What is your total pack weight

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by tomme boy, May 3, 2016.

  1. exup

    exup Quit your job and start living! Supporter

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    Nice mtwarden!! Keep sul alive! Haha

    I saw that load out video from Jupiter, he's using the palante cuben pack I'm waiting oh so patiently for.
     
  2. CaliforniaCanuck

    CaliforniaCanuck Guide

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    That's impressive!

    What do you do for food storage during the night?
     
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  3. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    if you're talking to me- I have a very small cuben sack that stores 50' of slick dyneema line w/ a mini carabiner and ~ 10 liter sack for the food- a little over 1.5 ounces total
     
  4. Florida Bullfrog

    Florida Bullfrog Tracker

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    My go-to bag right now weighs 24lbs, not including water but including camera gear and recharging equipment. If I leave the electronics, its probably closer to 20lbs. That includes a tent, Thermarest, a chair, my sheath knife (which properly wouldn't really be a part of my bag's weight because I'd be wearing it) and a body sock (which is all I need for cool but not cold nights). I don't carry water with me except for what I might want to have for walking in. I could save more weight by leaving the chair, switching the tent for a poncho, and leaving my hatchet and just rely on my sheath knife.

    If I'm going out on a social trip where we'll be doing a lot of cooking, I'll switch to a larger bag and heavier loadout. Possibly also a heavier tent. Including a small, soft cooler with ice and meat and maybe a few soft drinks, I can keep it around 35-40lbs. Since I've lost weight, anything up to 40lbs feels comfortable with any of my bags.
     
  5. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Tracker

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    My weight for a 2 day trip in the spring would varies widely with what I want to do that weekend. If Im gonna cover 30 miles its gotta be under 20 lbs including consumables, even if it means leaving all my neat little toys at home, but if I'm only gonna go 4-5 miles lol I might just tote 45 lbs lol. And you never know, I might go ultralight with a 14 lb base weight to allow me to carry a 6 pack cooler full of ice and a 18 pack of wha....
    You don't need a lot of equipment to just go outside and enjoy nature, so the load and the weight really varies with your itinerary.
    Stay warm, dry, and fed.
     
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  6. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Scout

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    28 to 30 lbs, but this is with some toys.
    Rainfly 6x8'
    Painters plastic ground sheet 4'x6.5'
    Solite alcohol stove 6oz of fuel
    mess kit and water bottle
    Fak
    Fire kit with tinder
    Cooking spices
    Sewing kit
    Cordage and pegs
    Multi tool and a few other tools * leather gloves
    A scarf and bug net
    Compass and phone
    *Mss bivy
    patrol bag
    *Folding solar charger
    Head lamp
    Kellam fang knife
    *Cs trail hawk
    *Bow and arrows or 44 mag (I have not wieghed either of these items though)
    Food water
    I need a sleeping pad currently only have one that is destroyed

    * = Pretty optional
     
  7. Chief55

    Chief55 Scout

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    Me to, I want to cut down to around 20lbs.
     
  8. Isnalawica

    Isnalawica Scout

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    Great thread!
    Hiking or bush-crafting?
    My basic kit weighs 12 lbs (14 in winter). that does not include spare clothing, food and water (but does include water filter). This includes a super comfortable but heavy bag (4 lbs). I think I could save 2 lbs on the bag but am not willing to sacrifice comfort (maybe Osprey exos?)
    For hiking, I will add 1 to 4 lbs of clothing (depends on the season), 4 lbs of water and 1 1/2 lbs of food per day. As an example, I would carry around 24 lbs for a 4 day summer trip in the mountains (at 6000 to 9000ft elevation).
    Bush-crafting is an other story... I then carry all my toys and, last time, my pack weighted around 50 lbs...
     
  9. Smokey Radley

    Smokey Radley Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    For a week long backpacking trip in the winter I can keep it just under 40lbs, no major luxury left behind. For less then a mile in bushcrafting focus trip I've gone up to 70lbs. (cast iron skillet, axe, fresh food, etc.)
     
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  10. Gunnarsson

    Gunnarsson Tracker

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    My winter-setup for hiking is 24lbs without water & food. For bushcrafting it´s more like 28-29lbs.
     
  11. Lazy J

    Lazy J Tracker

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    35lbs of which 10lbs is water if I'm going up into the mountains where the water sources are very unreliable. Always kinda jealous of people who can get away with carry a minimum amount of water because you can get it from a reliable water source.

    Then again I rarely have to put up with rain when out hiking!
     
