Wound care in the bush

Discussion in 'Bush Medicine' started by Jason, Oct 25, 2008.

  1. dchinell

    dchinell Tinder Gatherer

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    I like the Israeli bandage as a severe-wound bandage. Particularly since (after some experimentation with one I sacrificed in order to learn) I can apply it to most places with one hand.

    I also like to carry a roll of two-inch Kerlix gauze and a roll of 2-inch coban. The gauze is the dressing and the coban is the bandage. With those, I think I can apply pressure and later have a fresh dressing and bandage.

    Bear
     
  2. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    Use caution with coban and kerlix, they can both be restrictive dressings and cause problems (ie: act as a tourniquet). Not saying I wouldn't use them at all but just be aware and don't crank down on them as pressure dressings. I tend to favor ACE bandages for this. Coban can be very useful though as a protective barrier over a dressing, it also works really well for finger immobilization but the same warnings apply.
     
  3. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    +1 on the ace bandage for knife wounds. Dont ask its a long embarising story lol
     
  4. lowcard1

    lowcard1 Guide

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    Great thread I was woundering about the iodine mix. Thanks KOA this is a great place to learn.
     
  5. Seikaoth

    Seikaoth Tinder Gatherer

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    Just something about dogs licking you.

    Yes, dog saliva does help heal.....wounds a dog receives. There is a special enzyme in their saliva that does this. This enzyme however does not help heal human wounds.
    There is still a lot of speculation about this though. From what I have researched (part online part books) this has been the most common answer other than: Its not recommended due to the infections you can contract.
     
  6. EmsRescueGuy

    EmsRescueGuy Tracker

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    Just a thought on Antibiotics: Many people have strong gastrointestinal reactions including severe diarrhea, nausea and vomiting when taking these medicines.

    Not that this should stop you from taking them to prevent infections. Many doctors will prescribe them with maalox or immodium as a preventative measure as well as recomending you take them with food.

    If you have a wound that requires you to take antibiotics and you can't get to immediate medical care, It probably would be a good idea to take precautions to prevent turning a bad situation worse.
     
  7. The Bull

    The Bull Tracker

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    Thanks for this thread!

    At one time I ALWAYS kept sutures and all the goodies in my primary first-aid kit. Even though I had my certification as an EMT, and knew better, I figured that *if* (make that a big IF) the worst happened I'd be prepared. Then a guy I worked with took a deep cut to his leg on the job. Instead of getting proper attention that would have been a comp'd injury, this dope sewed it up himself. The result was an abscess, loss of his job for not reporting, and eventually the loss of his leg at the knee.

    I promptly removed all said materials from my kit. I don't even want to be tempted!

    Since then I have been seriously cut while two days from help. Irrigation along with keeping it clean & dry worked out just fine. Yeah, it had a bit of an infection when I got to a hospital but it was easily cleared. Got a nice scar from it, too, but I'll accept the trade off.

    After all I've been through, including being paralyzed from the nipple line down for a while, I figure I'm as tough as any person. The one thing I've learned is that I've got nothing to prove and I'll still with common sense and proper training.
     
  8. docdiaz

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    the solution to pollution is dilution and then a dry sterile dressing :D DITTO to what KOA said and early anyibiotic use keeps you out of trouble also
     
  9. Nerual the Mad

    Nerual the Mad Guide

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    Thanks for the info all. It never hurts to get as much info as you can. The thing with getting info from unknown sources is to double check before needing it. Now I'm not saying that anything here is off in any way. Just saying you should always make sure you know the right thing to do before doing it. Doing the wrong thing in an emergence often has very bad results. Especially where your health and safety is concerned.

    As for Dave's video. I've learned a lot from him and his vids. Take the good. Leave the bad. Use common sense. See above paragraph.
     
  10. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Awesome thread. You really know the best way to care for a wound in the bush? Don't get one in the first place. Not to sound flip, but safety and forethought go a long way in the bush. If your miles from nowhere you really need to think before you do anything that coud harm yourself. Keep your tools sharp, use them correctly. Don't do potentialy dangerous things if you' re tired.
    Stay safe.
    Wolf
     
  11. Geoffrey

    Geoffrey Guide

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    Koa, what about a solution made from potassium permanganate.

