Your Favorite Military Boot For Woods Walking

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by Leatherneck, Mar 19, 2019.

  1. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    The old Vietnam-era USGI canvas jungle boot was a phenomenal boot, no longer made, though there are 'wannabes' that are similar. The black nylon version is garbage (every pair I ever bought or was issued tore out after a few weeks at the first eyelet... they just were cut too closely and the nylon fabric let go of the stich).

    Another good boot that I really liked was a Hi-Tec model, don't remember what it was called, that lasted me for years... I literally walked it to pieces... 2 years in the Army, then about 8 more years trudging around the Smokies every weekend, relegated to lawn-mowing shoes for a couple more years, and finally declared 'dead'.

    I wore (and still wear) Merrell Moab Ventilators, though the quality now seems lower... first pair lasted me 8 years... this second pair was showing abnormal wear at about 3 years...

    I have a great deal of love for the Palladium Pampa Hi (just that... not "Hi-#", not "Hi-anything"). They run about $70. They're basically an old Converse basketball shoe with a slightly thicker treaded sole and made of coarser canvas. Mine are green. they make a bunch of colors, and I think a leather one (though i'm not sure, and wouldn't buy it in leather.) Perfect for hot/humid/flat environment like southeastern pine forest or dry anywhere else. If you get them wet, they're cool all day. I needed that. The sole is so thin you can actually 'feel' through it (not like mocs, but better than most others.) I loved to hunt deer or squirrels with them because of that. However, I could only personally stand about 3 miles of squirrel hunting with them before my feet got tired. More exercise/younger user might have a better result. But I loved them. They were my preferred boot in LA. NOT for use in the north east outside summer. If you're not in a hot/humid/flat environment, your feet will be sore and cold. I tried them once on a summertime adirondack trip, and they were pretty miserable... decent as a watershoe, but cold and didn't dry out (not unexpected in that climate/location.)
     
  2. The Desert Rat

    The Desert Rat Tracker

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    Sorry for the long interval between replies.

    Now, on to your second statement.

    I'm not conserved about shoe life, that's second or third on my list. How long a shoe last doesn't trump ankle and knee health. Just because you like boots or some people think military boots look cool, or some other nonsensical crap doesn't make them optimal from a biomechanical perspective.

    500 miles in biomechanical effecient hiking boots TRUMPS A 1000+ miles in non-biomechanical sound boots.

    Ankle/Knee health TRUMPS durability AND coolness factor.

    Take care of your body and your body will take care of you.

    Yes, change is hard, so is opening the box to see the truth. But, your bodies health and function should come first.

    Hope my opinion helps open your eyes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2019
  3. The Desert Rat

    The Desert Rat Tracker

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    Lastly, below is a study conducted BY THE US ARMY. Stating EXACTLY what I wrote above.

    "Alterations to footwear may have a significant effect on injury epidemiology in the lower limb."

    HENCE, WHY MODERN HIKING BOOTS ARE NOW PREFERRED IN ALMOST ALL NON-CONVENTIONAL UNITS.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851683/
     
  4. Morris777

    Morris777 Scout

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    @The Desert Rat
    current Dutch Army standard boot, they teamed up with Meindl

    In my previous post I wrote the old school boots for short hikes, humpin about.
    For Hiking I use Hanwag mountain boots in B class (relatively light sole). Full leather inner and outer. I Always go full leather.

    I used some cheaper Merrel boot, but for my feet, they gave no support whatsoever.

    0da16e3d6ce4668982a76935f7825c7fa4a0e18e.jpg



    eng_pm_DUTCH-ARMY-BLACK-GORETEX-MOUNTAIN-SHOES-USED-MEINDL-5-PCS-ASSORTMENT-38598_1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2019
  5. La\\//inci

    La\\//inci Tracker

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    This is a very informative paper. The section on footwear confirms to me why I like my Garmont T8 BIFEDA boots so much. They are lighter, less restrictive and absorb impact better than any of the hikers I have used.

    Weight is the biggest factor for me. I need a lite shoe. The T8 work exceptionally for me. My feet don’t lie, but my brain does.

    The only way to find a boot that works for you is to put it on and Hike with a pack for a few miles. You will know right away if you have a problem.
    Thanks for sharing
    ymwv
     
  6. The Desert Rat

    The Desert Rat Tracker

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    Agreed
     
  7. NorCalBigAl

    NorCalBigAl Supporter Supporter

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    I’ve been a Danner fan for about 8 years. I’ve got a pair of the Gortex lined USMC boots and they’re still water proof after 8 years, they’re recraftable also. The only thing that’s gotten the most wear are the laces on my left foot from shifting my motorcycle (these boots are also great when I’m riding back roads from the bike and don’t want to wear my steel shank motocross boots).
     
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