  12. jaydendyck1

    jaydendyck1 Scout

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    I just loaded my bag up not too long ago and with an empty water bottle and no food im at 15 lbs. My sleeping bag is kind of big and heavy though id like to get something a little lighter eventually.
     
  13. Scratchthejeepguy

    Scratchthejeepguy Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Just packed up my pack for a 3 day 2 nighter and it weighed 24 pounds, with food and clothes but no water. Added 4 pounds to fill up my 2 Nalgene bottles.

    This is a great thread! I'll have to see where I can cut some weight...
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2017
  14. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Tracker

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    How destroyed is that sleeping pad? In walmart, in the hardware section with the many kinds of duck tape their is a clear repair tape that is quite similar to "tenacious tape". While it may genuinely be time to replace the pad, maybe you can squeeze a little more use out of it while you're scraping up the money.
     
  15. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Scout

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    Animal chewed on...Bad boy
     
  16. wooly bugger

    wooly bugger I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees.

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    I primarily do overnighters these days. Here is my current pack list for this spring. All total weights include consumables (lunch, dinner, breakfast plus water) and provides for the availability of a water source (I filter for refills).

    BTW, you guys that are using Nalgenes do realize they weigh over 6 oz empty, right? Three empty Nalgenes is over a pound alone.

    Spring to Fall mild weather, lows in the 45*>
    Eagle Creek Ready Go Pack 30L (1830 cu in) – 19 oz
    ENO DN Hammock/Atlas Straps – 32 oz
    GCI Pack Stool – 16 oz
    67 oz

    SnugPak Jungle Bag (45*/36*) – 31 oz
    Inflatable pillow – 2 oz
    SOL Escape Lite Bivy – 6 oz
    39 oz

    Titanium Fork/spoon, fire fork – 3 oz
    Toaks 750ml, Esbit mini/wind screen, fuel, clean kit, aluminum nest mug – 11 oz
    14 oz

    Sven Saw – 11 oz
    FAK/Fire kit – 12 oz
    Hygiene – 5 oz
    Flashlight/headlamp – 10 oz
    Misc Kit (glow stick, knife sharpener, hank, cordage) – 10 oz
    48 oz

    Sawyer mini-squeeze Filter – 5 oz
    .5L Platypus– 20 oz
    1L Platypus– 33 oz
    1L Platy empty – 1 oz
    59 oz

    Ramen/Chicken Bag – 10 oz
    Hotdogs – 14 oz
    Oatmeal – 4 oz
    Tea/coffee – 1 oz
    Sunflower Seeds – 6 oz
    Seasoning – 2 oz
    37 oz

    Socks – 5 oz

    Total Weight: 269 oz / 17 lbs
     
  17. Scratchthejeepguy

    Scratchthejeepguy Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Ok, so after reading through this whole thread, it looks like I'm "kind of" in the ball park on weight with some of you, but I thought I could make some improvements... so I dug into it a little more, took some pics, did some more weighing, and am now looking for advice.
    Here's a pic of my full pack... with food, clothes, empty water bottles, and it weighs exactly 23.8 pounds:
    [​IMG]


    Here's everything inside it:
    [​IMG]
    Here's the list starting from the top left side:
    Sleeping bag.
    Klymit Static V Luxe leeping pad.
    REI Dash 2 tent with footprint.
    BCUSA Silnylon Poncho tarp.
    Dry bag of spare clothes.
    Gloves.
    Headlamp.
    Blue foam pad.
    In the middle I have a GSI SS cup, , a fish hook spreader, and spork, that goes in the denim sack they're setting on.
    Bottom center is a black mesh bag containing: a PSK, 50' of paracord, 6x1/2" firesteel, stick of fat wood, toothbrush/paste, bug spray, hook knife, Thermacell, Fiskars folding saw.
    Bob Dustrude folding buck saw.
    SS Nalgene bottle.
    Plastic Nalgene bottle
    Black mesh bag containing my food and spices.

    Yes, I know there's no knife in there, but that'll be on my belt anyways. I also would like to add more first aid than what's in my PSK.

    My Pack alone weighs just under 4.0 pounds (62.4 oz) I really like how it "fillets" open (I think that's what it's called... anyone?) is pretty durable, has lots of internal pockets and storage, but that's what makes it heavy.
    My sleeping bag, in its sack weighs 2.2 pounds.
    My tent in its sack with footprint, poles and stakes weighs 3.6 pounds.
    My sleeping pad in its sack weighs 1.8 pounds.
    My clothes in a dry bag weighs 2.4 pounds. (1 extra pair of: pants, 1 thermal shirt, 1 pair of socks, 1 pair of underoos)

    When I took all my stuff out of their 8 sacks, the 8 sacks alone weighed exactly 1 pound.

