Wood pile cutting frame.

Discussion in 'Homesteading' started by Beach Hiker, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB #42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I often find that when I take trees down that it's the "mid-size" branches that cause me the most trouble: they're too thick to use wood shears on, and too thin for easy chainsaw cutting.

    I took this solution from the truly excellent book "Norwegian Wood" by Lars Mytting.

    Basically, you build a fence type frame. As you collect those pesky sized branches, place them in the rack.
    20181108_091221.jpg

    Another view: I have eight sharpened stakes (just random branches made into stakes) as supports. Driven in with a sledge hammer.
    20181108_091234.jpg

    When the rack is full, grab the chainsaw. ... and this is the fun and rewarding part.... start cutting. In a few minutes you have a nice little wood pile.
     
  2. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB #42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    First cut: (about a minute of work)
    20181108_091422.jpg
    And so it goes:
    20181108_091826.jpg

    Until you have a good bit of wood from a few minutes work:
    20181108_092042.jpg
    You will need to occasionally hammer the stakes in again, as they loosen during the cutting.
     
  3. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB #42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Random wood pile shots:
    The showy pile... for next year.
    20181108_091133.jpg
    The kitchen kindling pile:
    20181108_091139.jpg

    The daily use and abuse pile:
    20181108_092510.jpg
     
  4. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Thats working smarter not harder:dblthumb:. Your halfway to a waddle panel with that. I've seen the same kind of frame. They then weave in the thin and flexible branches. In one video they drilled holes in a log to hold the upright sticks. It acted as a jig to keep your spacing. Once you reach the last weave with a horizontal. They twist the end to soften it, then tie it back on itself. Pull it off the log and start the next. Amazing what you can do with a bunch of sticks.
    Cheers Jim
     
  5. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Excellent job @Beach Hiker . When i am cutting wood, I usually cut the larger branches into firewood length before I cut it off of the trunk. Sometimes though, I just use a hand saw to cut them.
     
  6. RobOz

    RobOz Guide

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    Nice work. I also have that wood cutting book.
     
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  7. dads2vette

    dads2vette Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Nice work! My wood processing is a little different from what it use to be in Western NY. Ten face cord split and stacked, 20"-24" in length, keep those big gnarly suckers for the overnight burn. Now I gut the wood in 12"-14" lengths and stack about 1.5 cords worth(maybe that). No need for big overnight pieces. I do all my chopping with a hatchet.

    Going to get down to 20 somewhere around here on Monday. But it's a "dry" cold.

    dave
     
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  8. RI Chevy

    RI Chevy Scout

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    Cool idea. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  9. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB #42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    @dads2vette
    So you need less wood now? Warmer climate?
    I also use nasty gnarled wood for overnight. ...
     
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  10. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Now that's slick! And that is a LOT of firewood!!
     
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  11. dads2vette

    dads2vette Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Slightly different climate...moved form just south of Buffalo, NY to the high desert here in Arizona. Cool temps in the winter, maybe high teens as a low. Jumps to high 40's/low 50's during the day most of the winter. Gotta poke thru the ice in the winter so my neighborhood birds can drink.

    dave
     
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  12. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB #42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    You'd be surprised. Ask @gohammergo. ..
    Looks can be deceptive.
     
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  13. bwallenjr

    bwallenjr Tracker

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    Thats a nice take on it. As well I buck any limbs I can as I am bucking the whole tree. Any stray limbs I trough on the sawbuck and usually through a few large logs on as weight to hold them down and the cut it all up the same principe you are using.
     
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  14. zerk

    zerk Tracker

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    I am burning maple, not alot of branches until you get high. Sometimes cut with a saw, thought I think can be bad on chain. I get it up to speed before cutting. I also use a loper a times. Especially when I have to get rid of spruce. I've had chains jump when slashing. Maybe my own fault, not maintaining my chain.

    I have so much big wood, I let real small stuff go. I do keep some.

    I was once used a sawbuck the was bunch X X X connected below the V. Worked good. But then you are hauling stuff back and then cutting. I buck it where it fell.
     
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