    I carry these crystals in all my kits.

    Do you have any first hand knowledge on these?

    I have read a number of conflicting reports on the use of PP for first aid.
     
  12. Hugin

    Hugin Scout

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    Which is also why I take work gloves wear ballistic safety glasses in the bush. The glasses are a two-fer: one clear and one sunglasses, and they accept Rx inserts(which I need).ESS ICE 2X I've already had them save my face from bush-lash from someone in front of me breaking trail.
     
  13. gm42

    gm42 Scout

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    KOA,

    Can you make a list of items that you would consider being the minimal items in a long term survival first aid kit?

    Also, a guy I know (I will not give the name) said Scours Antibiotic Tablets for horse and pigs can be used as an antibiotic for people. What do you know about this?

    This is a great thread!

    Geoff
     
  14. Pablo

    Pablo Guide

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    honey for wounds

    I'm absolutely convinced that the best wound dressing I've ever used is straight honey. After 15 summers teaching survival in the field in Utah and Colorado, and numerous other courses in colleges, I'm certain it works better than anything not only to prevent infection, but also to reduce existing infections. There are a number of reasons for this, but it the bottom line is that the chemistry of honey makes it very effective at preventing and clearing up infections. Just irrigate the wound in question, apply a thin layer of honey, and bandage it up.

    I've used it only on simple lacerations and small abrasions. I did try it once on a large patch of road rash on my knee from a fall, and it hurt way too much! I know it's recommended as well for burns, but based on this experience, I'm not sure how that would feel??

    Of course, other wound care protocols, such as warm water soaks and fresh dressing should also be followed... If you do a google search, you'll find a number of clinical studies backing this experience up. The hot ticket is apparently a particular type of honey from Australia, but I've had excellent results with straight table honey from the grocery store. How's that for accessible, affordable health care!
     
  15. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    I have no recommendations regarding veterinary antibiotics but I do know they make good antibiotics for human use that can be obtained from doctors via prescription. You also need to know which antibiotic to use for which type of infection.
     
  16. Zatt

    Zatt Scout

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    That was an awesome post! Thanks!
     
  17. rickh

    rickh Tracker

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    I gotta cut gone wrong story.
    Working i nmy shop late one evening I had just sheared a piece of sheet metal and laid it on the bench. It was hanging over the edge a little. I move to do something else and when I turned back around, I hit the top of my thumb knuckle on the freshly sheared edge. Nice cut all the way to the bone. It did not hit a tendon or anything. Well I washed it up and warped it and went on. Kept it clean and treated for about a week and then it went down hill from there. Swelling puss the works! I went to the Dr and they examined it, put some more topical on it and gave me an antibiotic. Well in less than a week, I was on the operating table have a surgeon digging all the white crap out and it had messed up my tendon which had to be cut and sewn back together. All healed up fine as a matter of fact, I seem to have more range of motion now.
    So in the end, my stubbornness got me a $6,500 surgeons bill and that was out patient!
    Moral of the story, don't be a he man and get medical attention as soon as possible!
    Rick H...
     
  18. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Amen. See a doctor, and above all, don't try to suture yourself up !;)
     
  19. GhostMountainJack

    GhostMountainJack Tracker

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    How about you just come along with me? Sounds like you know what your doing.

    Your advice certainly beats my high school football coach's wound care advice - "rub some dirt on it."
     
  20. Two Bears

    Two Bears Banned Member Banned

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    Feminine pads are supposed work real good for serious bleeding. Never had to use one yet but I carry 'em.
     
