Where do you bug-out to?

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by M.Hatfield, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. M.Hatfield

    M.Hatfield Midnight Joker #42 Lifetime Supporter

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    Your home is destroyed by any number of devastating disasters. Where do you go from there?

    I assume most of us have a bag of some description prepared

    Some folks are comfortable camping out. Others have friends or family. Even more might find a local hotel or motel to use temporarily.

    Do different types of disasters require different locations? Wildfires might make areas prone to mudslides or flash floods. Flash flooding might make roadways impassible for traffic. Tornadoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes all have problems that might force different responses.

    The recent earthquakes that @blue333 and others posted about had me thinking about this. Any number of disasters can basically wipe an area clean.

    Especially interesting might be responses from folks who have lost it all. Had to live elsewhere before rebuilding. Maybe even forced folks to move permanently?

    Looking to see some brain storming. Maybe even ideas few of us considered.
     
  2. Todd1hd

    Todd1hd Supporter Supporter

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    I think my first stop would be a friend or relative if possible. Take a breath, survey the damage, and come up with the most prudent plan based on the situation at hand.
     
  3. chndlr04

    chndlr04 roughian #2 Supporter

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    Only other place for me to go is to my wife’s grandmas house which is a 5 hour drive away at minimum.
     
  4. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    Yes, i think the type of disaster has a great effect on what to do next, and long term. A tornado doesnt have much chance of an immediate recurrence, start picking up pieces of useful possessions and start cleaning up. A wildfire, if the house is gone, the surrounding area may be unsafe for a time, but you can start cleaning up and see what insurance is going to do when its safe to go back in. Other issues may be factors, like mudslides etc, or may not. Earthquake? Yes, there may be ongoing problems, perhaps not, that may be less of a factor in places that they arent as common. Setting up camp in the yard may be sufficient to mitigate the immediate safety issues until it quiets down and repair or rebuilding can take place, or to go through the rubble to get useful personal items out.

    A persons personal situation is also going to play a part, if family members have work, family and lives in the area, youre not likely moving away. If solo and not otherwise dependent on living in that area, it may be simpler to go somewhere else and start over.

    Edit: Regardless of how much one plans and prepares, theres likely going to be things happen that cause unforeseen complications or are uncontrollable. Thats not to say that one shouldnt plan and prepare, but to acknowledge that stuff happens and you will probably have to both A, fall back and punt, and 2, be flexible and not let stuff get to you. Ones attitude is probably their best asset, regardless of other preps or factors.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
  5. central joe

    central joe Wait For Me!! Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    My plan also. joe
     
  6. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    Depending on the situation, first recourse is a little 18' camper we have ready to go. Several campgrounds, public and private, going any direction from us. Two or three hundred miles without refuel isn't a major issue. I can't run the camper without hookup for a couple days easily.
    If necessary, I've got my work fifth wheel about 180 miles away.
    If it goes past those resources, I'll figure it out.
     
  7. hidden_lion

    hidden_lion Supporter Supporter

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    The disaster plays a major role on where to go and how far. A severely devastated community can be dangerous and no helpmor resupply possible for weeks or months. My buyout plan is not much of a plan really. Grab my gear and drive if possible outside the area of the disaster. I am perfectly content t to camp every day for the rest of my life, but my wife is not so keen to spend more then 5 days out. That complicates things a bit and I haven't quite figured out the solution
     
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  8. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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    First question: localized or widespread disaster? My/our responses to the two are quite different.

    Our overall plan is to shelter-in-place because my back and knees severely limit my mobility these days. If that option is off the table and the disaster is localized, I just grab my messenger bag, smartphone and keys; throw our go-bags and essential-document-case in my SUV; and head out of the strike zone. If all vehicles are destroyed the go-bags are on our backs, the document case slung across my shoulder, and we'll shanks-mare S-L-O-W-L-Y to the nearest refuge. That would be friends or hotel; not a public shelter unless there is absolutely no other choice. While enroute, we'll be staying out of the public eye as much as possible to avoid attracting unwanted attention.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
  9. blue333

    blue333 “O’l Slickboots” Supporter

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    Great information @Malamute
    I especially agree with your last paragraph! :dblthumb:
     
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  10. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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    Oh! I forgot to include our bicycles which, if it's feasible, we can use to relocate. We're both experienced bike-riders and our bikes are always in good repair. They're Raleigh M60 21-speed mountain bikes with "city-slicker" tires -- street tires with lugged edges just in case....
     
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  11. DKR

    DKR Scout

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    This why I carry insurance. If my home is destroyed, I would likely never return.

    This is just a place I happen to live in ...right now.
     