    Then I tried a new lighter pack. This was a gift but is the lightest pack I own. I've never used it as I don't really think it's very good quality, but it's lightweight and I wanted to see if my stuff would fit in a pack this size. It's a Jansport Katadhin 40L. It weighs just under 2 pounds (27.3 oz)

    I really like my other pack since I know it's more durable, has tons of internal pockets to organize stuff, (even though I never use even half of those pockets) and I really like how I can completely "fillet" open up the pack and see exactly where and what is in the pack. But I also think that using a pack like a stuff sack, is probably a more efficient and lighter way to go. Anyone have any thoughts on that...?


    So I removed all 8 stuff sacks, then filled the new pack with everything from the first picture and it weighed 19.6 pounds with no water, that's a savings of 4.2 pounds, and there was extra room in the pack!
    [​IMG]

    My plans were to save more weight by:
    Removing the buck saw.
    Going with a lighter pair of pants.
    Only bringing one lid for my cook kit.
    Getting rid of the Thermacell.
    Having a smaller blade protector for the hook knife.
    Going with a smaller bottle of bug spray.
    Using a smaller firesteel.
    Removing the plastic toothbrush bag.
    Losing the canned chicken and going with something else.
    Using salt and pepper packets instead of the plastic holder.

    When I did these changes, my total packed weight went down to 17.2 pounds!

    Some things I could still save weight with, but probably won't do is:
    Getting a smaller sleeping pad.
    Not bringing the SS Nalgene bottle.
    Using only one SS cup.
    Not bringing the hook knife

    I may end up going with titanium cups and lids if I can find the same sizes, and I'll probably look for a better quality 2 pound pack of the same size.

    I guess it's not like I'm starting to go ultralight backpacking... Just trying to save some weight when camping.
    I'm also very open to any gear suggestions...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 27, 2017
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  18. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    some suggestions, some you've already stated- just confirming your suggestions :)

    one saw should be plenty- if it's an area where you need to process big wood, bring the buck saw, if not, bring the folding saw- don't bring both

    ditto on the pots- one pot of the appropriate size- titanium saves some weight, but just bringing one will save you more

    you are carrying a metal pot, no need for a steel nalgene- I like a steel Nalgene when it serves double duty as pot AND water carrier, if I'm carrying a pot- lots of lighter choices for carrying water- I like Platypus bottles- I have some that are going on 10 years+ so despite their light weight, they are plenty tough

    clothing- no need for extra pants or underwear; use merino for underwear and you'll find they are good for several days- if you're out longer- wash them :)

    no need for a can of bug repellent- get wipes or a small bottle- just enough for the trip, no more

    you have a shelter (tent), some cordage can come in handy- 50' is way too much

    canned goods are heavy :)
     
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  19. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Tracker

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    If you check the weather, and you know there won't be rain. You can leave the tent at home. I wouldn't feel good recommending a rainy trip with a poncho/tarp as raingear/shelter, I've done it and can confirm the wetness lol.

    But if you think it wont rain (75-90% chance no rain), sleeping near the fire under the stars is awesome,
    You can pitch a small poncho shelter low, about 15 feet away from the fire just in case you wake up to a small isolated drizzle.
     
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  20. wooly bugger

    wooly bugger I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees.

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    I'm heading out for an overnighter (low of 25*) and I figured that I would post my pack list. Total weight including pack, gear, food, and water is 388 oz / 24.3 lbs. It could certainly be much lighter but I plan on an exceedingly comfortable night, eating well, with friends. :dblthumb:

    Gregory Serrac 45L Pack (2746 cu in) – 58 oz
    ENO DN Hammock/Atlas Straps – 32 oz
    GCI Stool – 16 oz
    Hammock Underquilt (40*) – 25 oz
    SnugPak Square Foot Lite bag (32*/18*) – 64 oz
    Pack Pillow – 8 oz
    SOL Escape Bivy (66*) – 8 oz
    Body Warmers – 6 oz
    Titanium Fork/spoon (1 oz), fire fork – 3 oz
    Toaks, Esbit mini/screen, fuel, aluminum nesting mug – 11 oz
    Sven Saw – 11 oz
    Fire/FAK – 11 oz
    Hygiene – 5 oz
    Flashlight/headlamp – 10 oz
    Misc Kit (knife sharpener, thermometer, hank, cordage) – 6 oz
    Sawyer squeeze bottle 34 oz – 6 oz
    .5L – 20 oz
    1L Platypus (wine) – 33 oz
    Ramen – 4 oz
    Brats – 14 oz
    Oatmeal – 4 oz
    Tea/coffee – 1 oz
    Sunflower seeds – 7 oz
    Thermals, gloves, watch cap – 25 oz
     
  21. caoutdoorsman

    caoutdoorsman Scout

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    Pack is down to ~15lb without water, ~19lb with water.