  21. Keyser Söze

    Keyser Söze Usual Suspecto Supporter Lifetime Supporter

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    koa's a hardcore pro

    he wants you to cut yourself so he can fix you up...:p

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  22. petrifiedwood

    petrifiedwood Guest

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    I'm guessing the subsequent hospital visit for the inevitable infection was not the next installment of a comprehensive video series from that youtube channel. :D
     
  23. Keyser Söze

    Keyser Söze Usual Suspecto Supporter Lifetime Supporter

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    at the meet's you'l have to chose between Koa or Mac:51:

    koa
    [​IMG]

    Mac
    [​IMG]

    he gave this class at the first bcusa meet on fake flesh , real cuts and real techniques for suturing

    [​IMG]
     
  24. eebae015

    eebae015 Scout

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    Thank you Koa for the information.
     
  25. MtnManJoe

    MtnManJoe Guide

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    lol .. I hadn't heard that for Many Moons .. Thank You.

    Last Spring, I was out in The Bush, and managed to put a pretty deep/jagged gash into my thumb, with my pack saw.

    As It was raining heavily, and I was hurrying to finish the shelter I was building, I simply let the wound bleed out a little, and let the rain wash the area .. Then I grabbed a bit of sphagnum moss, chewed it a bit to mush it out, put it in and on the open wound, and wrapped it with a strip of Duct Tape from my 'kit' .. and continued with what I was doing.

    Later, while sitting in my shelter, I pulled off the 'bandage', and rinsed out the wound with falling rain .. and I grabbed some Selfheal and some Yarrow that was close at hand, chewed it into a mush, and applied it to the wound, and re-wrapped it with Duct Tape. I didn't look at it again for 24 hours, and when I did it appeared to be doing fine, so I let it 'air out'

    ... Long story short .. By the time I got home - about a week later - the wound was healing well, with no sign of infection at any time since the injury .. I applied a bit of Calendula salve, that My Wife makes, every day, and after another week it was healed ..
    Looking at it right now, I actually see only the slightest sign of any scarring at all.

    Should it have had a stitch or two? .. Probably
    ... But, as I don't 'do doctors' any more than absolutely necessary, even if this had happened 'in town' I most likely would have dealt with it 'pretty much' the same as I did.
     
  26. D.K.

    D.K. Tracker

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    QuikClot is a useful tool only for major trauma. Most bleeding can be controlled by direct pressure. Also it burns like hell when applied and then it is a bitch to clean out in the emergency room. By the way - I used steristrips made from duct tape while an active duty combat medic years ago. In hot, humid climates regular strips just didn't work even with collodian.
     
  27. xj35s

    xj35s Banned Member Banned

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    Human bites are among the worst as far as infection dangers. Perhaps your own saliva is better than someone else, but I'd not use spit on any wound in the bush. I have always let my wounds heal naturally. Even some that were to the bone and needed stitching. By the time Mom saw it and got me to the docs that wouldn't stitch it anyway. I seem to always heal within a week.
     
  28. akabu

    akabu Supporter Supporter

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    you know how Tape of some kinds will not hold up to the rigors of the real world try a Velcro strap have done this a few times in fact doing it tonight.
     
  29. swiss_army_knife

    swiss_army_knife Tracker

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    The root of a yucca plant can be rinsed then beaten with a rock. The inner flesh can then be used with water as an antiseptic (soap) for wounds. Externally only though.
     
  30. drewhelean

    drewhelean Guest

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    My son recently had aappendicitis (sp?) and we had to have an I.V. for him at home. Everyday we had to flush the I.V. With saline. When it was all said and done there were several saline "syringes" (these screw into a port on the I.V. so there are no sharps) left over. The ones that were left were ours to keep, so i divided them up int the fak's for irrigating any nasty cuts in the field. I am glad someone else thinks about this stuff! Lol
     
  31. Wildsurvival86

    Wildsurvival86 Tinder Gatherer

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    Maxi pads

    I use duct tape fishing line and a maxi pad for my deep cuts. Put a decent amount of duct tape about 2-3 inchs outside the wound on both sides. Take the maxi( any type of pad will work I use maxi pads because they are so cheap) stitch the pad to the two pieces of duct tape on both sides and tighten them as needed, this will push the laserations together with out having to poke yourself and become more pron to infections.
     
