine for me and I don’t have to spend a couple hundred on a rack. This is on a Suburban BTW.
     
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  10. Sawdustdave

    Sawdustdave Tracker

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    Got a Yakima settup for the cab of my pickup. Then I also use a "noodle" under the kayak at the rear. I've got a topper, so it's easy. Tie to the back hitch, a cord to each side in the back, across the bar on the cab, and tied to the front, hooking a structural support under the front. I can travel the speed limits with no probs.
     
  11. Sloany

    Sloany Supporter Supporter

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    Gobi Stealth Rack with various pool noodles.
    Picture was taken at the Pemaquid Light this past May.

    JEEP AT PEMAQUID.jpg
     
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  12. chickasaw_hunter

    chickasaw_hunter Scout

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    These are a little pricey, and have gone up since I bought mine about 10 years ago. Sure make loading easy, this is a stock image I got off the 'net, mine certainly has a little more wear on it. My wife and I got caught in a tornado traveling across Nebraska a few years ago and after it was all over and the truck stopped rocking in the wind, I found the trailer had been torn off my truck and only held in place by the safety change. The trailer was upside down and the canoe was full of a nice mixture of slush from the rain/hail. I had to cut the straps holding the canoe on the trailer, a canoe full of slush is pretty heavy and I couldn't right the trailer. So I cut it loose and got the trailer upright. Another traveler stopped and gave me a hand, thanks to him wherever he may be today. Lucky I carry extra straps. I did have to make a quick trip to the hardware store for supplies to repair some broken and twisted seats. I also got a little road rash on my RX canoe. Anyway this is a great way to carry a canoe and the trailer will break down for storage.
    [​IMG]
    It was so violent in my FJ that during that storm, I didn't even know the trailer had been ripped away. I had to replace the hitch coupling, it was twisted and mangled as a result of the storm. BTW what should have taken a full day on the river was only a three hour trip, that watershed got a super recharge out of that storm.
    That was my second and last trip down the Nibrorah river out of Valentine NE.
    But back on point, I really like this trailer, I can add a cartop carrier and I have a basket case that will mount low under the rails for more room. It is limited to mostly canoes and kayaks, but if you're into that, they work great. In the winter I can take it all apart and stash it around my garage to be out of the way.
     
  13. Haggis

    Haggis Guide

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    My old GMC, I bought new in 2005, and a canoe rack I spent a few minutes screwing together from scrap decking boards. It’ll carry two canoes nicely,,,

    The fine looking young man is my grandson, I was picking him up at Daughter #4’s house, for 4 days in the BWCA...

    5F537A56-92EC-4D44-8AF5-60677BA63AF0.jpeg
     
  14. DF Bob

    DF Bob Supporter Supporter

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    I have several systems that I use, and being a born pessimist, I am a belts and suspenders kind of guy (but really don't wear suspenders all that much, but they do have a place in the winter!) I use either cam locks with webbing, or 1" minimum webbing for the main ties. My boats are long (typ 17 ft) and I can get a good tie-in fore and aft so that it can't slide out of the tie-ins. I also occasionally use a soft rope in the 3/8 to 7/16 range for the primary tie down. Then, I tie the bow and stern painters, or an equivalent, to the front and rear of the vehicle. I know my knots fairly well, and also know that given enough time, sun, and vibration, the ratchet straps (especially those made "overseas" ) are likely to fail at some time, usually when we least want that. Canoes and kayaks are fairly hydrodynamic, and therefore quite aerodynamic. I like the very secure tie downs (no bungies, paracord, twine, duct tape, or whatever) because we often transport our boats at high speed on our vehicles. However, if and when we have to brake suddenly (traffic, moose and elk, carsick kids, etc) the lighter fastening fail miserable. The car that was doing 70 is now at 20, but the boat still wants to be doing 70. The canoe becomes a rocket, and the cartop is the launching pad. A personal injury attorney (yuk) would have a field day if the boat was tied on with stiff rubber bungies, ""WalMart" paracord (which isn't, just the mantle and fairy dust for innards), and your boat went through somebody's back window.

