What do you use your axes for and what sizes?

Discussion in 'Axe Mob' started by batmanacw, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. batmanacw

    batmanacw Guide

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    Right now I have:
    6 Hawks
    4 Half Hatchets
    2 Hewing axes
    25 Hatchets
    18 Short Pack Axes (18" to 20.5")
    15 Pack Axes (23" to 24")
    16 3/4 Axes or Boy's Axes (25" to 28")
    16 Full Size Axes of various lengths and weights.

    15% of my axes are full size (3lbs or heavier)

    30% of my axes have a hatchet handle of some sort


    80% of all my axe usage fits into the pack axe or boy's axe range. Mostly woods bumming and taking care of trees around home and camping.

    10% goes to hatchets and hawks and the other 10% goes to full size axes.

    How do you rate your usage? What size range do you tend to use the most? What type of usage?
     
    Muleman77 likes this.
  2. Muleman77

    Muleman77 Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    I'm almost the opposite stats. The majority of my use is bucking, trailwork, splitting firewood, felling and chainsaw work. We have a lot of pretty big timber here to deal with. I use a full size axe 80% of the time.

    I've got a dozen full size on short strait hafts, and 40 other full size singles and doubles mostly 32-36" with a few exceptions.

    4 pulaskis I use a fair amount

    15 boys axes and cruisers I use quite a bit for camping and light chores. That's about the smallest axe I really like.

    3 of what would be called "pack axe" size, and a bunch of hatchets and hawks. I really don't use these a lot.
     
  3. Sticks N' Stones

    Sticks N' Stones Scout

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    I mainly have heavy weight axes, and a one main 3/4 one. Three 3.5 pounders, Hults bruk felling axe 30" handle, Connecticut 27" handle main firewood processing axe, and old Plumb permabond double bit 36" handle best round splitter I have, the handle may give out soon, I might invest in one of those abomination maul collars. Although I use the flick, the handle got beat up by my father as a kid cuz' he didn't know the flick. My main axe is my 2.5 pound Homestead Cruiser DB 28" handle. I use for trail clearing, occasional firewood processing or showing off a well tuned axe, camping trips, carpentry, carving, takes role of boy's axe and carpenter's hatchet. During warm months, I use it everyday, I don't like using it in winter as I'm scared I'll chip the blades as they're so keen, the grubbing edge is like a real good axe, the chopping edge is more like a keen knife edge with mirror polish of which I rarely use that side for heavy chopping nowadays. I keep em' sharp with Japanese waterstone pucks I make, buy cheap stone, cut it into quarters with crappy saw.
     
  4. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Full sized, I mainly use these if I have some really stubborn wood to split (maul would be a better tool, meh) or if I simply feel like using one. They work great so no reason not to. I don't fell trees or buck large trees. I don't live on a large piece of land or maintain any trail systems.

    [​IMG]Plumb Rockaway Chop by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Boys axe, this is really all the axe I need 99.99999% of the time. Generally used for bucking and splitting wood I pick up from around the neighborhood and use for my fire pit or carving projects and so on.

    [​IMG]Woodpile Workout by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Camp axe, basically a long handled hatchet. I use this at camp for bucking and splitting smaller dead stands and dead falls. Also for camp carving projects, and for splitting out kindling to start fires. For whatever reason it's a controversial size, but one I find very handy for Bushcraft related tasks and trips. This is also the size I grab for nights around the fire pit at home to split kindling or just split down some wood further for tbe fire (I tend to maintain small fires).

    [​IMG]Camp Axe by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Hand axe, my favorite axe for carving projects is in this category. Aside from that use it's not my favorite or most used to be honest. For carving however the shorter handle is welcomed.

    [​IMG]BSA National Side by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    The mini hand axe. Yet another controversial size, a tiny little hatchet that packs as light as a knife. Here pictured at a mountain top camp where it was used to buck small diameter deadfall and dead stands for maintaining a small cooking fire. No need for a saw or baton, just the little 12oz hatchet (8 oz head)

    [​IMG]Mini Hatchet fire by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    The same applies to all of these tools. They all have their limits. They all work wonders within their limits. I'm not going to haul a 5 lbs axe up a mountain while already packing in two sleeping bags, two mats, and food for two. And I'm not going to split 1' diameter rounds with my 12oz hatchet regardless of how straight the grain is. Both could be done, but why? Variety is the spice of life.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018
  5. Chazzle

    Chazzle Wandering Teacher Supporter

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    3.5 lb Vaughn railroad axe - cutting apart small branches and splitting wood for the fire pit.
    1.5 lb Helko Ranger hatchet - preparing kindling.
    French Colonial pattern tomahawk - scalping squirrels who steal my tomatoes.
     
  6. montanero

    montanero Tracker

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    Camp hatchet and boy's axe for yard work and prepping firewood. Rigging hatchet hangs around the shop and very rarely gets used for minor tasks. Old Estwing 12 incher also hangs around the shop and may end up in the car tool box for emergency/ camping use.
     

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