  32. Bush Otter

    Bush Otter Supporter Supporter

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    Great advice from again from KOA , I find that when every thing is in control and then from activity or bumping starts a bleeding issue again that to protect and imobilize the wound are till the healing takes hold.
     
  33. Eagle Edge

    Eagle Edge Tracker

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    Thank you for all of the information KOA. One evening awhile back one of my wifes friends was over, the friend is a Doc. We got one the subject of wound closures. I almost always use super glue, once the bleeding is stopped by direct pressure, to close the wound. So I asked the Doc about it and her reply was, "Why not, we use stuff very similar to super glue in the ER all the time, it's called Derma Bond." I know that people have fears that it will be a permanent closure and if infection set in you will really be up a creek. But this is not true, the usually peels in a couple days and needs to be reapplied if the wound is serious enough to require that.
     
  34. phiposurde

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    my kind of talk 8)

    I didn't read all the threads but I got the main ideas of questions. I am preparing a Youtube video on wound management in the wilderness that should be posted soon on my channel (TheMountainRn). But here my opinion on the subject:
    1) "the solution to pollution is dilution"
    In 98% of the wound you will encounter normal saline will be ok to use and preferable to use. The Only time you use other solution is if you visually see dirt in the wound

    http://www.suite101.com/content/normal-saline-for-wound-care-a16216
    http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.com/pdfs/journals/1080-6032/PIIS1080603210000542.pdf

    2)Right amount of pressure.
    The ultimate irrigation devise is a 20cc syringe with a 18G end tip. Cause to much you cause damage not enough you don't clean much. But again dilution is better then nothing

    3)If you don't know how to suture... don't
    Suturing is a technic like any other technic. You can learn it. But there a reason why advanced care professional are the one doing it. There different knots, suture product, ect. And all those depends on the type of wounds, the time of closure, ect. So if you can't assess all of those. What you just did is closed bacteria in an Environment that they thrive on. Your increasing the risk of delay wounds repair, increase risk of sepsis ( very bad general infection). I had a bad wound I repair without suture and heal well. If you really want to carry something I would carry staple over suture.

    4) keep your tetanus up to date
    One possible complication, although very rare, is to get teatnus from the dirt. So if you didn't get a tetanus boost in the last 10 years, go get one.

    5) technology is not just for gadget
    There some awesome dressing we use in hospital that could be useful in the wilderness. They are expensive but worth to buy. In an era of increase home care they have become more easily available to the general public.

    6) don't use alcohol pads on an open wounds
    http://www.youtube.com/user/adventuremedical#p/search/0/JYQvyvVCOmk

    http://www.dhphomedelivery.com/wound-care-wound-cleansing.pdf
     
  35. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    Did you at least read the first post?
     
  36. br79

    br79 Scout

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    I can attest to the fact that many cuts to not need stitches. As a youth I had a knack for getting myself cut up a lot. Most cuts on the hands, forearms, shins and the like can be taken care of with pressure.
    Clean the would, put some antibiotic gel on it, cover with a gauze pad then tape it tight. You want it tight enough to keep the wound closed but not cutting of circulation. A good way to make sure your circulation is still going is to pinch yer finger nail, it should turn white then go back to pink instantly, if it takes longer then a second yer squeezing to tight.
    Just the other weekend out fishing I stabbed my finger pretty deep, and hit an artery (bright red blood and pumping out in rhythm with my heart). I took care of it myself and after about 30-40 minutes. I went back to fishing, with the wife rolling her eyes.
     
  37. sherpa

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    I must chime in on this. From a recent personal experience, I got to learn a little more than I wanted to know at the time about wound infections. I was on a backpacking/fishing trip and got a cut on my foot that a few days later became infected. We were pretty exposed so it took a few days to get to legit medical help. By then it got so bad, I was at risk for amputation. They said if the antibiotics didnt show some healing within the first day, I was losing a part of a body part. Thankfully it did, and the infection that had started to spread, finally began to heal.