    I've dropped 30 lbs since the last post in this thread and no longer sweat as bad from exertion, so 1/2 gallon per day is adequate.

    I'll edit this post to include a gear list and accurate pack weight once my scale gets here in the mail.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
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  22. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    I tried to get it to show in a table but failed miserably :-(

    Item Name - weight in oz
    NeoAir Venture - 21.8
    NatureHike Cloud Up II - 47
    Sleeping Bag Sierra Designs - 34.1
    Stove - 0.4
    Pot Lifter - 1.3
    Mini bic - 0.4
    pot/windscreen - 4
    bowl - 0.6
    fuel bottle - 0.4
    water bottle - 1.4
    water bags/gravity strap - 3.1
    filter - 1.7
    spork - 0.5
    food bag - 1.3
    bear bag line kit - 1.4
    toothbrush/toothpaste - 1.1
    toilet bag - 6.02
    toilet trowel - 1.3
    map - 0.6
    compass - 0.8
    headlamp strap - 0.4
    FAK/Repair kit - 5.6
    down jacket - 10.1
    Poncho/guy lines - 7
    Flash 45 Backpack - 36

    So we got a new kitchen scale and of course that ment I needed to weigh all of my gear to see where things were at. I didn't break things down as far as I could have for example my poncho includes guy lines and a stuff sack. In the end I got a total of 188.32 oz or 11.77 lbs after plugging it into a Spreadsheet if my calculations are correct.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
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  23. Scratchthejeepguy

    Scratchthejeepguy Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Ive been doing a lot of research and watching a lot of YT videos lately on this subject... From what I've found, they consider a "base weight" is everything minus consumables (food, water, and cooking fuel) does that sound correct?

    If that's true, (with ideas from here...) I've now got my base weight down to 14.4 pounds for a 3 day, 2 nighter. I'm starting to have fun with this!
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
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  24. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Yup that would be your base weight. Coming in under 15 lbs your doing pretty well. That would put you in the light weight Backpacking category I believe.
     
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  25. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ that's correct

    they use that term as often fuel, water, food varies so much depending on time of year, location, length of trip etc

    they typically will also list total pack weight which includes all the above, and often "skin out weight" which includes total pack weight and weight of items worn (clothing, etc) and carried (trekking poles, etc)
     
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  26. tramp_trade

    tramp_trade Wet Woodsman

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    My current day carry is about 14 lbs before water. Maybe 5lbs of water on a warm day as I carry for myself and my dogs. On an over-nighter, I'm in the 30lb range.
     
  27. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    it all depends on season and what i'm doing. right now with my current equipment i can get my base weight right at 10lbs, when i upgrade my shelter i'll be able to go sub 10lbs base weight. my last true hike (21 miles) i was carrying around 25lbs, the previous trip before that was 35-40lbs and i said no thanks unless i have too!
     
  28. Jayson

    Jayson Scout

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    Just in the process of prepping for a 4 day trip. Preparing for wet weather and temps down to 15 or 20°F or -7 to -10°C.
    Hammocking without food water and fuel. 12LB food and fuel will add 1.5LBish per day so hoping for total trailhead weight around 18 to 20 LB.
     
  29. hidden_lion

    hidden_lion Scout

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    you should get some dog packs and have them carry their own food and water for the trip....instant weight savings
    Maybe they should make doggy camel backs, then they could hydrate on the go like their people
     
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  30. EyeOfTheHawk

    EyeOfTheHawk Supporter Supporter

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    23 lbs before food and water. A little heavy, but my pack weighs 6 lbs. But its comfort factor "outweighs" its poundage. Shelter comes in around 2.5 lbs. Sleeping bag is my main area I could improve at over 4lbs, but I need a long/xl size, so it is always going to be heavier than most people. So thats 13lbs for my big 3. There are some areas I could save seom serious ounces, I know. I carry a big knife, and my cook kit weighs almost 2 lbs. But I love those pieces of my kit, and I dont want to change them really. Alot of this stuff is new gear for me, and I will be getting out next week to dial in this iteration of my kit. But I am happier than ever with my loadout.