    On a less gruesome note, we hope to have our boat with us when we arrive at the destination. I have come across 5 (FIVE) road killed canoes and kayaks in my driving history. One was a very nice sea kayak. None survived to be worth picking up; a Coleman almost did but was wrapped around a tree and I have better boats. I think my royalex boats would survive, but sure would never be the same, wooden one would probably be kindling material.

    As for haulage, my primary is a "Rack-It" lumber carrier bolted to the bed of my truck, with a bed cap beneath the hauling area. I used slit ABS drain-vent-waste pipe to place over the interior bars to protect the gunnels from the steel. It works very well, and is almost tornado proof! I can easily carry one canoe, and with an adapter, two.

    Secondary vehicles are also older and have gutters, in one form or another. A Bronco II and Exploder have gutters front and rear, but on the B II especially, the rear is a placebo in regards to real USE of carrying loads. On pavement, it is probably fine but I tore it off on an admittedly rough road a long way from asphalt. The Exploder is a bit larger, but still I'm leery of it. I made "goalpost" mount that fits into the 2" receiver hitches on my rigs, and this lets the frame carry at least 40% of the load instead of the roof or gutters. I use Yakima towers and bars on the front gutters, and have had no issues with them.

    I also use the Quick & Easy system on my old Willys Overlander (your SUV's great grandfather!). Like 66drifter notes, these are still made, and are very versatile.

    All of the previous methods require the boat to be lifted to the racks. I don't (right now, WON"T get too political (but don't start me!)) but outside of some micro-areas, I am not totally convinced of man-caused "global warming" (except for weather modification efforts, but that is another story)). However, I am totally convinced that GRAVITY is increasing yearly, perhaps weekly. Virtually everything weighs more than it did a couple of decades ago, me included. Therefore, I am looking more into the option that chickasaw_hunter showed, a trailer. The one he is using is great, if you have the $$ and are willing to learn to back it up. Easy to load, etc; AND you can bolt a bed on it and haul all sorts of "stuff", including the toboggan and kitchen sink for winter camping, and to take to yard sales!! For those of us already with a trailer, a wooden rack framework, or more permanent metal framed one that bolts to the trailer is optional, and serves as a storage unit if you have more than one or three boats.

    Bob
     
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  15. clueless on the delaware

    clueless on the delaware Scout

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    whats the name of the manufacturer? i didnt see it in your post and a quick googling only shows things in australia.
     
  16. chickasaw_hunter

    chickasaw_hunter Scout

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    Clueless, when I bought mine, the company was called Rack and Roll, the trailer is still called that but has been bought out by Yakima cartop carriers.
    Bob, when I got mine, the paperwork with it recommended that you not back it. It's light, easy to couple and uncouple and I've never tried to back it. You get used to finding parking spots you can pull thru, I normally do that with my FJ anyway. FJ's are great vehicles but backing them is difficult because they have poor visibility, so I just try to avoid that whenever I can, so having a trailer back there I don't back is no big deal. I can only remember a couple of times I gotten myself into a situation where I had to unhook the trailer and move it around, I'm sure with a different vehicle it could be done, probably with a different driver also.

    How I got into the Rack & Roll was with a direct order from Upper Management. We were loading our boats at a very popular takeout spot at Lake Dillon (Colorado) the parking was tight. At the time I had a Ford F150 with a rack. The truck sat pretty high and Upper Management had trouble reaching that high. To make the story a little shorter, one of my canoes became airborne, parked next to us was a brand new shiny red car, still had the paper tags on it. Nothing was hurt or damaged but there was a lot of drama. And like Bob said above, gravity is increasing. Upper management determined right there right then that she would not be involved in loading canoes onto the tops of any vehicles anymore, volia I was authorized a pricey rack & roll. It is designed to work with anything Yakima and will haul a payload of up to 400 lbs. I've had it on road trips and it worked great. Well with the exception of its performance in tornados, but I decided that, like backing, I will just avoid those as much as possible in the future.
     