    Then came the wound healing. Mind you I'm a healthy dude. They said my blood flow was solid, no diabetes or anything that would keep me from healing. But regardless, it was holding on and being stubborn. This wound would not heal and there was a small amount of skin infection that they simply could not get away with oral drugs. They debrided me with a blade and a pharm grade ointment called santyl to begin with. It didn't work though, so after two months of that dance they sent me to a wound clinic. The first day I met my new doc, he told me to go buy some iodine and get some regular table sugar, mix it up into peanut-butter like paste and apply to my wound. Literally within 48 hours my wound began to heal and the stubborn infection began to die. Yep, regular old sugar and iodine did it. So I got to talking with doc and he said they have had better success in the advanced wound clinic using natural treatments than they have with most pharm produced. He said if they sugar/iodine mixture didnt work, he would have pulled out one of the big guns --manuka honey (which has been proven very effective even on infections like MRSA --google it). Yep, all natural, no chemicals. I was shocked.

    All of what he used is cheap and available everywhere. They use these things on people who have chronic wounds, mostly folks who are diabetic and have bad blood flow, so if it works on them, it will work on you. I recommend having something like keflex around 'just in case' for sure --especially if it starts to spread quickly, but honestly if you want to effectively treat wounds and bad 'skin infections', just order some manuka honey, iodine and sugar and put them in your first aid. Also a good calcium bandage works wonders in healing process by creating the perfect healing environment for your wound. If you think you should let a wound that needs to drain itself 'breathe' the open air, think again. That is false in most situations. You want a good moist, but clean environment to heal proper. Look into a product called Duoderm for that, and put a pack in your first aid kit. Seriously this stuff works big time. It seals your wound from water and air, creates a great healing environment and also absorbs the draining of your wound. Very good stuff. I think you can get it on places like amazon. I bought mine straight from the docs office. Good stuff.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012
  38. Rubicon_Dave

    Rubicon_Dave Scout

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    Just thought I would add something to the list as far as irrigation solutions are concerned. I came across this while researching a DIY irrigation solution.

    http://www.itstactical.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Dakins_Solution.pdf

    This last weekend one of the guys in our 4 wheel club got a nasty gash on his forehead and I was the only one in the group that had a kit on hand. (gotta love my "get home bag"...) and good God, head wounds bleed like crazy... :11:

    He smashed his head on the roll bar of his jeep so the cut was reasonably clean and we irrigated with some clean water. I threw a trauma pad on it until the bleeding stopped and then finished of with a few steri-strips and a 2X3 band aid over the top. He got proper medical attention the next morning.

    Needless to say I want to Thanks KOA for this post since this post provided me with the information to stay prepared... thank you sir.

    I figure I'll "brew up" a few batches of the "Dakin's" solution and keep them with me for the trail.

    :4:
     