  12. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    We can stay with the In-laws for as long as we'd need to, they're great people who'd give the shirt off their back to those in need.
    If it was widespread and long-term, my tools go in the truck and we can start over anywhere. That's one positive aspect of being a tradesman with a specialized skillset; for the time being at least everyone needs electricity, lol.
    If everything is gone, no truck, no tools, no family... I suppose that's when the Alice rucks, guns and fishing gear come into play.
     
  13. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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    At our age, we ARE the in-laws.... :eek::46:
     
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  14. hillst1

    hillst1 Supporter Supporter

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    I have a well stocked Aliner camper that can be towed almost anywhere.
     
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  15. Lazarusaurus

    Lazarusaurus Idot Supporter

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    When I escaped the fire in Paradise, I stayed for a few weeks with a friend in Chico. Currently staying with friends in Yuba City. Lost everything in the fire, and have no desire to go back and rebuild. Still trying to figure out what I want to be when I grow up at this point. Hard to make long term plans when you can't even think straight.
     
  16. LongChinJon

    LongChinJon Supporter Supporter

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    Hurricanes are the most common disaster here. We are fortunate to have loved ones at various locations where we can stay if we evacuate.
    Camping isn't a reasonable solution for me when it is hot with high humidity, and more to the point, history shows that almost anywhere you can camp will be full of evacuees unless you evacuate long before most other folks. Same thing goes for hotels.

    Two cents: when you evacuate your home in the middle of a disaster, the lack of information is maddening, and communication with friends, neighbors, and family is more important than usual. If I evacuate again, I really want to be somewhere that meets basic needs, is comfortable, and has phone and internet service so I can be up to date with the latest information.
     
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  17. Florida Bullfrog

    Florida Bullfrog Tracker

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    If my home is destroyed, we’ll just stay put and live in what’s left. My home is my bugout location. We’re surrounded by food and water and we’re off the beaten path. No reason to leave it just because our structure we called our house is destroyed.

    It would take irradiation or some other plague-like condition tied to the land to make us leave it.
     
  18. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

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    too many variables
    9-11 I was stuck away from home for a few days as lower manhattan was closed off, stayed at my sisters nearby
    wasn't an issue of supplies as we had all we needed, in stock or available in stores
    sandy we went without power for +1 month, first few days we were scattered, among family houses nearby
    did do a run to my PA place 100 miles away for supplies,
    had to stay close to home for work, so disappearing was not an option
    I live in the city and have 2nd home 100 miles away, also have 50 acres with a house I rent out +300 miles away, 300 miles away is not a practical distance for temporary bug outs,
    still want to be close to home to check on things and do regular cleanup after the event
     
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  19. slysir

    slysir Supporter Supporter

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    Trade the wife for much needed supplies. :rolleyes::cool:

    -John
     
  20. dads2vette

    dads2vette Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'm going camping or to a relatives to address needs. Only worries for me are wildfire and getting robbed when not there. I can stay there if robbed obviously but probably wouldn't for the long haul. Wildfire...that would suck. I was once married and made it thru that so I'm sure I could make it thru just about anything.

    To mirror @Malamute , I tell my kids "don't sweat the little things, there are no big things" Just means don't waste your energy worrying about stuff. You gotta get thru it, put your efforts and energy into getting thru it.

    dave
     
  21. MAD Punty

    MAD Punty Supporter Supporter

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    If it isn't too bad, I have family and friends I can stay with.

    If it is some kind of pestilence or something, Zombie Apocalypse Bird Flu, I'm heading for the Boreal forest. Nice knowing y'all.
     
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  22. Daveboone

    Daveboone Scout

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    Depending on the exact situation....
    Immediately, we could move from the house to the detached cinderblock garage, which has a wood stove, generator and a zillion lanterns. Rig up some temporary bedding, and we are sheltered with heat. After that, less than an hour away we have our off the grid camp, which has extra food, clothing, footwear, weapons etc. It would be comfortable for an extended amount of time. In an absolute worse case scenario where the car/truck or motorcycle is out of commission, we could walk to it in about two days pressed travel, but have family/friends much closer than that.
     
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  23. Pinelogcreek

    Pinelogcreek Supporter Supporter

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    My area was just wiped clean by Hurricane Michael, no hotels and very widespread damage. Like @Lazarusaurus we lost our home. Unlike fire victims though we still had things there we could salvage. The family left town but I stayed to protect things from looters and begin to clean up. I stayed in a corner of the living room that was still dry without power or running water for weeks. Many stayed in tents, campers or, with strangers. Many myself included are still living this way 9 months later. Lots of people sleeping under work trucks to stay cool and to keep their equipment safe. What I’m saying is it may be necessary to remain to salvage what you can and that takes preparation and willingness to suffer a little.