  17. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

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    IMG_0287.JPG Built a ten ft platform on this Caulkins trailer with a double bunk. Hauls the mail.
     
  18. swissarmy67

    swissarmy67 Scout

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    I used to use foam blocks.

    But after 2 times having the wife help me unload the 100lb Alumacraft off the roof of the Jeep she ordered me to buy a trailer. :59:
     
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  19. Bushin in Az

    Bushin in Az Tracker

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    Thanks for the replies and ideas everyone.
     
  20. Ahnkochee

    Ahnkochee Bushmaster

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    I cheat, I own a pickup truck with an aluminum rack. I mostly haul my 11' canoe or 10' kayak so I usually just toss in the bed and let the rest hang out. I haven't tried racking my 15'6 125lb. dory yet, that should be fun...
     
  21. houstondiscdog

    houstondiscdog Carpe Canem

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    I have used the foam blocks alone (granted with a kayak) and recently purchased this Malone roof rack system to use with the blocks. Very secure and that's a 92 pound kayak. Plus, the roof rack is easily removable when I'm not hauling.

    IMG_0068.jpg
     
  22. chansta

    chansta keeper of the flame Supporter

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    Bars with truckers hitch for the middle...
    T bar in the back For loading and unloading is also secured with a truckers hitch in the back. I take about 15 feet of rope and run it through the handle with A larks head knot, Then run both ends underneath the hitch and secure with truckers hitches.

    Hood straps for the front also using truckers hitches.
     
  23. DF Bob

    DF Bob Supporter Supporter

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    Tie-down update: One of the projects I am working, to get to it involves driving across about 30 miles of Highway 49, a two-lane, moderate speed (55MPH posted), fairly curvy road that goes between two of the classic raft and kayak rivers in the West. There is a combination of commercial rafters and private kayakers, with a moderate mix of canoeists driving along this stretch of road, and two adjacent major highways that lead to camping and canoe areas. Since this thread began, maybe a week or two age, I started counting the road-kill ratchet straps (since I tend to loathe them). So far, 6. I have also tried to observe the methods of tie-in on the various boats, and the majority are using the ratchet straps, with the private canoe and kayakers using everything from rubber bungies, twine (and prayer>?) to rope (me!) but also with what a rough estimate is more than 50% using ratchets. Let's assume that not all the RKR's (road killed ratchets) are from boats or rafts, but a conservative assumption in this location might be 33 percent involve watercraft, and the rest, maybe another 33 percent involve camp gear of some type. I have not stopped to examine the RKR's, so don't know if their failure is due to mechanical failure, operator error, failure to re-examine the tie-in after a few miles, or other modes. It really is somewhat irrelevant, somewhere along the line there are folks traveling with potentially partially secured loads. What I do know is there haven't been any good stuff found (GSF?) as a consequence, but perhaps t he GSF was either picked up after an unplanned off-loading, others beat me to the GSF, or the GS exiting the transit vehicle will occur outside my commute. But, bottom line up front, there appears to be a high failure rate of ratchet straps. I have not noticed rope, nor cam straps (which tend to be used by the raft folks, with a mix of ratchets), nor broken bungies. I will continue this informal "survey" but for those using ratchet straps, this may be some good info - check your installations, and recheck after a few miles. If you don't, I hope to follow behind looking for more GSF. LOL.

    Been working brutal hours on various projects, so only have time to check this site once in a while. Maybe it helps keep me grounded but what a place to have to come to looking for normalcy. haha, have a good night.