    DSC_0162.JPG DSC_0165.JPG
     
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  31. ouroboros

    ouroboros Tracker

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    Just got home from an overnighter near Springer Mountain, GA. I was at 22.5 lbs with 2 liters of water and 2 days worth of food... and a full bottle of Thor's Well wine in a stainless steel water bottle. Maybe forgetting a few small things...

    Osprey Exos 48
    Little Shop of Hammocks Warrior 11'
    Hammock Gear Cuben Fiber Tarp w/ Lash-It guylines, Dutchware hardware
    Hammock Gear 20 degree Phoenix Underquilt
    Enlightened Equipment Revolution 20 Top Quilt
    Fjallraven Keb Hooded Jacket (G-loft insulation, synthetic similar to down)
    Bergans Super Lett Waterproof/Windproof Jacket
    Fallkniven F1
    Bahco Laplander
    Small DIY titanium alcohol stove and 2oz denatured alcohol fuel
    Snow Peak Trek 900 Titanium Cook Set
    Toaks Titanium Cup
    Light My Fire Titanium Fork/Spoon
    Small Cabela's First Aid Kit
    Black Diamond Head Lamp (forget the model)
    Small Hygiene Kit, 1 Blue Surgical Rag (maybe 12x18")
    Small Firestarting Kit (fatwood, a couple Coghlan's sticks, Swedish Firesteel, BIC)
    Dutchwaregear Folding Sit Pad
    Dutchwaregear Backpack Rain Cover
    Platypus Big Zip 3L Bladder
    Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter + 1 Sawyer Water Bag
    Unknown Brand SS Water Bottle 32oz
    Solar/USB Phone Charger
    Change of socks, underwear, merino wool shirt
    25' of Lash It cordage w/ small S-biner (bear bag line)

    I didn't include the weight of the clothes I was wearing. That would be Marmot Arch Rock pants, Smartwool PHD Ultralight shirt, Smartwool Boxers, Darn Tough socks, Alico Summit Light boots, REI mesh/nylon baseball hat.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
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  32. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

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    Hah and Im patting myself on the back for hitting 7lbs. Unreal man, youre a champion for sure. Mimicking some of my recent choices after checking your load out, out. Specifically your pack. Which in turn made me sell my superfly and buy a 4.7oz cuben hex.. snowball effect. But Im loving the vest pack, especially with such a light load.
     
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  33. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

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    Great list for people who think you need heavy weight because you need luxury. Thats a damn luxurious setup right there for a great carry weight. You have the cuben hex?
     
  34. WildMedGuru

    WildMedGuru Scout

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    Car camping -(smiles ear to ear) - don't even ask weight.............talking multiple tools, dutch ovens, etc.......{thew this topic in for fun}

    True bushcraft specific pack.....some where in the 35-50 range if just going out to play (tool heavy) / limited distance / sometimes overnight
    -but I really enjoy nostalgia of leather, canvas and stainless steel, so the weight get out of hand quickly

    Day hikes - I'd say sub 15 lbs (ultralight only gear)

    Overnighter to weekender ( rarely go more than a few nights (2-3) in a row anymore, due to life, schedules, etc...)
    -pack weight varies greatly, depending on gear selection and or weather
     
  35. ouroboros

    ouroboros Tracker

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    Yeah, the cuben hex, no doors, just the standard model.

    I figured I'd use it until I have a night where I feel the need for doors (so far not yet, and been in some good rain/wind/cold) ... and if I ever do decide I want doors, I'll order 1 or maybe 2 Cuben Grizz Beaks from 2QzQ that are made to fit the HG Cuben Hex Tarp.
     
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  36. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

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    Thats my thought, just picked up the same tarp and moved my superfly. Tp your point if theres ever s chance of crap weather takr a beak or detatchable door
     
  37. Pierre

    Pierre Tracker

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    I am about the same. I typically have 25-35lbs of stuff with food plus a gallon of water. I am in northern wisconsin so even in July you pack for 40s at night.
    I have a good wilderness first aid setup. Good food, chair hammock setup or tent setup, 6 inch blade knife, etc. i save weight by having good pieces of gear.
    I drink lots of water. I have a big tarp 1.5lbs so I can really get comfy under it in bad weather.
    Full Titanium mess kit saves lots of weight.

