Winter Primitive Shelter

Discussion in 'Shelter' started by charles, Jul 11, 2018 at 9:37 PM.

  1. charles

    charles Tracker

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    Hello everyone, with winter a few months away, I’ve been thinking about what primitive shelter I should try on my winter overnighters. I usually use a lean too with one side brought down. Winter where I live doesn’t get super cold, never below zero and very little snow What kind of primitive shelter do you guys use in the winter?
     
  2. OMRebel

    OMRebel He who piddles Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I don't have a lot of experience with primitive shelters, so I'll watch and see what others say. Are you looking for something to last over the winter, or just survive a few nights?
     
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  3. 6gun

    6gun Scout

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    No real input but I'll chime in anyway. I'm in N Georgia where we deal with very little snow comparatively. I have stayed in a friends Adirondack shelter that the floor area was 8X16 with 12' of it being under roof and a 4' porch. He had a small wood stove setting at the front and we stayed reasonably comfy in 25*F nights and mornings with decent sleeping bags. I will be copying his setup as soon as I get some property secured. Best of luck with your set-up and please post pictures for those of us who will live vicariously through you!
     
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  4. charles

    charles Tracker

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    Just a few nights
     
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  5. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Super shelter variant?
     
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  6. charles

    charles Tracker

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    I’ve thought about trying that, they look really cool
     
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  7. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    They aren’t that hard to construct. A little more time consuming but worth it in my opinion.
     
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  8. Thortek

    Thortek Tracker

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    I personally am a fan of the super shelter. After my failed winter over nighter last year I really started looking into them and I started on one of my own. Basically I am building a lean-too with a tarp on the back cover in leaves and boughs. Then I have a 3mil(I think) Clear plastic drop cloth on the front I can roll up with a log. There is a raised bed on the inside with boughs underneath it. On the outside is a fire pit with a reflector. I got the idea from Survival Lily and Joe Robinet. Check out their YT videos. I hope do to one of mine soon.

    Todd
     
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  9. OMRebel

    OMRebel He who piddles Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I've done a super shelter, which worked well. However, I would not consider that a primitive shelter due to using modern plastic.

    I would imagine a debris shelter would suffice for a few nights. Make a lean to or A frame with sticks and pile as much leaf debris on it as possible. Pile a thick layer on the inside as well to insulate from the ground. You would want to just fit in it and it would be pretty much a debris sleeping bag. Insulate from cold and trap in heat.
     
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  10. atlastrekker

    atlastrekker Supporter Supporter Bushclass III Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I am going to agree with this. For a couple nights I would build a raised bed and then a shelter over top of that. For some good ideas there are a few of us that did them in the advanced bushclass thread, if you haven't seen that one yet you might want to take a look.
     
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  11. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie Supporter

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    If it doesn't get very cold in your AO you could get away with just a lean to and small fire to sleep by. If you want to be more enclosed and protected I would go with a wikiup! It's basically like a stick/debris tipi. Same shape and rough design and is perfect for a couple days in the bush. They take a lot of time and energy to construct (like all primitive shelters do) especially compared to throwing up a tarp but it's a fun project and a worthy shelter.

    I've made and slept in a few of them! This was before I joined BCUSA so no pics :(
     
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