    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/thre...to-the-aftermath-of-hurricane-michael.242643/
     
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  24. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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    If there's nowhere to go and our camping gear survives, we could live fairly well in the yard. If only part of it survives, I can probably fashion reasonable alternatives. If none of it survives, creating "the new homestead" will take a bit longer.... :33:
     
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  25. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    The plans I have in place involve bugging IN for the majority of issues/problems, protecting and recovering what we can and if necessary "camping" in the back yard, if the house is that badly damaged. However if it ever got to the really serious like an ordered evacuation of the area or a relatively localized total destruction of the area, then it would be load the truck with all we NEED and drive to family in another state (about 5hrs away). There we would glamp in their back yard and have the use of their facilities unless weather was really bad in which case we would be inside and sleeping on the living room floor. The glamping in their back yard is due to the fact they have no spare rooms and a small house and being the daughter with her youngish family we would want to try and give them a certain amount of privacy and semblance of normality! Although, in all reality, the grandson would probably end up staying in the tent with gramps, thoroughly enjoying the adventure of it, and letting grandma sleep in his bed LOL.

    OJ
     
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  26. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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    Something that considerable disaster experience as a responder has taught me: DON'T become a refugee, "depending on the kindness of strangers" (thank you, Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire) unless there is absolutely no other choice.

    Assuming a massive, widespread disaster that destroys our home, the nearest non-local friends/relatives that we might stay with are at least one-and-a-half tanks of gas away. That assumes excellent road conditions, which is a gigantic assumption.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019 at 7:44 PM
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  27. blind & lost

    blind & lost LB#42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Bug in, last resort leave in 19' camper, as said above, we are the in-laws.
     
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  28. Park Swan

    Park Swan Maker Vendor

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    It really depends. I would like to think I'd be able to get my car on the road, but who knows. If roads are impassible, I'm not prepared with some crazy 4x4 apocalypse tank and hundreds of gallons of gas like some folks.
     
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  29. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    I don't know where we could go honestly. 99% of the people we know live within 10miles. The other 1% are over 1000miles away.
    Probably just camp somewhere relatively safe.

    Thats IF we could get out.
     
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  30. Scarywoody

    Scarywoody Scout

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    For the folks with campers, in the event your house is destroyed by a storm, tornado, earthquake, etc. Wouldn't your camper also be compromised due to the fact that you park it at your house?
     
  31. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    Cool thread topic!

    Some sage advice offered up as well.

    Like @M.Hatfield
    The recent earthquake scenarios have me thinking or rethinking many options.

    I live in the Northern Adirondacks. So, I don’t focus as much on earthquakes, forest fires, and tornados. They are still possible up here, but numerically, the risk is low.

    The thought of a quake leveling your home and with it the lion’s share of your preps and supplies is a daunting challenge.

    I have a pantry full of glass canning jars filled with hard earned food. That could all be gone in seconds in a quake zone. Or a tornado for that matter. Or even a forest fire. Butunlike the wind or the fire, there is virtually no warning with a quake.

    I think the risk of a forest fire here in the Adirondacks is growing, but it is still rather low. Especially with the weather patterns typical of my area.

    For the record, I have never had to do an emergency bug out. I did however live in an old barn for over 18 months. It had electric, running water and rudimentary heat.

    One of the things I learned from that experience, is what was normal goes away, and is replaced by simpler methods and procedures.

    All of my cooking was either done outside over a wood fire. Or inside on a basic Coleman two burner propane stove.

    I went with the propane variety for several reasons. It was cheap, It was portable, It offered up fast heat. And was simple to cook on. Pretty much mirroring your kitchen gas stove.

    There was running water, a toilet, and tiny sink. No tub or shower. Doing dishes changed drastically. Basically one plate, one set of utensils and one cup each, for the bride and myself.

    Everything was washed in a small plastic basin. This situation was not derived from an emergency. It was more of a planned learning exercise. So I had time to think and evolve at a relaxed pace.

    Cleanliness and personal hygene leap out as major issues. And keep in mind, we still had running water. Less dishes, equals less washing. Less washing means less carrying of water.

    Hot water was available.
    Hot running water is highly under rated. It is beyond cool!
    I showered outside with the aid of hot water from a garden hose for over a year and a half in the Adirondacks. Some days well below zero degrees F.

    It’s pretty amazing how your body adapts. Going into the first winter, I about froze most mornings. By late winter, it was just a normal occurance. The worst days weren’t the frigid ones. The worst ones were, the 39F and pouring down cold rain with associated wind. They flat out sucked. But they still weren’t that bad.

    I’d rather be cold, wet, and clean, than warm, dry, and dirty.

    This little exercise showed me something most folks don’t give enough, or even any thought to.