    Gram weinying does not work in northern wi and mi unless you are really fit or moving fast.
     
  38. DixiePreparedness

    DixiePreparedness Scout

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    What is carried depends on the trip and location, and what I am hoping to accomplish.
    Usually 25 to 30 pounds with all my gear, food, water, cameras, and my trip "task" supplies.

    Since we "bushcraft", the "ultralight" stuff is out for most trips.

    Ultralight backpacking and Bushcrafting are two totally different animals.
    It is like comparing a smart car to an 18 wheeler for transportation.
     
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  39. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Tracker

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    Yeah thermarest neoair and a tarp is what I do.
    I don't really count grams hard, but I paid a lot of attention to the UL hikers and thru-hikers when choosing my gear. I'm using a bigger tarp and a larger neoair and a 2.2 pound synthetic bag than one of them would pick, because they were worth the weight to me. But the basic platform is weight efficient enough to allow the larger heavier items.
    If I was running a tent or a hammock setup I would have to compromise on space, or weight, or money, or something.

    My weight is usually about 18-25 pounds.
    18 pounds with trekking poles and a good fitting pack, pretty much feels weightless like a dayhike, anything over that weight is pretty much a personal consent to additional manual labor.
    I could get it down to 12, but I like having stuff and it isn't that heavy as long as its under 35, otherwise I might need to chub along with that 50 lbs a few weekends until I'm in more respectable shape.
     
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  40. longknives

    longknives Scout

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    Location:
    Seattle, but I left my heart in Idaho.
    A spring weekend with low temperatures in the upper 30s would have me at about 30 pounds with 2 liters of water, food, and axe. I carry about 2 to 2.5 pounds of food per day.
     
  41. ROCK6

    ROCK6 Scout

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    Mtwarden has a hobby of self-immolation:D My wife and I came to the decision that we only plan our distance trips to about 15 miles a day; that's our comfort limit. Our fun-factor starts to drop once we get too far past 15 miles:D I've shaved weight, but I've just found a good load-out with a base weight that fluctuates between 12-15 pounds depending on the season. My goal is to keep my full pack weight between 25-30 pounds (up to 6-7 days of food/fuel and average about 2.5 liters of water). This is a comfortable weight that I can literally carry all day. My only concerns are comfortable sleep. We will use hammocks down to about 35 degrees before switching to a tent (which isn't often down here in GA except for a couple months out of the year or traveling out West). I sleep far better in a hammock, and when not asleep, I get most of my leisure reading, relaxing, cooking, or doing gear/personal maintenance in/from my hammock.

    Even after making my "list" of items and weight, you have to be honest with yourself and I highlight all the items I know I could do without. It adds up to a few pounds, but it's acceptable weight that provides mental comfort, not necessity. Ironically, my tent shelter packing list is lighter than my hammock list. I still tweak here and there, trying to balance (and be honest) between needs and wants; swapping redundancy with multi-function; and ensuring my comfort doesn't exceed my comfortable pack weight or that shaving a gram doesn't cost $100 without a significant improvement in performance.

    ROCK6
     
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  42. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    When my wife and I go, it's also in the 10-15 mile range- I've learned that it's best to keep Momma happy :4:

    My pack weight goes up substantially on outings with my wife. Roomy shelter, extra clothing for lounging, fancier meals, etc. Last year I even bought a couple of lwt chairs, such a hit that I'm sure they will accompany us on all future outings :)
     
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  43. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I just finished packing for an over-night tomorrow, and am weighing in at 32lbs, complete with food, water and pocket carry. Nowhere near light or ultra-light, but I've lightened my load by about 20 pounds since the last time I backpacked into camp. And, it's the first time I've EVER gotten everything inside my pack, so I've saved a bunch of space too. WOOHOO!

    There's no hike in or out this time, but there will be in a month and a half. I'm taking all fresh food this time, and completely overdoing it when it comes to the menu, but I can change all that stuff out for dried or dehydrated and shave off a bunch more weight next time.

    The biggest changes I've made are the following, but keep in mind I'm going on one of our rare hot weather days. ;)

    -backpack (will go from 8 pounds to 4 next time)
    -tent (gone from 10 pound, to 8, to 4 right now)
    -sleeping bag (gone from 3 pounds to about 1)
    -bed roll (haven't weighed it, but it's at least half the weight and size)
    -eliminating unnecessary redundancies, like extra cook pots & stoves, back-up shelter, clothes & tools
    -seriously thinking through my menu and only taking what I intend to eat
     

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