  39. davycrocket

    davycrocket Tracker

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    This is an excellent discussion and a subject that needs to be covered fully. There are only a few things I would add to the original post, which is 100% correct.
    First thing you do? Wash your hands! Second? Gloves!
    Now find how long ago and where the injury occurred. Bacteria begin to grow in about 6 hours even in a clean wound. Check for movement and sensation below the wound before treatment.
    there are 3 effective ways to clean a wound- scrubbing, irrigate, debriding.
    Scrubbing- disinfectants ( isopropyi alcohol, povidone-iodine, hydrogen perioxide)should not be put directly into wounds because they damage viable tissue. Scrub around the wound. Soap and water works as well as anything else.
    Irrigate- the best as stated in the OP. High pressure is best. If you do not have a syringe, take a plastic bag and poke a pin hole in it and squeeze the water out or burn a pin hole in the lid of a water bottle a squeeze the water out. What you want is pressure to dislodge the debris and stuff. Rinsing or soaking is not adequate. Use the cleanest water available, water disinfected for drinking should be used. As stated earlier a 1% solution of Povidone-iodine is suitable. Tilt the wound so the water runs out and away from the wound. Plan on at least 1/2 liter of water depending on the size of the wound. A 35 cc syringe is a good size to get.Check for further bleeding you may have loosened a blood clot. eye protection is a good idea because of splashing.
    Debriding-Debridment is the removal of debris or dead skin from a wound. Imbedded visible debris MAY be removed with forceps that have been sterilized by boiling or open flame. Carbon black on them is sterile.
    Dressings are sterile gauze placed over a wound, Bandages hold dressings in place. Dressings like Tegaderm, Second skin, opsite keep the wound moist and promote healing. Ointments like Bacitracian and Polysporin do the same. Dry dressing that adhere to the wound impeded the healing process. Apply antibiotic ointments to the dressing not directly to the wound.
    If injury is small do not close wound edges, they come together on their own. If the skin is stretched apart butterfly or steri strips can hold the edges together. Tincture of benzoin will help to adhere steri strips to skin when it starts to sweat. A deep wound should be splinted and immobilized to reduce lymphatic flow and the spread of infection. Elevation of the extremity reduces swelling. Wounds in highly vascular area like the face or scalp heal faster and are less likely to get infected as opposed to less vascular areas like the extremities. Highly contaminated wounds should be packed with moist gauze a loose bulky dressing and left open. Sutures are not needed, for a day or two usually,as part of a delayed closing procedure.
    If the- cut opens a joint space,is heavily contaminated, involves tendons or ligaments, is an animal bite, is on the face, has an impaled object, an amputation, was a serious crushing injury or shows signs of serious infection, if the wound gapes 1/2 inch you need to get them to a hospital as soon as possible.
    Antibiotics are not an alternative to cleaning and ar not indicated for most wounds. They are recommended for injuries involving tendons, especially for the hand, bones or joint spaces, as well as heavily wounds heavily contaminated with saliva. feces, or soil. If antibiotics are used they should be started as soon as possible after the injury. Use broad spectrum antibiotics prescribed by a physician, Tetracylines, Ciprofloaxcin are good.
     
  40. thisistruth

    thisistruth Tinder Gatherer

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    hey guys. just a really quick addition to this list of good information. a couple herbs to look for in wound management. i suspect these would be best suited for smaller wounds but i suppose if you had no options, they could be tried for larger ones as well. two medicinal plants to consider: shepherd's purse and plantain. shepherd's purse does great things with stopping bleeding (yarrow also works well) and plantain is great for helping a cut heal from the inside out helping to minimize the chance of infection. comfrey is great for a quick closure of a wound, but sometimes it's too great and can actually close up so quickly that it traps infection. for quick id's on these plants just check google images and you'll have no trouble finding them.
     
  41. Hugin

    Hugin Scout

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    • Tincture of benzoin works for helping adhesive stick. Good for butterfly closures and moleskin.
    • Zinc Oxide ointment is good for preventing rashes in uncomfortable places while hiking etc...
    • potassium permanganate can be used for wound cleaning, water purification, starting fires, and an anti-fungus.
    • Use a Vet's version of Dermabond, it's cheaper, just hasn't been FDA approved for humans, but it's better than superglue.
    • Antibiotics can be found at pet stores.
     
  42. Rangefinder

    Rangefinder Tracker Bushclass I

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    Great stuff in this discussion. It's actually comforting to have the feeling I'm not the only knuckle-head who has performed self-suturing on occasion...

    I stated this in another thread, but it definitely belongs here. Besides the already-mentioned things such as maxi's and duct tape, I keep a few of those little squeeze honey packets in my kit. Honey does not spoil. It's a natural anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-microbial. Before closing, but after flushing, apply generously, and often again to the surface after things start to seal up. It helps fight infection a LOT.
     
  43. SocomII

    SocomII Tracker

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    Re-evaluate first aid,self-aid kit

    Thanks for the post.4 weeks ago in the mtns. of NC,decided to try out a cold steel folding bushman that I have had for a few years and never used.About a mile down a trail,I decided to try it out on some raspberry bushes,and during the closeing operation of this knife it got away from me and pulled thru my hand and naturally all my blades are razor sharp,lo and behold my thumb was laid open. The basic first aid kit was pretty much useless,but on my shoulder strap I had my military first aid pouch with my 20yr. old combat trauma dressing (big maxi-pad) and wraped it up.This opened my eyes on a few things. As a wilderness first responder,I now realized that minor cuts and scrapes are a given out in the woods,but major trauma is going to be very easy to be afflicted with. So a few band aids and such are fine but a Trauma kit is a must. The other thing I realized was fire starting was going to be a problem. No-go on 2 handed starting so either a lighter or my Blast-match. Something to think about when you think nothing can happen to you. Outcome 4 stitches inside 8 on the outside and no more feeling in my thumb "There is only two, The quick and the Dead"
     
  44. joe305

    joe305 Guide

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    ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????
    ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????