    Personalities! Your personality and the personalities of those around you will affect you on a very large scale. As I have stated on here elsewhere, I have a very cool wife. Most women would have never tolerated this little experiment. My bride not only tolerated it. She thrived in it. She embraced the simplicity it offered.

    For my part in her comfort. I acquired a plastic rubbermaid barnyard tub. One hunders gallons I think. She said it was the best bathtub she ever had. Twice a week she got a nice hot bath.

    Other days ii was a quick shower or G.I. Style bath from a wash bucket. Many women I know wouldn't have made it a month. In realiity, And to be fair, I’m not sure how many men would have tolerated it either. The whole thing was a rather Spartan adventure.

    Many of these threads lead to the discussion of ARs, Bowie Knives, and other gear. Probably because they are all really exciting and vastly more cool than discussing personalities.

    But the people you are with, their personalities, and indeed you own. Will make you or break you, no matter how many cool gadgets you have. Attitude is everything!

    My brother, who passed long ago. Used to joke, that if he were dropped off in Alaska with a tractor trailer full of survival gear he’d be dead in a week.

    Then stating, if I were dropped off in the same place with just a knife. I’d walk out two months later weighing more than I did going in.

    Not sure that is exactly accurate. But it is a shining example of how different folks think.

    One of my favorite lines of his, when he was trying to explain to his friends about my exploits when we were younger went something like this.

    “He goes out into the woods with just a canteen, a knife, and a tarp. My idea of camping is the Ramada!” That story always cracked me up.

    Some of the best survival quotes. That are just as useful for everyday of you life, come from Henry Ford.

    1. “If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right“

    2. “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently‘

    3. “When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it”

    Mr. Ford is worth reading about. Many never viewed him as very bright. Some even though he was on the slow side. But no one can deny, he knew how to get things done.

    The bride and I were sort of discussing some preps yesterday. She rightly pointed out that we should probably have a few more tooth brushes stockpiled. I agreed.

    I have cleaned my teeth with some woods ash and my index finger. But I can tell you plainly, tooth brushes and toothpase make it much more pleasurable.

    I went a different route with my answer here. Mostly because many folks have already covered a boat load of scenarios. Where? How widespread? Duration? Natural, or civil discourse? Urban Or rural?

    All of the above matter. How you prepare for them matters too.

    We were provided with a great example last night.
    Much of Manhattan was without power for roughly five hours. I’m sure many folks would describe it as a rather unpleasant inconvenience.

    While others would describe it as absolutely a horrible show.

    Yet a few probably had a great evening and the time of their lives.

    Some folks think a disaster is no pickle on their Big Mac. Others get through cancer and say others have real problems.

    Prep some, learn some bushcraft, train a little, learn to shoot if you choose.

    But devote some time to the software between your ears, and the ears of those around you. You will be much happier if you have to face challenges moving forward.
     
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  32. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    eminent atomic attack ,
    fire taking every thing,
    flood , temporary
    Flood , permanent .
    Pandemic .
    Invasion , other country,
    invasion , internal revolt
    Tornado .
    hurricane.
    Economic depression.
    eminent domain ,
    health.
    excessive tax burden ,
    winning the lottery.
    I am sure there are some I have forgotten.
    Earth quakes don't bother me much because for the most part I am prepared with securing things preventively however ,
    the common fear of California breaking off into the pacific has it's challenges . For which I have held on to a boat or 3, just because I already own them.
    Just because my elevation is at about 1400 feet ,doesn't mean I'm impervious . 40 miles from the ocean is not that safe .but again nothing may happen in my lifetime .
    For fire I do my preventive maintenance and anticipate that if the economy falls and things go bad we will have no fire department , and no city water pressure.
    I have to build another tank on a trailer with its own pump .
    I fought fire as a young man fighting forest fires , and I've had a few events of my own .
    We get heavy winds here from time to time and trees and limbs come down too . I have 2 trees that need to come down before the wind does it. they happen to provide needed shade ,but they are not what I call quality wood. not even good for fire wood.
    Even if the house falls down I have a steel building I can move into .
    I have survived in some pretty meager situations in the past , I can do it again.
    If I have to run to higher ground there are mountains all around, problem is there is not much wild life in them nor much water either. . this is desert actually, and I know for a fact there are several people that plan to hunt post SHTF . If I know a few there is several thousand with the same idea . the competition for food will be the biggest problem.
    Being able to move my stash will be the greatest challenge. Having a working vehicle is one thing ,roads and paths that are passable is another.
    Choke points at crossings and bridges and fissures in the road can bring things to a halt . If you don't have the means to go over or through you can loose every thing you saved for the disaster .
     
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  33. CaliforniaCanuck

    CaliforniaCanuck Guide

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    Where, can’t be answered until it happens!
     
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