    Bob
     
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  24. DF Bob

    DF Bob Supporter Supporter

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    OutnBackers rowing rig is what brought me to this site. Previous, I have been thinking up ways to carry my herd of canoes on my flatbed 20 foot trailer, and working on a similar set up to his picture above. Doggone it, don't come up with any more ideas right now, wait until winter so I will have time to make similar. LOL. thanks though, your rowing rig is great and the adaptability between relatively svelte and clunky boats is suburb, thanks for posting it.

    Bob
     
  25. DF Bob

    DF Bob Supporter Supporter

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    And before I take a whippin' from the purists, about 60 to 80 percent of the time I stand and either pole or double kayak paddle (standing) with a modified pole, maybe 10 percent I paddle heeled over, close to 10 percent conventional paddle, and probably less than 5 percent rowing, BUT, when the wind is up, a wide medium tall guy is a medium wide sail, I haven't learned to tack, and the first rule of canoes and wind is you paddle OUT into the wind, and then paddle BACK into the wind. Sometimes, it's just nice to sit down, row and make efficient time. With a moderate load-out of camp gear, this goes double.
     
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  26. DF Bob

    DF Bob Supporter Supporter

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    Any of the short wheel base rigs are a pain to back up, especially with a short-coupled trailer, and good or poor visibility. So I too look for pull-through parking whenever pulling trailers. I don't (yet) trailer the boats, but that gravity thing and a few times that I would like to buy back 5 to 10 seconds of poor judgement, are making the high racks more interesting. Since airborne canoes have a glide path similar to an F4 Phantom, or worse, I tend to not try to load/unload in the wind. My "help", what little I get, is pretty short and light, and the Mary Poppins vision of her and the canoe disappearing in the air is too much to handle. The canoe might get damaged. LOL.
     
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  27. grandpa p

    grandpa p Tracker

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    The problem with ratchet straps is that there are way too many cheap ones available and too many people won't spend the $$$ for the good ones. Similarly, same can be said for cam buckle straps. I have had cheap straps of both versions that have failed long before the much older quality straps.

    You can't always blame the straps for failure. Idiots are everywhere.
     
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  28. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    All my methods of transport

    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
  29. BeardedCanoeMan

    BeardedCanoeMan Tinder Gatherer

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    Yknpdlr: I see you are from the Adirondacks. I am headed up there this week. I live west of Rochester. I was wondering how long that one canoe is: 20', 24'?
    Reminds me of a war canoe in which 6 or so people paddle it.
     
  30. FreeMe

    FreeMe Guide

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    That about covers it!
     
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  31. Bad Little Falls

    Bad Little Falls Guide

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    That long grey canoe looks like it needs two suburbans to carry it! Gosh! that's a long canoe.
     
  32. backlasher

    backlasher Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I carry my kayak in the bed of my truck with a Harbor Freight bed extender. I've carried kayaks on my car with pool noodles instead of foam blocks and I tied the front of the kayak to the front bumper in addition to other ropes.
     
  33. Portage_Monster

    Portage_Monster Scout

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    I think I posted this somewhere else too, but this is my rednecked $200 craigslist boat trailer that I put beams on for hauling canoes. It's less of a fight than getting a boat on a roof and I can haul a lot of them when need be.
    Canoe Rack.jpg
     
  34. Flint_2016

    Flint_2016 Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Foam blocks and ratchet style tightening straps is all I use to secure my 12' kayak to my Jeep Patriot's roof.So far so good .Sorry the photos couldnt be better,my crappy camera didnt do it justice.Before I go on a longer trip I need to replace the ropes.That's the last thing I need while going 65 mph on the highway and they go on me .
    DSCN8301.JPG
    DSCN8302.JPG
     
  35. tomcfitz

    tomcfitz Supporter Supporter

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    Regarding the thule crossbars: go to the REI garage sales. I got a set of used bars and feet for $100, then bought the fit kit for my golf full price. But I still saved a couple hundred bucks. I also got 60" bars, and had to modify the rear one to get it to fit. But that's not too bad.

    Every single time I've gone to a garage sale they've had a ton of roof rack stuff.
     
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