    Obviously, this dude has never actually tried this!!!
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  45. Tony Torre

    Tony Torre Tracker

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    I keep a couple of those small survival water packs the ones that come in the silver bags in my faks for the purpose of irrigating wounds. The water is sterile and this is much faster and reliable than trying to sterilize water in the field.

    Tony Torre
    Miami Arnis Group
    www.miamiarnisgroup.com
     
  46. woodsghost

    woodsghost Guide

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    I used plantain once on a cut. I chewed it to crush and make it moist, then applied it to the cut an taped it in place.

    The wound started getting painful and stiff about 24 hrs later. I removed the plantain and applied polysporin with a bandaid. The wound stopped hurting within 6 hrs and healed fine. If it had continued to hurt for another 24-36 hrs, I would have been looking for a doc.

    Take home point: herbal remedies are useful. I buy into that "natural is better" stuff. However, it is wise to practice using those herbal remedies. Some might either 1) not work or 2) need some tweaking before you can get them to work well. Having some man-made stuff on hand is wise. If the natural stuff is not working quickly, GET YE TO THE DOC!!!!
     
  47. Crco

    Crco Scout

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    I'm still shocked at how people are still advocating Superglue and similar adhesives. This has been shown time and time and time again (by a wide variety of *experienced* medical professionals who are knowledgeable of survival and bush experiences) to not even be worth minor or backup consideration.

    From my own personal experience, I now know 2 of young men over the years who've taken the Superglue path after receiving significant injuries ... and both ended up with severe infections from insufficient debriding and irrigation prior to the gluing.

    Unbelievable.
     
  48. PaulK

    PaulK Banned Member Banned

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    As an RN, I'll break down my perspective on field wound care.

    1. Rinse out wound.
    2. Apply bandage (and pressure if necessary to stop bleeding).
    3. Seek professional medical help if the wound is serious.
    4.The end.

    Don't over complicate wound care. Use common sense and get help when the wound is beyond the boo-boo stage that you can deal with yourself.
     
  49. MrNoBuddySpecial

    MrNoBuddySpecial Tracker

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    Plantain alone is not the right choice. It lacks the antiseptic properties needed to "clean" the wound. Yarrow on the other hand would probably have healed it right up. The volatile oils work as antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and diuretic agents. The tannins are aggressive astringents. The alkaloids are both hypotensive and hypoglycemic. Yarrow even has coumarin in its cells which works as an anti-thrombotic to reduce high blood pressure.

    It's about the way you use it... If you don't clean the wound and just put SuperGlue on it, the infection will not be dealt with. SG DOES work and works well (as a solution for small cuts), if done correctly! Just as other posts have mentioned, ER and EMS use a VERY similar thing in DermaBond. But requires proper cleaning first
     
  50. 320

    320 Tracker

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    i tend to agree with you.

    sometimes just stemming bloodflow isn't enough.
    you can use your lacerated parts within 10-20 minutes after closing a wound with superglue.

    the vet who showed me how to patch up my reckless beasts was all about irrigation (sealed containers of saline solution) and leaving a drain (not closing the wound totally).

    dermabond and vet bond are similar to superglue but not the same.
    the medical products have a milder base element.

    for what it's worth i've fixed my dogs and myself when wound care wasn't in close proximity (yes, it is possible to be several hours from assistance).
    except for some unsightly scars no one is the worse for wear.

    since it works we carry:
    superglue
    saline solution
    chlorhexadrine wash
    in addition to a regular first aid kit.
     

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